Learn it fast with expert-taught software and skills training at lynda.com. See what you can learn

By Jeff Carlson | Thursday, September 18, 2014

Editing Old Photo Files? Update to Latest Raw Process

Leaf Like Lizard Skin

You captured some photos in raw format, maybe edited a few on your computer, and moved onto the next photo adventure.

But then, years later, you run across one you’d like to edit a bit more and are faced with something new—a badge or alert in your software like this one:

A warning badge in Adobe Camera Raw

A warning badge in Adobe Camera Raw

Did something corrupt the image? No, that badge indicates the photo can be updated to a newer raw process. Here’s how:

By Lauren Harmon | Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Mixing a Low-Color Photo with the Camera Raw Filter

2014_09_16_DTlowcolor

Learn how to revive a photo that has an inspired composition but lackluster color in this episode of Deke’s Techniques.

In this video, Deke uses a photo of his beautiful companion seated under a jaw-dropping red-rock arch.

The only problem? The color is a little dull.

However, using two passes of the Camera Raw filter, Deke is able to convert the image to black and white and then reinstate the color selectively, resulting in a cool, steely looking photograph, worthy of printing at a poster size.

By Lauren Harmon | Tuesday, June 10, 2014

Blend Two Exposures into One

2014_06_10_DekeTek

Learn how to blend two exposures and get the best of both worlds with Adobe Camera Raw and Photoshop. Today’s free episode of Deke’s Techniques shows you how to take an underexposed landscape photograph and create a lighter, brighter version of it to reveal all its detail—then combine the two images for a third, more dramatic image. As Deke explains, it’s just not possible to get the same effect with the Graduated Filter alone. It’s these two programs together that can help rescue your most extreme exposures.

Find out how to create a lighter version of the image with Camera Raw’s development tools, and combine the bright foreground with the darker sky of the original exposure using Photoshop’s masking capabilities. Deke also shows how to enhance the effect with a graduated filter and add a round of High Pass Sharpening to bring all the details of the final image into sharper relief. Click the free video to learn more.

Members of the lynda.com library can watch the follow-up movie to find out how to create the mask shown in this technique, from scratch. Then come back next week to learn how to create a photographic caricature using Photoshop’s Free Transform and Liquify tools.

By Lauren Harmon | Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Clean up a smartphone photo: Deke's Techniques

Clean up a smartphone image

Do you ever notice how a photo that looks great on your phone looks terrible on a larger screen? Images shot on iPhone and Android devices (even the newest models) tend to be low resolution and grainy. This can be disappointing when you have an image you want to share somewhere other than, well, your phone. Enter Adobe Camera Raw and the one and only Deke McClelland. In today’s free episode of Deke’s Techniques, Deke shows how to clean up a noisy iPhone image using Camera Raw’s powerful toolset, including options like Clarity, Luminance, and Color and the Spot Removal tool. With a little extra help from Photoshop’s Smart Sharpen filter, Deke shows how to create a serviceable image that doesn’t scream “camera phone.”

By Jim Heid | Thursday, January 09, 2014

A Raw+JPEG Workflow for the iPad

raw-jpeg-ben-practicingphotographer

The best way to extract every bit of image quality from your camera is to shoot in its raw mode. A raw image contains the exact data recorded by the camera’s sensor. By comparison, when a camera creates a JPEG image, it discards significant amounts of data in order to make the image more compact.

But life is full of trade-offs. Raw files provide far more flexibility when adjusting exposure and color balance in a post-processing program such as Adobe Lightroom, but use far more storage space than JPEGs. Many cameras have a “best of both worlds” mode in which they create a companion JPEG file along with a raw file. This lets you use the JPEG for minor edits but fall back on the raw file should the image require significant adjustments that, with a JPEG, could compromise quality.

By Lauren Harmon | Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Developing a 32-bit HDR image in Camera Raw: Deke's Techniques

Develop a 32-bit HDR Image in Camera Raw

Explore Deke’s Techniques at lynda.com.

Today’s Deke’s Techniques video shows how to merge multiple exposures inside of Adobe Photoshop CC and Camera Raw, creating a high dynamic range (HDR) image. For those not in the know, HDR imaging reproduces a wider exposure range, capturing both the faintest and most direct light in a single image. The classic example is a dark ground plane against a bright sky. However, without a special HDR-equipped camera, you don’t have much of a choice when you’re shooting. You can capture the sky and let the foreground recede into shadow, or capture the foreground and blow out the sky. By combining these images in post, you get the best of both worlds: a bright sky with detailed shadows.

In this technique, Deke uses Photoshop to perform the Merge to HDR Pro, resulting in a 32-bit image with lots of visual information but not a lot of life. He then takes advantage of the seamless Creative Cloud workflow to send the 32-bit HDR image to Camera Raw for further refinement, using the Camera Raw filter. Get started with the free video below, which includes bonus tips on getting multiple exposures with your camera’s bracketed shooting mode.

By Jim Heid | Thursday, September 12, 2013

Fix exposure problems in a batch of photos: The Practicing Photographer

ben

Explore the Practicing Photographer at lynda.com.

In last week’s installment of The Practicing Photographer, we joined Ben Long at a wildlife preserve, where he photographed buffalo and prairie dogs—and shared some wildlife photography tips along the way.  This week, it’s back to the buffalo—but this time, they’re on Ben’s computer screen. Something went wrong during Ben’s wildlife shoot: A lot of his photos were slightly overexposed and washed out. Camera light meters aren’t perfect, and when they don’t read a scene accurately, exposure problems result.

Fortunately, Adobe Photoshop—and other imaging programs, such as Lightroom, Aperture, and iPhoto—can often fix exposure problems. And if you shoot using your camera’s raw mode, you have that much more adjustment flexibility. That’s because raw mode saves every bit of data that your camera’s sensor recorded. By comparison, when you shoot in JPEG mode, your camera’s internal software—in its zeal to create a compact image file—throws away roughly one-third of the information that the sensor recorded.

By Lauren Harmon | Tuesday, April 16, 2013

Deke's Techniques: Defringing purples and greens in Camera Raw

Learn how to get rid of a special variety of color distortion called color fringing that’s at work inside your digital photographs. Color fringing falls into two color ranges—purple and green—which are color complements, falling on opposite sides of the color wheel. In this week’s Deke’s Techniques, Adobe guru Deke McClelland shows you how to identify and remove color fringing inside Camera Raw, and ensure that you get accurate color corrections.

Note that these instructions work best with Camera Raw 7, which ships with Photoshop CS6. If you’re working in an older version of the program, check out the videos at the end of this tutorial.

The original, fringed image

Get the latest news

  •   New course releases
  •   Pro tips and tricks
  •   News and updates
  
New releases submit clicked

You can change your email preferences at any time. We will never sell your email. More info

Featured articles

A lynda.com membership includes:

Unlimited access to thousands of courses in our library
Certificates of completion
New courses added every week (almost every day!)
Course history to track your progress
Downloadable practice files
Playlists and bookmarks to organize your learning
Become a member

Thanks for signing up.

We’ll send you a confirmation email shortly.


Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

Keep up with news, tips, and latest courses with emails from lynda.com.

Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

   
submit Lightbox submit clicked
Terms and conditions of use

We've updated our terms and conditions (now called terms of service).Go
Review and accept our updated terms of service.