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By Tim Grey | Wednesday, May 07, 2014

Batch Processing in Adobe Camera Raw

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One of the best-kept secrets of Adobe Camera Raw is that you can process multiple photos in batch, synchronizing settings across multiple images, and even fine-tuning the settings for each image individually. This provides a workflow that’s easy and efficient to implement—especially compared to using an action for batch processing multiple images within Photoshop.

I recommend getting started in Adobe Bridge, where you can make use of the Filter panel (available from the Window menu) to filter images, selecting those you want to process. This generally involves images of the same basic subject that were captured at about the same time, with the same overall lighting conditions and exposure settings.

By Tim Grey | Tuesday, May 06, 2014

Capturing Clouds for Time-Lapse Photography

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Clouds are a popular subject for time-lapse photography, and for good reason: The result can produce a fascinating display of billowing buildups or a time-accelerated flow of clouds across the frame. But there are a few things you’ll want to keep in mind when shooting clouds as a sequence of images you plan to assemble into a time-lapse video.

By Vincent Versace | Friday, May 02, 2014

Rename Your Photos with Adobe Bridge

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Locating and identifying one of your photos using the default camera file name is an exercise in futility; it just doesn’t work.

Using dedicated photo management software is one solution—but it comes at a price. And depending which software vendor you choose, that price could be an ongoing subscription fee that many photographers dislike.

But if you already have a version of Photoshop, then you have all the tools you need to batch rename your photos and give them more meaningful names.

By Vincent Versace | Thursday, May 01, 2014

4 Habits That Make It Easy to Find Your Photos

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Want a photography workflow that makes it easy to find images in your archive—using only basic logic and memory? Adopt these four habits now, and you’ll be able to find the photos you need later.

By Derrick Story | Wednesday, April 16, 2014

5 tips for organizing your photos in Aperture

Manage your photos in Aperture

Your photo library is getting bigger every day—it’s a fact that photographers can’t escape in this age of digital and mobile photography. As your collection grows, it becomes more and more important to have an organization plan so you can find your images when you need them.

By adopting just a few simple practices, you can take advantage of one of Aperture’s strongest features: getting your image library in order.

By Chris Orwig | Thursday, April 10, 2014

Introducing Lightroom Mobile

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Lightroom Mobile is a new iPad app that might just change the way you work on your photos. When I first started using it as a beta-tester a few months ago, I was curious but not convinced. Truth be told, when it comes to new technology I’m a bit of a skeptic; apart from something being new, I want to know if it’s actually going to improve my life. Yet after a few weeks, my skepticism completely dissolved and I now consider Lightroom Mobile to be a game changer for photographers in the best possible way.

For the last seven years, working in Lightroom meant working on a traditional computer (desktop or laptop). But as the photographer’s toolkit expanded to include other devices like mobile phones and tablets, it seemed like Lightroom was missing the boat—that is, until now.

Lightroom Mobile isn’t just another make-your-photos-look-better app. Sure, it does that, but more importantly it extends your Lightroom Desktop workflow in a helpful way. Here’s how it works.

By Jim Heid | Thursday, February 13, 2014

Shooting Silhouettes

Ben and Musician

Sometimes shapes tell a better story than details. When you photograph a subject in silhouette, you emphasize body language instead of facial expressions. A silhouette can be a powerful way to tell a story or convey a scene in an abstract way.

By Jim Heid | Thursday, February 06, 2014

Scanning Polaroid Negatives

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A couple of months ago on The Practicing Photographer, fashion and portrait photographer Troy Word joined Ben Long for a discussion of the joys of instant photography—specifically, using a Polaroid camera along with beautiful black-and-white film manufactured by Fuji.

Fuji’s film works in what are called “pack-film” Polaroids. After you shoot a photo with these cameras, you pull the exposed film out, wait a specified amount of time, and then peel the print away from its backing. It’s that process that earns this format its other name: peel-apart. And it’s that peel that holds such appeal to Ben Long in this week’s The Practicing Photographer. When you separate a sheet of peel-apart film, you end up with your photo (obviously) and a negative.

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