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By Derrick Story | Friday, August 01, 2014

Field Test: Lightroom Mobile in Maui

Editing-in-LRM

Lightroom Mobile is an app that lets me bring bits of my Lightroom library with me on the road. But after using it in Hawaii for a week, the tool felt more like a one-way ticket than a roundtrip.

It does a decent job of providing mobile access to an established library on a Windows or Mac computer back home. Using Creative Cloud as the conduit, I can sync Collections within my Lightroom catalog, and view them practically anywhere on an iPad or iPhone. That’s handy.

But I also wanted to upload and manage pictures that I captured in Maui using Lightroom Mobile on my iPad. Going this direction—let’s call it the return trip—was bumpier. The biggest roadblock was that I couldn’t add IPTC metadata, such as copyright, caption, and author name.

Here’s a closer look at how this journey unfolded:

By Kevin Steele | Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Sports Photography: Staging an Action Shot

Jenn Dedoes triathlete

Sports photography is not limited to shooting from the sideline or documenting a race or event. Most of my commercial advertising and editorial work is staged and set up with careful planning and teamwork.

Here’s how I capture the quintessential moment of action—from advance planning to on-the-fly experimenting.

By Jan Kabili | Monday, July 28, 2014

Find Your Lightroom Photos Easily—with Keywords

2014_07_28_Lightroom1

Putting your finger on a particular photo in a large Lightroom library can be like finding a needle in a haystack. Keywords get my vote for the most powerful way to keep track of photos in Lightroom.

Here are my favorite tips for making keywording in Lightroom work for you:

By Joseph Linaschke | Thursday, July 24, 2014

Shoot Macro Photos — with a Pringles Can

PringlesCan_10

Macro photography requires a big investment in lots of expensive gear, right? Well, maybe not. With a little creative thinking, you can save money by doing some amazing things at home.

A ring light is an expensive but incredibly useful accessory for shooting flash photography of close-up objects. If you aren’t ready to invest in one, but want to play around with one, try this:

Using nothing more than a Pringles can and a few common household items, I’ll show you how to create softly lit macro photos with a pop-up flash.

By Carolyn E. Wright | Monday, July 21, 2014

5 Things You Must Do Before Starting a Photography Business

Elephants at Water

Friends are asking you to take their family photos. Strangers are inquiring about copies of your images. You’re thinking about trying to make some money from your photography.

But what do you need to get started? Here’s a checklist for getting started with your photography business.

By Jeff Carlson | Thursday, July 17, 2014

iPad Photography in the Field: Rate, Tag, and Export Photos

ipad_field3_bikes

An iPad in your photo bag gives you more than just a way to check your email when you’ve finished shooting. In Part 1 of this series, I pointed out how the iPad can help you research photo locations. In Part 2, I demonstrated how valuable the iPad can be for importing and reviewing photos while you’re still capturing them on location.

But what happens after the shots are captured? Traditionally, you’d have to wait until you could transfer the photos from your memory cards to a computer for further work. With the iPad, though, you can get a jump on important post-processing tasks like rating and applying keywords while you’re still in the field and your memory’s fresh—and so they don’t loom over you when you get home.

By Jeff Carlson | Thursday, July 10, 2014

iPad Photography in the Field: Review Photos on Location

ipad_field2_grassy

The iPad is a great field companion for photographers looking to reduce their load of camera gear. From researching locations to checking shots on location and organizing photos afterwards, the iPad can be much more than a window into your Facebook stream—or even for watching training videos.

In Part 1 of the iPad Photography in the Field series, we looked at how an iPad (and iPhone, in some situations) can serve as a research assistant and location scout to determine where and when you should go shooting. In this installment, we’ll focus on making the most of your time on location.

By Carolyn E. Wright | Tuesday, July 08, 2014

How to Copyright Your Photos

Eye of the Wolf

It’s easier than ever for someone to steal your photographs in this digital age. So it’s wise to consider your copyright options.

By law, the copyrights for your photographs are created when you click the shutter. Even if the photograph is never registered, the copyright exists and is protected by copyright law.

But the best way to protect your photographs is to register them with the US Copyright Office. Here’s how.

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