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By Todd Dewett | Wednesday, May 28, 2014

Hiring and Ramping Up Employees

Hiring and Ramping Up New Employees

When it comes to hiring people and bringing them into the team, most companies have a lot of room for improvement. Assuming we attract the right candidates, we still need to know how to vet them. Here’s the rub: Most people making hiring decisions have never been trained to interview effectively.

Interviews often become weird sessions wherein the interviewer dominates and pontificates too much. Often, it’s a dry, highly structured box-checking affair that complies with the process while failing to correctly assess the candidate.

By Todd Dewett | Wednesday, May 21, 2014

Supporting Creativity

Supporting Creativity

This week’s tips address one of my favorite topics—and one that’s vital to your career: creativity. Anyone can become a subject matter expert, and just about anyone can learn to make sound decisions. But it takes a bit more dedication and bravery to hone your professional creativity.

This week’s first tip focuses on your personal creative ability. Bad news: You’ve grown up and forgotten that once upon a time you were a creative genius. All kids are. It’s amazing how life used to be nothing but imagination and possibilities.

By Todd Dewett | Wednesday, May 14, 2014

Managing Ethical Dilemmas

Managing Ethical Dilemmas

Decision making is difficult enough when you’re dealing with everyday issues. When you add in ethical considerations, the difficulty jumps to another level. How to handle it is the focus of this week’s first tip.

Here’s the truth: Life isn’t black and white. It’s gray. Whether you like it or not, you’ll run into occasional spots where you’ve got to make a decision, but knowing right from wrong won’t be as crystal clear as you wish it were.

By Todd Dewett | Wednesday, May 07, 2014

Managing Wayward Projects

Restarting wayward projects

Many management roles revolve around projects—a work structure that can be easy to understand but difficult to master. The first tip this week addresses a crucial aspect of project management: what to do when you lose momentum.

Projects occasionally falter or reach a standstill. They might even be formally paused by management so a team can focus on higher–priority initiatives. Whatever the reason, if you’re running the show when your project stops making progress, it might be time to restart the project.

By Todd Dewett | Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Pitching Ideas

Pitch an Idea

This week I have some tips for you on pitching ideas. Many pitched ideas aren’t taken seriously—not because an idea is bad, but because the person pitching it doesn’t know how to sell it.

If you’re pitching a new idea—a change or innovation—you have to be prepared. A good pitch is all about understanding what your audience needs, connecting with their higher goals and purpose, and co–opting the support of others who can help make your case.

By Todd Dewett | Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Managing in Bureaucracies

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There’s some irony in the life of an organization. One the one hand, success leads to necessary growth in the organizational hierarchy and the overall amount of bureaucracy. On the other hand, that fact often erodes managers’ ability to feel empowered to make decisions.

Reclaiming your decision-making ability when needed is in many ways about fighting bureaucracy. The first tip this week addresses this challenge. Let’s be clear, no wildly successful person achieves success without locking horns with a few bureaucrats over policies. Not all tape is red, nor do all bureaucrats create roadblocks–but successful leaders see the difference and effectively manage tricky bureaucratic situations.

By Todd Dewett | Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Choose to Become a Leader

Choose to become a leader

Leadership is not an exclusive club. Anyone can join.

Anyone includes introverts, too. In my first tip this week, we examine the fallacy that extroverts make better leaders than introverts. Sure, in some situations, an extrovert’s tendency to speak confidently and off-the-cuff can be very effective. But in others, an introvert’s tendency to carefully process thoughts before speaking may be exactly what’s needed.

By Todd Dewett | Wednesday, April 09, 2014

Avoid the pitfalls of leadership

Avoid common management pitfalls

To be successful as a leader, you have to move quickly while avoiding the common pitfalls that all leaders face.

One pitfall is making dangerous assumptions—like assuming that it’s not your job to develop the talent around you. You’d think that with all the leadership-related books, blogs, and videos on the market, professionals would understand the importance of helping to develop those around them. But you’d be wrong.

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