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By Lauren Harmon | Tuesday, May 13, 2014

Creating a 3D Bump Map in Photoshop

Create a 3D Bump Map

You might have heard that Photoshop “does 3D” now. Many of us have heard the rumor, but have yet to see it in action. In this free episode of Deke’s Techniques, Deke provides a demo, performing a task uniquely suited to Photoshop: creating a 3D bump map in Photoshop and applying it to 3D objects. He transforms an image into a repeating tile pattern that can be wrapped (aka mapped) around the body of a rocket ship—a model he created completely from scratch in Photoshop. He shows how to assign the texture to the rocket layer, render the scene to test the map, and resize the pattern to fit the object properly. In the end, you’ll have a realistically textured 3D surface.

By Lauren Harmon | Thursday, May 08, 2014

Preserve Image Scale When Resizing

When you edit images in other programs like Photoshop, InDesign will often re-scale the image when it realizes there was a change. In most cases, this is perfectly appropriate behavior. But sometimes you don’t want scaling. The good news is that InDesign offers a file handling preference that lets you dictate how it treats relinked images. Watch this week’s free episode of InDesign Secrets to learn how to change this preference and preserve the dimensions of edited images.

By Lauren Harmon | Tuesday, May 06, 2014

Turning a Photo into a Giant Mural with Photoshop

Create a Mural

Since Deke’s Techniques kicked off in January 2011, Deke McClelland has shown you how to transform everyday portraits into Warhol-esque artwork, cartoon figures, and even cave paintings. Today he shows you how to blow up a portrait to building-sized proportions with Adobe Photoshop and and create the illusion of a giant mural.

By Lauren Harmon | Tuesday, April 29, 2014

Creating a Passport-Perfect Headshot

Create a passport-perfect headshot

Poor lighting? Cheap camera? Indifferent photographer? These are the conditions most passport photos are taken under, and the results usually speak for themselves. But you can create a better passport photo for yourself—even from the worst raw material—with today’s free episode of Deke’s Techniques. Deke follows the specifications issued by the US Department of State, and provides a template to make sure your composition meets the required size, pose, and proportions. Once the legalities are taken care of, he shows how to center, color correct, and enhance your photo with Photoshop and Adobe Camera Raw.

By Lauren Harmon | Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Auto-Hiding Iconic Panels in Photoshop

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Photoshop’s interface is highly customizable; you can rearrange panels, hide them, and pop panels in and out of your dock at will. Once you open a panel, though, it doesn’t automatically close after you have “done your business.” That can get annoying—fast. Luckily, Deke has a remedy for this minor irritation. In today’s free episode of Deke’s Techniques, he reveals the preference that enables you to collapse iconic panels quickly, by simply clicking anywhere else in Photoshop. (Iconic panels are the ones represented by icons in the secondary panel bar, like Properties, Brushes, etc.) Plus, get a bonus tip on moving around the fields in a panel straight from the keyboard.

By Lauren Harmon | Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Assign Brush Strokes to Paths in Illustrator

Assign brush strokes to paths

Uniform strokes can be uniformly dull. But you can transform your vector artwork and give it more of a hand-drawn appearance with Illustrator’s brushes. This week’s episode of Deke’s Techniques takes the Chinese chop you created in the last video and roughs it up a little by assigning brush strokes to paths in Illustrator. Deke shows how to simulate calligraphic lettering and turn your chop into a more authentic-looking stamp, by first transforming the chop into a Smart Object to preserve the original artwork. Click the free video below to get started.

Members of the lynda.com library can watch the two follow-up videos to learn how to to add a paper texture and create a black-on-red variation of their chops. Come back next week to learn how to hide panels that appear by default in Photoshop.

By Lauren Harmon | Tuesday, April 08, 2014

Create Your Own Chinese Seal in Illustrator

Create your own Chinese seal in Illustrator

You can sign your name to your artwork—or better yet, you can stamp it. In this special episode of Deke’s Techniques, Deke shows how to transform your name into a Chinese seal, also known as a chop.

By Lauren Harmon | Tuesday, April 01, 2014

Working with Photoshop 1.0

Working with Photoshop 1.0 One of the goals of Deke’s Techniques is to keep you, our members, up to date with the latest technology. That’s why Deke is here today to introduce Adobe Photoshop, a new way to digitally manipulate scanned photographs. Right now it’s only available on Apple Macintoshes—still a niche product—but it’s worth exploring this clever little program if you can get your hands on a Mac IIci or even an IIfx model. Take a look at features like 2-megapixel image support, large and small brushes, one level of Undo per file, and partial support of color. Plus, there’s the brilliant Save As dialog box, which allows you to save your image as a PXR, or PICT Resource file. But only if you have enough memory.

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