Learn it fast with expert-taught software and skills training at lynda.com. See what you can learn

By Garrick Chow | Sunday, November 23, 2014

Giving a Song as a Gift? Your Guide to Mixing in GarageBand

mixing in garageband will give your song that polished sound

There’s no more personal and heartfelt gift you can give someone than a song you wrote and recorded just for them.

I’ve shown you how to record a song in GarageBand. The next step is to make your recorded tracks sound good—both by themselves and when they’re all mixed together.

There are some really useful tools for cleaning up your less-than-perfect takes and mixing in GarageBand. Let me know you.

By Garrick Chow | Friday, November 07, 2014

Record a Song in GarageBand — as a Unique Holiday Gift

2014_11_07_RecordSongHero

If you’re looking for a truly unique gift for a special friend or family member this year, you may already have the tools you need to record a song in GarageBand — and give it as a one-of-a-kind present.

Included free with all new Macs, or at just $4.99 to download from the Mac App Store, GarageBand is your key to a truly personal gift that won’t break the bank. In this three-part series, we’ll take a look at how to create a new project in GarageBand, record your tracks, edit them, and share your completed song.

By Garrick Chow | Saturday, September 20, 2014

Musicians: Make a Lyrics Video to Share Your Songs on YouTube

Screen Shot 2014-09-20 at 11.33.52 AM

It may surprise you to learn that, after traditional radio stations, the number one place where people go to discover new music today is not iTunes, or Spotify, or Pandora. It’s YouTube.

As a result of hundreds of thousands of music fans uploading videos of their favorite songs in their entirety, YouTube has become the world’s largest jukebox. If you’re an independent musician, posting your music to YouTube has become an important way to share your music and gain new fans.

However, you may not have the financial means or the time to plan, shoot, and edit a full video production for all the songs you want to promote.

An increasingly common solution for musicians who want to get their songs up on YouTube so they can be found by fans is to make a lyrics video, which is simply a video in which the lyrics to the song play along with the music in real time. This is a quick and inexpensive way to post your songs to YouTube while providing a visual that’s more interesting than a static image.

Lyrics videos can be created in nearly any video editing software. Let’s take a look at how to create one in iMovie for the Mac.

By Garrick Chow | Thursday, September 04, 2014

Has Celebrity Photo Hack Got You Paranoid? Get Secure

2014_09_04_PasswordSecure

As you may have heard, earlier this week several celebrities had photos of a personal nature stolen from their computers or mobile devices, which were then shared and distributed online.

The celebrity photo hack story is still unfolding, and while it’s not completely clear how their devices and cloud-based accounts were accessed in each case, we thought this would be a good time to review some basic steps you should be following to make sure your personal files—and your internet privacy—are secure.

By Garrick Chow | Monday, June 23, 2014

Consider the Dingbat

dingbats-hero_image

Most people have dozens if not hundreds of fonts installed on their computers in the form of serif, sans-serif, mono-spaced, and script fonts. But an often overlooked font type is the dingbat font.

On the computer you’re using right now, especially if you have a version of Microsoft Office installed, you probably have at least a handful of dingbat fonts available, such Webdings, Wingdings, or Zapf Dingbats.

Unlike other types of fonts, which are collections of letters, special characters, and punctuation marks, dingbat fonts are collections of unique non-letter ornaments, symbols, or shapes. You’ve most likely checked out the dingbat fonts while trying to format a document, only to quickly dismiss them when you found there were no letters in those fonts.

By Garrick Chow | Thursday, May 15, 2014

Sign a PDF Document with Your Webcam

Sign a PDF form with your webcam

It’s Small Business Week, and we have a handy tip for small business owners—who have to approve and sign a multitude of forms, invoices, and documents throughout any week. More often than not these days, forms are transmitted electronically; lots of people still sign these forms by printing out a copy, signing it with a pen, scanning it, and then emailing the scan back to the sender.

But there are easier ways.

By Garrick Chow | Friday, March 11, 2011

Creating a Facebook Page for your organization

Many people who are interested in creating a Facebook presence for their business, band, or other organization often make the mistake of setting up a new personal profile on Facebook, substituting the name of their organization into the First and Last name fields on the Facebook signup page. This can frequently result in frustration (especially when you’re trying to fill in the fields for the gender and birthdate of your organization), and there’s usually a decent chance of the profile being disabled by Facebook, because Facebook profiles are intended for personal use by individuals, not groups or companies.

To create a presence for your group, you need to use Facebook Pages, which are essentially profiles geared towards companies and other organizations or services. To create a Page, sign into your personal Facebook account and then go to facebook.com/pages and click the + Create Page button. (If you don’t have a personal Facebook account you can still create a page by going to facebook.com/pages, but you will have to register in order to administer your Page.)

Next, choose which kind of organization you’re creating the Page for, such as a band, a non-profit, your freelancing service, and so on. Based on the category you choose, you’ll be asked to enter additional information, such as the address of your business, or the name of the event you’re creating the Page for. Just follow the prompts to complete the required info. Once you’re done with the set up you’ll be taken to your page.

At that point you can start dressing up your Page like a regular Facebook profile by adding photos, posting status updates, and commenting or posting on other people’s Walls. One important note: if you want your comments to appear as being posted by your organization, and not from your personal Facebook account, go to the Account menu in the upper-right hand corner of the website, and choose Use Facebook as Page. If you have more than one Page, you’ll be able to select which identity you’d like to use when interacting with other pages and profiles. Return to the Accounts menu when you’re ready to switch back to your personal identity again.

Here are some other cool and useful things you can do with your Page. First click Edit Info under your Page’s name. From there you can do things like:

Add apps. Select Apps from the left hand column, and choose to add apps like Events, Photos, Video, and Discussion Boards, which make it easy to add multimedia and interactivity to your page.

Add Admins. More than one person can manage a Facebook Page. Just go to Manage Admins to give other Facebook users Admin privileges. Just be sure you trust the people you make admins, because they’ll have complete control over the Page.

Check your stats. Click Insights to see data and graphs detailing how many people have Liked your Page and how many users are actively using your Page each month.

And be sure to explore the other categories in the left sidebar to see what additional options are available for you to customize.

Once your Facebook Page is looking the way you like, be sure to promote it by linking to it on your personal account’s wall so that it will appear in your friends’ newsfeeds. Encourage friends and others to visit your page and to click the Like button and become Fans of your Page. Any updates or announcements you make on your Page will appear in the newsfeeds of all your Fans.

Learn more about creating Facebook Pages in Social Media Marketing with Facebook and Twitter with Anne-Marie Concepcion, which will be updated later this spring with new information.

By Garrick Chow | Friday, May 21, 2010

How to take screen shots on your Mac or PC

There are often times, especially when I’m trying to convey a technical issue I’m having with my computer, when it’s much easier to show the problem than to spend paragraphs trying to explain it. Both Macs and PCs have had the ability to take screen shots (or screen captures) since time immemorial, and it’s a simple and useful task for capturing a problem visually. Screen shots are also useful for creating how-to documentation or to complement a review or other article about a piece of software, for example. Here’s a primer on how to take screen shots on your computer in case you have to capture what’s on your screen at a given time.

Macs

  • To capture the entire screen: Shift+Command+3
  • To capture a selected portion of the screen: Shift+Command+4 turns your mouse cursor into a cross hair. Drag a rectangle around the portion of the screen you want to capture.
  • To capture a window: Shift+Command+4 again turns your mouse cursor into a crosshair. Then press the spacebar, which turns your cursor into a camera icon. Place the camera icon over the window you wish to capture (the selected window will highlight in blue) and then click. Even if the window you’re capturing is partially obscured by another window on top of it, your screen capture will be of the entire unobscured window.

In each case, you’ll hear a camera shutter sound to let you know the screen capture worked. The images you capture will be saved to your Mac’s desktop. On Mac OS 10.6 Snow Leopard, the file is saved as a PNG and named as “Screen shot” followed by the date and time you took the shot. Earlier versions of Mac OS X name screenshots as Picture 1, Picture 2, etc., and save them as either PNGs or PDFs.

Windows

  • To capture the entire screen: press the Print Screen button (possibly labeled PrtScn or something similar, depending on your keyboard). This copies the entire screen onto your computer’s clipboard.
  • To capture the active (frontmost) window: press Alt+Print Screen. Again, this copies the selected window to your computer’s clipboard.

Unlike the Mac, there is no audible feedback when you perform a screen capture on Windows, and instead of saving the screen capture as a file, Windows only copies the image to your clipboard. You’ll then have to open an image editing program, such as Microsoft Paint, and click the Paste button to paste your screen capture into the document, where you can then edit it before you save it, if you like.

Mac OS X also includes an application called Grab, located in your Applications > Utilities folder, which gives you slightly better controls over the portion of the screen you’re capturing. It also offers a “Timed Screen” option which gives you 10 seconds to get your screen ready before it takes the shot. This can be useful if you need to capture something in action and don’t have your hands free to manually perform the screen capture.

Windows Vista and Windows 7 both include an application called Snipping Tool, located in All Programs > Accessories, and it, too, gives you more and better options for creating screen captures, including the ability to grab irregular shapes and specific portions of the screen.

So if you’ve never taken screen shots before, take some time and play around with the different controls and options. You may be surprised at how often screen captures come in handy.

See the accompanying video for additional screen shot controls.

Get the latest news

  •   New course releases
  •   Pro tips and tricks
  •   News and updates
  
New releases submit clicked

You can change your email preferences at any time. We will never sell your email. More info

Featured articles

A lynda.com membership includes:

Unlimited access to thousands of courses in our library
Certificates of completion
New courses added every week (almost every day!)
Course history to track your progress
Downloadable practice files
Playlists and bookmarks to organize your learning
Become a member

Thanks for signing up.

We’ll send you a confirmation email shortly.


Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

Keep up with news, tips, and latest courses with emails from lynda.com.

Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

   
submit Lightbox submit clicked
Terms and conditions of use

We've updated our terms and conditions (now called terms of service).Go
Review and accept our updated terms of service.