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By Eduardo Angel | Saturday, September 13, 2014

Dolly Shots 101: Tracking Your Subject

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Nowadays dolly shots can be found in nearly every film, from indie low-budget productions to high-end Hollywood blockbusters. Technically speaking, the dolly setup is simple, consisting of a mobile platform, a construction upon which the platform glides, and the camera. You can achieve this camera movement with a dolly on tracks, a dolly on wheels, or—for faster, easier setups—a slider (see the latest Video Gear Weekly episode for more tips on sliders). Dolly shots are also often referred to as tracking or trucking shots.

By Eduardo Angel | Friday, September 05, 2014

Shake It Up? When to Use a Handheld Camera

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Camera movement is a powerful tool in filmmaking. It can infuse a scene with drama, track a characters’ movements, direct the viewer’s attention, reveal key details in a scene, and transition between shots in a sequence.

There are essentially six types of camera motion techniques: tilts, pans, dollies, trucks, pedestals, and arcs—and you can accomplish all of these with a handheld camera.

By Eduardo Angel | Saturday, August 02, 2014

Camera Movement: Tripod or Monopod?

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Unlike still photography, filmmaking is a medium defined by motion. Motion is the action within the frame—but it’s also the motion of the frame itself. Even a series of well-lit and well-composed shots can be perceived as a slideshow rather than a story in motion if the shots remain “stagnant.”

Nowadays we’re so used to seeing camera movement in Hollywood films that we expect to see movement in all the videos we watch—even if we don’t know much about filmmaking.

Here are the primary tools for accomplishing camera movement—and when to use which:

By Eduardo Angel | Tuesday, July 01, 2014

Shooting Video in Noon Lighting

Lighting Design for Video Productions” on lynda.com 03

Working with small crews—and sometimes even smaller budgets—video production crews often have to work fast with limited tools. A common situation is shooting B-roll the very same day you arrive in a new city. Understanding simple techniques like harvesting harsh noon sunlight or harnessing available shade can make or break a day on location.

Here are some tips for making the most of a location shoot in noon lighting.

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