Migrating from Word 2003 to Word 2010
Illustration by Neil Webb

Searching for content using the Navigation pane


From:

Migrating from Word 2003 to Word 2010

with David Rivers

Video: Searching for content using the Navigation pane

The way you find content in a document has changed from Word 2003 to Word 2010. We're going to look at those differences now. Starting here in Word 2003, we've got a document open, a fairly long document. If we want to find a certain word or certain content in this document, the typical keyboard shortcut is Ctrl+F. This opens up the Find and Replace dialog box. You'll see the Find tab is selected. In the Find what field, you'll see the last thing you searched for. Now, we can search for anything, such as the word humbug for example.

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Watch the Online Video Course Migrating from Word 2003 to Word 2010
1h 1m Appropriate for all Aug 11, 2010

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In Migrating from Word 2003 to Word 2010, David Rivers walks through the switch to Word 2010 and the key differences users need to understand, including the Ribbon interface and changed file formats. This course provides in-depth information on working in a mixed Word environment and dealing with file compatibility issues, and also demonstrates how common Word tasks are performed in Word 2010 in comparison to Word 2003. Exercise files accompany the course.

Topics include:
  • Comparing the Word 2003 and 2010 interfaces
  • Exploring the new Ribbon and Backstage view
  • Searching for content with the Navigation pane
  • Working in a mixed Word environment
  • Dealing with file compatibility issues
  • Changing the default file format
  • Using keyboard shortcuts
  • Understanding Compatibility Mode
  • Inserting screen clips
  • Creating documents with building blocks
  • Converting documents to PDF and XPS files
Subject:
Business
Software:
Word
Author:
David Rivers

Searching for content using the Navigation pane

The way you find content in a document has changed from Word 2003 to Word 2010. We're going to look at those differences now. Starting here in Word 2003, we've got a document open, a fairly long document. If we want to find a certain word or certain content in this document, the typical keyboard shortcut is Ctrl+F. This opens up the Find and Replace dialog box. You'll see the Find tab is selected. In the Find what field, you'll see the last thing you searched for. Now, we can search for anything, such as the word humbug for example.

We also have the ability to highlight those items by clicking the checkbox. When we do that, we can find all occurrences of the word humbug. You can see they're highlighted through the document. We can also turn that off, and just go from one to the next, to the next. As we click Find Next, you can see we're moving through the document and there's quite a few occurrences of the word humbug. Let's just click Close and switch over to Microsoft Word 2010. Now when you do a Ctrl+F keyboard shortcut, or from the Home tab on the Ribbon, click the Find button, you're going to see something different.

It's called the navigation pane. It's going to appear over here on the left-hand side. You can type whatever you want in here and start searching for it, such as the word humbug. Now, the second you do that, something happens. Highlighting is turned on. You're going to see all of the occurrences of the word humbug highlighted in your document, but you're also going to see a brief description, kind of showing the context here in the navigation pane itself. As you hover over those occurrences, you're going to see a little bit of information like the page where it appears and the section.

In this case, for example, as we scroll down, we see on Page 2 in the Introduction. We can click there to go directly to the Introduction and see the highlighted words. There are some other options as well. Although there are 92 matches here, we have three tabs at the top. If you want to browse the headings in your document, you can do it that way. In this case, you're going to see highlighted headings where the word humbug appears. You can go directly to them by clicking them. Another option is to see thumbnail representations of each of your pages. The middle tab allows you to browse the pages in your document.

If you look closer, you're going to see highlighting on those pages as well. So it's a great way to quickly go to a specific page if you wanted to. The last tabs allow you to browse through the results. Now, there are a number of options as well. You'll notice up here where we've typed in humbug, we can click the Close button. Now, this doesn't actually close the navigation pane. that's this Close button in the top right-hand corner. But when you click this one, you end the search and you can start something new now by searching the document. Just click in there and type whatever you like. Or click the drop-down, because you can use the Advanced Find, which is the Find dialog box you're accustomed to using in Word 2003, which includes Replace.

Or you could Find graphics, you could find tables, equations, footnotes, and endnotes, if they exist in the document. So if you want to see if there is any graphics in this document, click Graphics. You can see it's not really finding anything. So there is your clue. Click that little X to stop that particular search and try something different. There are some options too to consider. When you click Options at the top of this drop-down menu, you'll see the Find Options dialog box. The default is highlighting all. That's what we saw in yellow, and Incremental find is going from one to the next.

That's the default. But you can also include other options like matching the case. So if you're going to use capital letters and so on, or Find whole words only, so that you're not finding a word that's encased in another word. You'd also use the wildcards you might be accustomed to using in Word 2003, like the asterisk representing any number of characters after a certain character you might type. So all of these options are available to you here in the Find Options. Click Cancel, and we're back to the document. Now, this navigation pane is also mobile. If you go to the very top here, you'll see the four-sided arrow.

When you get to the title bar, you can click and drag it. So right now it's docked on the left, but you can move it over to the right, right on top of your document, wherever you like to see it. When you move all the way to the left and keep going, eventually it will dock into the default location in this case. You can also move to the right-hand side when you see the double arrow. You can have it take up more real estate on your screen, or less, by clicking and dragging the border to adjust its size. When you're done, just click the Close button, and there you go.

So remember, when you do a Ctrl+F keyboard shortcut, you're going to see the navigation pane. When you click the Find button in the Editing group on the Home tab of the Ribbon here, it's the same thing. If you want that old Find option, you have to click the drop-down button and choose Advanced Find, and that's what's going to open up your Find and Replace dialog box you're accustomed to using in Word 2003.

There are currently no FAQs about Migrating from Word 2003 to Word 2010.

 
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