Start learning with our library of video tutorials taught by experts. Get started

Up and Running with SpeedGrade
Illustration by Richard Downs

Using playheads to compare shots


From:

Up and Running with SpeedGrade

with Robbie Carman

Video: Using playheads to compare shots

In this movie, I want to show you how you can use multiple playheads here inside of Adobe SpeedGrade to quickly and visually match shots together. Now of course every single Timeline inside of Adobe SpeedGrade has a default or master playhead and that's this guy right here with the yellow number 1 on it. However the issue with using a single playhead when it comes time to match shots together is that you can only see an individual shot at any given time. What I mean is that you can scrub through your Timeline and sort of get an idea of the flow of shots, you can also play through the shots of course, but at any given time you can only see one shot or one frame that is underneath the playhead up here in the monitor.

Watch this entire course now—plus get access to every course in the library. Each course includes high-quality videos taught by expert instructors.

Become a member
please wait ...
Up and Running with SpeedGrade
2h 43m Beginner Oct 02, 2012

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

With Adobe SpeedGrade, editors working with the Creative Suite now have a professional-level color correction and grading application in their hands for the first time. In this course, professional colorist Robbie Carman guides colorists and video editors through this new dedicated color correction application. The course walks through the interface, and then shows how to import footage and start making primary and secondary color corrections. Discover how to use masking and create and apply looks for maximum impact. The final chapters show how to make sure your corrections match shot to shot, and how to render your final output.

Topics include:
  • Viewing clips and navigating the timeline
  • Using automatic scene detection
  • Sending a project from Premiere Pro to SpeedGrade
  • Using SpeedGrade in a stereoscopic workflow
  • Making primary contrast and color corrections
  • Creating and applying looks
  • Making secondary corrections
  • Copying corrections from shot to shot
  • Importing rendered media back into Premiere Pro
Subjects:
Video Color Correction
Software:
SpeedGrade
Author:
Robbie Carman

Using playheads to compare shots

In this movie, I want to show you how you can use multiple playheads here inside of Adobe SpeedGrade to quickly and visually match shots together. Now of course every single Timeline inside of Adobe SpeedGrade has a default or master playhead and that's this guy right here with the yellow number 1 on it. However the issue with using a single playhead when it comes time to match shots together is that you can only see an individual shot at any given time. What I mean is that you can scrub through your Timeline and sort of get an idea of the flow of shots, you can also play through the shots of course, but at any given time you can only see one shot or one frame that is underneath the playhead up here in the monitor.

But by using multiple playheads, you can visually compare multiple places on your Timeline together for purposes of matching shots together. Let me go ahead and show you how this works. First I'm going to come down to my master playhead and simply position it a little earlier in the shot, something like that. And then what I want to do is go ahead and put my mouse over this little icon at the end of the master playhead. When I do that you can see I gat a little sticky here that says, if you hold down the Ctrl or in this case the Command key since I am on a Mac and drag out you can create a new playhead, so that's exactly what I'm going to do. I want to hold down the Command or if you're on a PC the Ctrl key and then drag out from this icon and when I do a new playhead is created.

Now before I let go, I just want to show you as I position this around I can place it on any shot that I want. But I want to make sure that I have the green plus button on the playhead. Don't drag outside of the Timeline or you'll get this red X, which means that you'll be deleting that playhead. So I'm going to go ahead and position this second playhead right about there and let go. Now notice a couple of things. On the actual playhead itself is the number 2, indicating that this is the second playhead, and notice that that number 2 is not yellow like this number one, indicating that this is not a master playhead. This is just a second playhead in this Timeline.

Also up here in the monitor, I now can see both playheads. This is my first playhead or my master playhead, and this is the second playhead right here. I'm going to go ahead and repeat this process once again holding the Command or if you're on a PC the Ctrl key and dragging out to create a third playhead, then I'll do it one more time creating a fourth playhead. Now because I'm on a Mac I'm going to go head use the keyboard shortcut Command+Home key. If you are on the PC you'd use the Ctrl+Home key to snap the image in the monitor back into the viewable area. So up here in my monitor you can now see that I have all four playheads in view.

Now here's the really cool thing. If I come down to my Timeline and drag these playheads, look they all move in tandem with one and other. And if I press the spacebar to begin playback, they also play with one another. Now the reason that they're all moving together is because of these icons at the end of each playhead. This icon looks like a little play button and when all the additional playheads have an icon on them, when you move the playhead or play the playhead, all playheads will move together in tandem. However if you click on the playhead button, until becomes a stop icon, you can reposition it in the individual playhead to a frame that you want.

And this makes it really easy when you want to change the frame that you're using then compare to other shots. If you click the stop button again, it goes back to the play button and once again all of the playheads work in tandem. So once you actually position your playheads on the shots that you want, you can visually compare them. And when I am looking at these four shots I can see that the sky in this one is a little darker than the pinky sky that I have going on these shots, and I want to go ahead and fix that. So to make it change when you're using multiple playheads, simply select the shot that you want to work with in your Timeline, and then you can come down to your layers.

In this case, I want to come to this Primary layer, in which I've applied a mask, and then I'm going to go head and lighten up that sky just a touch. Something like that works pretty well. If you want a larger view of the clips that you're trying to compare, don't forget about the P key. By pressing P you can temporarily hide all the tabs at the bottom of the SpeedGrade interface. And then if you use the Command or Ctrl key if you're on a PC key, plus the Home key, you can snap the clips into a much larger view up here in the monitor, which is nice when you want to compare shots visually. Press P again to reveal the tabs at the bottom of the interface and then of course use the Command or Ctrl key plus the Home key to snap the clips back into the viewable area up here in the monitor.

So once you're done comparing shots you'll probably want to remove the actual playheads that you've added to your SpeedGrade Timeline, and to do that it's pretty easy. Simply come down to the same icon that you dragged from to create the playhead in the first place. Click and then drag off of the SpeedGrade Timeline and when you do you notice that the playhead has a red X on it. Let go to delete or remove the playhead, and simply repeat this process for all the playheads that you wish to remove from your SpeedGrade Timeline. Okay, so that's using multiple playheads inside of Adobe SpeedGrade. I think in your own project you'll find them a very useful way to visually compare shots, so that you can match those shots together.

There are currently no FAQs about Up and Running with SpeedGrade.

 
Share a link to this course

What are exercise files?

Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course. Save time by downloading the author's files instead of setting up your own files, and learn by following along with the instructor.

Can I take this course without the exercise files?

Yes! If you decide you would like the exercise files later, you can upgrade to a premium account any time.

Become a member Download sample files See plans and pricing

Please wait... please wait ...
Upgrade to get access to exercise files.

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Learn by watching, listening, and doing, Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along Premium memberships include access to all exercise files in the library.
Upgrade now


Exercise files

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

For additional information on downloading and using exercise files, watch our instructional video or read the instructions in the FAQ.

This course includes free exercise files, so you can practice while you watch the course. To access all the exercise files in our library, become a Premium Member.

join now Upgrade now

Are you sure you want to mark all the videos in this course as unwatched?

This will not affect your course history, your reports, or your certificates of completion for this course.


Mark all as unwatched Cancel

Congratulations

You have completed Up and Running with SpeedGrade.

Return to your organization's learning portal to continue training, or close this page.


OK
Become a member to add this course to a playlist

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses—and create as many playlists as you like.

Get started

Already a member?

Become a member to like this course.

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses.

Get started

Already a member?

Exercise files

Learn by watching, listening, and doing! Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along. Exercise files are available with all Premium memberships. Learn more

Get started

Already a Premium member?

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Ask a question

Thanks for contacting us.
You’ll hear from our Customer Service team within 24 hours.

Please enter the text shown below:

The classic layout automatically defaults to the latest Flash Player.

To choose a different player, hold the cursor over your name at the top right of any lynda.com page and choose Site preferencesfrom the dropdown menu.

Continue to classic layout Stay on new layout
Exercise files

Access exercise files from a button right under the course name.

Mark videos as unwatched

Remove icons showing you already watched videos if you want to start over.

Control your viewing experience

Make the video wide, narrow, full-screen, or pop the player out of the page into its own window.

Interactive transcripts

Click on text in the transcript to jump to that spot in the video. As the video plays, the relevant spot in the transcript will be highlighted.

Are you sure you want to delete this note?

No

Notes cannot be added for locked videos.

Thanks for signing up.

We’ll send you a confirmation email shortly.


Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

Keep up with news, tips, and latest courses with emails from lynda.com.

Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

   
submit Lightbox submit clicked
Terms and conditions of use

We've updated our terms and conditions (now called terms of service).Go
Review and accept our updated terms of service.