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SharePoint 2010 Getting Started

Understanding how Word works in SharePoint


From:

SharePoint 2010 Getting Started

with Simon Allardice

Video: Understanding how Word works in SharePoint

SharePoint 2010 works great with all the Office 2010 programs. And you can certainly expect that the integration between SharePoint and Office is tightest when the versions are the same. Yes, SharePoint can be used with earlier versions of Office, but 2010 to 2010 is always the way to go. Let's see a couple of examples there. If we are working with Word and SharePoint, for example, there is really a couple of ways to drive that first interaction. Am I in SharePoint wanting to do something in Word? Or am I in Word wanting to do something in SharePoint? Let's say I am in SharePoint right now and I go into a Shared Documents Library.

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SharePoint 2010 Getting Started
2h 29m Beginner May 26, 2010

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

In SharePoint 2010 Getting Started, author Simon Allardice walks through the first few hours a new user will spend with SharePoint working with Web sites, communities, content, and search. This course covers creating and using SharePoint sites, lists and libraries, how SharePoint streamlines teamwork, Office integration, and solutions for workflows and business intelligence.

Topics include:
  • Exploring the SharePoint product line
  • Creating a Web site
  • Understanding document and meeting workspaces
  • Setting site permissions
  • Working with Office 2010 and SharePoint
  • Checking documents in and out
  • Versioning documents
  • Social networking in SharePoint
Subjects:
Business Collaboration
Software:
SharePoint
Author:
Simon Allardice

Understanding how Word works in SharePoint

SharePoint 2010 works great with all the Office 2010 programs. And you can certainly expect that the integration between SharePoint and Office is tightest when the versions are the same. Yes, SharePoint can be used with earlier versions of Office, but 2010 to 2010 is always the way to go. Let's see a couple of examples there. If we are working with Word and SharePoint, for example, there is really a couple of ways to drive that first interaction. Am I in SharePoint wanting to do something in Word? Or am I in Word wanting to do something in SharePoint? Let's say I am in SharePoint right now and I go into a Shared Documents Library.

There is nothing in this library at the moment. But if I wanted to create a new document, I can either select the link here to say Add document, or I can go to my Documents section of the Ribbon and say New Document here as well, or Upload. But let's say I don't have an existing document. So I will click this New Document option. It's going to open up the default template here. Depending on how your network settings are, you may not see this. It's going to open up the default document template, which in this case is just a blank Word document.

Now, depending on how your system administrator has configured the SharePoint, you may occasionally get security prompts that you have to fill in. But at some point we should be able to just open up Word and start typing in this document. Because we opened this from SharePoint, if I were just to hit the Save button, it should prompt me that I am going to save this back into the same location that I opened it from. And that will do just fine. However, let's say that the opposite was true.

Let's say we closed down Word. We closed down SharePoint, that from an Office application, I wasn't even thinking about SharePoint when I wrote my new document. And the question is well, now how do I get it into SharePoint? Because the default for saving is just Save to my Documents Library, but that's not where I want to go. Well, here we want to look at this Backstage menu part of Office 2010. We do have the normal Save and Save As ability.

The thing you are wanting to look at here is Save & Send, which gives you a few more options: Send Using E-mail, Save to Web, Save to SharePoint. Now, if you have been saving into SharePoint already, you will see Recent Locations of document libraries and sites that you have saved to. If the site that you want to go to isn't in them, you can always select Browse for a location and click Save As. Now, what does this mean? It's still opening up our Documents Library here. Well, I can actually just give it the address of the SharePoint site that I am interested in.

Again, I could even Copy and Paste this from the browser. Typing the name of the SharePoint site, I will hit Enter. It will look at that SharePoint site. And in this case it's actually showing me the All Site Content link, allowing me to choose from the Document Libraries. I will double-click on the Shared Documents Library. I am now inside the Shared Documents Library and I just hit Save. A third way I could get content into my Documents Library is by going to the Documents section of the Ribbon and just saying Upload Document.

You have a choice here saying Upload one or Upload Multiple Documents at the same time. And this would allow you just to browse out to it, find it from your local Desktop or a shared network drive. Click OK and upload it. From that point on, your interaction should be fairly smooth. You can select one of the documents in your Document Library, and you just want to do one at a time. And click Edit Document. It opens up in Word. You make your changes. You hit Ctrl+S to save, or you just Close it down and Save. And it's saving back to that Document Library.

Now, one thing to know if you are coming from an earlier version of Office. In previous versions of Office, you actually had the ability to create a document workspace directly from Word. You can't really do that anymore. They have actually removed that from the Office applications. In fact, they have removed a lot of SharePoint site creation from the Office applications. So most of the time the relationship between Word and SharePoint is really driven from the SharePoint side, not from the Word side of things. And the idea of course is they are trying to make it as simple and as transparent as possible, that you don't really have to think about where your documents are.

It becomes as natural that they are in SharePoint as it would do if they were on your own Desktop.

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