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SharePoint 2010 Getting Started
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Saving changes in SharePoint


From:

SharePoint 2010 Getting Started

with Simon Allardice

Video: Saving changes in SharePoint

Let's talk about a pretty basic skill here. You need to get a document from your machine and save it into SharePoint. That could be a Word document, an Excel spreadsheet; it really doesn't matter. The most important thing you need here is the address of the SharePoint site. If you've never been to that site before, you need to check to make sure that you can. If you can't open up a Web browser, paste in that address and go there, you certainly won't be able to do anything to it through Office. Even if you can go to this site, do you have the permission to upload? The way to check that is to go to the Document Library you want to upload to and see, do I have the Add Document link? If you don't have permission to create a document in this library, you won't see that link.

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SharePoint 2010 Getting Started
2h 29m Beginner May 26, 2010

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

In SharePoint 2010 Getting Started, author Simon Allardice walks through the first few hours a new user will spend with SharePoint working with Web sites, communities, content, and search. This course covers creating and using SharePoint sites, lists and libraries, how SharePoint streamlines teamwork, Office integration, and solutions for workflows and business intelligence.

Topics include:
  • Exploring the SharePoint product line
  • Creating a Web site
  • Understanding document and meeting workspaces
  • Setting site permissions
  • Working with Office 2010 and SharePoint
  • Checking documents in and out
  • Versioning documents
  • Social networking in SharePoint
Subjects:
Business Collaboration
Software:
SharePoint
Author:
Simon Allardice

Saving changes in SharePoint

Let's talk about a pretty basic skill here. You need to get a document from your machine and save it into SharePoint. That could be a Word document, an Excel spreadsheet; it really doesn't matter. The most important thing you need here is the address of the SharePoint site. If you've never been to that site before, you need to check to make sure that you can. If you can't open up a Web browser, paste in that address and go there, you certainly won't be able to do anything to it through Office. Even if you can go to this site, do you have the permission to upload? The way to check that is to go to the Document Library you want to upload to and see, do I have the Add Document link? If you don't have permission to create a document in this library, you won't see that link.

The next question is where do I want to drive this from? I can get this document into SharePoint either by telling SharePoint to do something, or by telling, in this case, the Office applications. I can save it from Excel, or I can upload it from SharePoint. So, let's take the SharePoint site first thing as I am in the site. Instead of clicking Add Document, which will create the default new document, I want to go to my Documents section on the Ribbon and click the option to Upload a Document. Now when you click that option, you'll also get the ability to Upload Multiple Files.

One of the nice things about the Upload Multiple Files window is it allows you to drag and drop from Windows Explorer onto your SharePoint site. Click OK and upload this. In our case, now we have an Excel spreadsheet that's up in SharePoint. If I select this document, several of the grayed out options become available to Edit the Document, to Check it Out, to View its Properties, to delete it. If your system administrator has installed Office Web Apps - the Web-based version of four of the Office applications - you may find that by selecting the link, or the name of the file will try and open up an Office Web Apps.

Sometimes that will work; sometimes it won't. In this case, this particular spreadsheet can't be opened because it has some data validation that's not supporting the browser. So, it's offering me: Can I try and open this in Excel? Yeah, sure, with the opportunity here to open in Read-Only mode or in Edit mode. This document is now in SharePoint, which does mean that I could get rid of the one on my Desktop if I wanted to. That's not going to affect anything. It's not a link from SharePoint to my Desktop. The document is now inside SharePoint's internal databases. If I want to drive it the other way around, so for example, if I am opening up this file and from Excel I want to save it into SharePoint, I am going to drive it from the Save & Send section of my Office 2010 product, which itself has saved to SharePoint.

I can either go from existing recent locations that it knows about, or I can Browse for a specific location. That really means I highlight that, click Save As, and I need to type the address of the SharePoint site. It's really treating the SharePoint site almost as a folder. One thing that you should know about is that if you work a lot with a particular Document Library, you can decide to save this as a shortcut into your Office programs. To do this, you go into the Document Library you want to save as a shortcut.

You go to it's Library Tools > Library section and in the option that says Connect to Office, you can say Add it to SharePoint site, add a shortcut to this library in Microsoft Office. That little pop-up here saying Library added. That might take a few minutes to appear, but you'll find as you start to open Office programs in the future, that when you go to your Save & Send section Save to SharePoint, that it will actually be added as a Location in your Office program.

So, while there are a variety of ways of getting your content into a SharePoint Document Library, It really doesn't matter all that much which one you pick.

There are currently no FAQs about SharePoint 2010 Getting Started.

 
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