New Feature: Playlist Center! Pick a topic and let our playlists guide the way.

Start learning with our library of video tutorials taught by experts. Get started

SQL Server Reporting Services in Depth
Illustration by

Using and configuring gauges


From:

SQL Server Reporting Services in Depth

with Simon Allardice

Video: Using and configuring gauges

Think about a gauge in real life, a fuel gauge on your car, a battery gauge on a cell phone. A gauge does represent a value, but you don't actually care what that value explicitly is; you care about its proportion. Am I full, am I half full, am I nearly empty? So I'm going to add a gauge to this table here. First, I'll add a new column to put the gauge in. So selecting anywhere in the table, grab the grab handle for this particular column, right-click it, and insert one to the right. I'll drag it a little wider because I want a bit more space.
Expand all | Collapse all
  1. 12m 6s
    1. Welcome
      1m 9s
    2. What you need to know
      1m 36s
    3. Exploring SQL Server Reporting Services components
      4m 17s
    4. Reviewing SQL Server versions
      5m 4s
  2. 49m 41s
    1. The elements of a report
      3m 10s
    2. Creating a report with Report Builder
      12m 11s
    3. Grouping table regions on a report
      6m 1s
    4. Joining data from multiple tables
      4m 33s
    5. Formatting report elements
      4m 34s
    6. Using functions in a report
      11m 0s
    7. Displaying data in a matrix
      8m 12s
  3. 24m 9s
    1. Filtering data and adding parameters to a report
      5m 35s
    2. Customizing report parameters
      5m 4s
    3. Sorting data in a data region
      4m 7s
    4. Applying interactive sorting
      4m 57s
    5. Creating a drillthrough action to connect reports
      4m 26s
  4. 49m 57s
    1. Introduction to charting in Reporting Services
      4m 16s
    2. Creating a column chart
      8m 35s
    3. Adding a generated average to a chart
      4m 5s
    4. Creating a pie chart
      8m 19s
    5. Using sparklines
      6m 38s
    6. Adding a sparkline to a drilldown matrix
      14m 34s
    7. Adding data bars
      3m 30s
  5. 21m 48s
    1. Adding indicators to a report
      7m 52s
    2. Using and configuring gauges
      5m 30s
    3. Using maps in Reporting Services
      8m 26s
  6. 38m 14s
    1. Creating modular reports with report parts
      4m 36s
    2. Adding and updating report parts
      4m 37s
    3. Using subreports and nested regions
      4m 28s
    4. Configuring headers and footers
      3m 9s
    5. Printing and exporting reports
      3m 45s
    6. Using page breaks
      5m 37s
    7. Creating and using shared data sources
      8m 11s
    8. Creating and using shared data sets
      3m 51s
  7. 27m 20s
    1. Organizing reports in Report Manager
      3m 1s
    2. Adding users and configuring report security
      5m 24s
    3. Configuring subscriptions
      5m 13s
    4. Creating a linked report
      4m 8s
    5. Using Report Designer in SQL Server Data Tools
      9m 34s
  8. 1m 2s
    1. Goodbye
      1m 2s

Watch this entire course now—plus get access to every course in the library. Each course includes high-quality videos taught by expert instructors.

Become a member
please wait ...
SQL Server Reporting Services in Depth
3h 44m Advanced Dec 13, 2012

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

Discover how to create, manage, and deliver interactive reports—not just to print, but to dynamically explore enterprise-level data—with Reporting Services in SQL Server. In this course, author Simon Allardice concentrates on using Report Builder to build and format reports from a variety of data sources, but also shows how to perform basic administration tasks such as granting user access and organizing reports in the Report Manager. Plus, learn how to add interactive sorting and filtering functionality to your reports, and create column and pie charts to better express your data.

Note: These tutorials are applicable to both the 2008 and 2012 versions of SQL Server.

Topics include:
  • Understanding the elements of a report
  • Grouping table regions
  • Joining data from multiple tables
  • Displaying data in a matrix
  • Customizing report parameters
  • Filtering and sorting data
  • Creating charts
  • Adding sparklines and data bars
  • Creating at-a-glance reports with indicators
  • Using Maps in Reporting Services
  • Configuring report security
  • Printing and exporting reports
Subjects:
Developer Databases
Software:
SQL Server
Author:
Simon Allardice

Using and configuring gauges

Think about a gauge in real life, a fuel gauge on your car, a battery gauge on a cell phone. A gauge does represent a value, but you don't actually care what that value explicitly is; you care about its proportion. Am I full, am I half full, am I nearly empty? So I'm going to add a gauge to this table here. First, I'll add a new column to put the gauge in. So selecting anywhere in the table, grab the grab handle for this particular column, right-click it, and insert one to the right. I'll drag it a little wider because I want a bit more space.

I'm going to add a gauge into this particular cell because I want it per row for the information that I'm getting about the territories. It's added just like sparklines and data bars and indicators. I go over to the Insert section, select Gauge, click it once, and then come over here and just single-click in the cell. And we have a variety of gauges appear just like we'd have a variety of sparklines or a variety of charts. Several fuel style gauges, linear gauges, thermometer-style gauges, and so on.

Because I'm inserting this gauge into a table, I'm going to go left to right rather than up and down. So, I'm going to select the very last option, which is called Bullet Graph here, and click OK. Now, it's a little squished here, and you will find that gauges in Reporting Services really do expect a bit more room than, say, just a simple indicator or a value. So, I'm going to drag the column a little bit wider, just so we can see more of it here. And what I'm going to make this gauge represent is, say, a $10 million bonus contest, where the sales year to date is going to push this pointer up and down somewhere in the scale.

Now, just like working with indicators, the gauge is only going to display one value, and that's going to be represented by what's called the pointer here. But the same way that an indicator displays one value but it has to be told whether that's good or bad, the pointer displays one value but needs to be told where on the scale that goes. Well, the first thing we do is configure the pointer. When you're working with gauges, you have to be very careful what you have clicked, because as I click around, I can get the Linear Gauge option here I see on the Properties window.

If I click somewhere else in it, I can get a linear range. I can get a linear scale. I can get a LinearRange1. I can get the pointer again. So, it can be difficult to actually find what you're looking for. Right now I want the pointer. So I'm clicking in here until I see this LinearPointer show up, and I can see the highlight around it. What I'm looking for is to be able to right-click it and see Pointer Properties. This is where I can set the value of the pointer. What should this be fueled by? And I'm just going to connect it to Sales Year To Date and click OK.

If I close my Properties panel here, you'll see that I also have Gauge Data popping up on the right-hand side the same as with an indicator or a chart. You can also drag and drop there. Well, is this enough? Let's find out. I'll go ahead and click Run. I'm getting the gauge show up, but the problem is it's pushing out to 100% for every single one of them, because the number I'm giving it is just a little bit too big for the scale, which is oriented to 0 through 100%. So, back into Design view, because I need to change something else.

The pointer is fine. I need to change the scale. So I click around till I find the Scale area. It's sometimes helpful to have your Properties window open so you can see this linear scale. Another clue is by right-clicking. What I had a moment ago was Pointer Properties, what I want to see now is Scale Properties. Select that, and we have several options here. The main thing we're interested in to make it show up correctly is, what are our minimum and maximum ranges, and they are defaulted to 0 through 100. Well, that's not what we want, because we're giving it a value that could be 10 million.

And in fact, 10 million is the max. That's what we're going for is that 10 million bonus. So, I'm actually going to just type directly in the number 10 million and click OK. We'll run this again, and actually, we have the pointer correct now. The problem is, the labels look absolutely terrible. So, back to the drawing board, into Design view. Click Scale again. We're clicking around a little bit till we find it. I want the Scale properties. Our Minimum and Maximum are fine. I do have the options in the Labels section to actually just turn them off.

If I select the labels of their properties, I can say Hide scale labels, and they just disappear, and that might be fine. Without the labels, I could close that row up a little bit so it isn't as big as it was before. But another option that I have is just changing the format of what the labels show. So, I'm going to come down to the Number section and say that this label should show up as a number. And one of the options I have here is to check the Show values in and say Millions. We take it to Millions, but even as I'm clicking around, I can see it's doing 4.00, 6.00.

I really don't need the decimal places, so I'll get rid of those. And now the tick marks represent how far we are up on a $10 million scale. There are other options here, such as getting rid of the minor tick marks or the major tick marks. With this being a little cleaner, I can shrink that column just a bit more, and we'll go ahead and run it. Now, we can tell at a glance who is up at the top of the scale and who is nowhere near that top. So, experiment with the other options. Be careful when you're working with gauges, that you have the right thing selected at the right time.

This is how you provide indicators and gauges on your reports.

There are currently no FAQs about SQL Server Reporting Services in Depth.

 
Share a link to this course

What are exercise files?

Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course. Save time by downloading the author's files instead of setting up your own files, and learn by following along with the instructor.

Can I take this course without the exercise files?

Yes! If you decide you would like the exercise files later, you can upgrade to a premium account any time.

Become a member Download sample files See plans and pricing

Please wait... please wait ...
Upgrade to get access to exercise files.

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Learn by watching, listening, and doing, Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along Premium memberships include access to all exercise files in the library.
Upgrade now


Exercise files

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

For additional information on downloading and using exercise files, watch our instructional video or read the instructions in the FAQ.

This course includes free exercise files, so you can practice while you watch the course. To access all the exercise files in our library, become a Premium Member.

join now Upgrade now

Are you sure you want to mark all the videos in this course as unwatched?

This will not affect your course history, your reports, or your certificates of completion for this course.


Mark all as unwatched Cancel

Congratulations

You have completed SQL Server Reporting Services in Depth.

Return to your organization's learning portal to continue training, or close this page.


OK
Become a member to add this course to a playlist

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses—and create as many playlists as you like.

Get started

Already a member?

Become a member to like this course.

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses.

Get started

Already a member?

Exercise files

Learn by watching, listening, and doing! Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along. Exercise files are available with all Premium memberships. Learn more

Get started

Already a Premium member?

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Ask a question

Thanks for contacting us.
You’ll hear from our Customer Service team within 24 hours.

Please enter the text shown below:

The classic layout automatically defaults to the latest Flash Player.

To choose a different player, hold the cursor over your name at the top right of any lynda.com page and choose Site preferencesfrom the dropdown menu.

Continue to classic layout Stay on new layout
Exercise files

Access exercise files from a button right under the course name.

Mark videos as unwatched

Remove icons showing you already watched videos if you want to start over.

Control your viewing experience

Make the video wide, narrow, full-screen, or pop the player out of the page into its own window.

Interactive transcripts

Click on text in the transcript to jump to that spot in the video. As the video plays, the relevant spot in the transcript will be highlighted.

Are you sure you want to delete this note?

No

Notes cannot be added for locked videos.

Thanks for signing up.

We’ll send you a confirmation email shortly.


Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

Keep up with news, tips, and latest courses with emails from lynda.com.

Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

   
submit Lightbox submit clicked
Terms and conditions of use

We've updated our terms and conditions (now called terms of service).Go
Review and accept our updated terms of service.