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SQL Server: Triggers, Stored Procedures, and Functions
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Getting return values


From:

SQL Server: Triggers, Stored Procedures, and Functions

with Martin Guidry

Video: Getting return values

I mentioned earlier to you a recommendation that as a best practice; every stored procedure return a value indicating success or failure. Typically, we return a 0 for failure and the 1 for success. We haven't yet implemented that. So let's go ahead and work on it. I'll change this code that creates a stored procedure into a code that alters a stored procedure. The last allow will be RETURN 1 for success. We also need to define some failure condition. As a hypothetical, we're going to say that if the first name is too short, let's say extremely short, less than two characters, we'll define that as a failure condition.
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  1. 2m 15s
    1. Welcome
      51s
    2. What you should know
      51s
    3. Using the exercise files
      33s
  2. 11m 1s
    1. Comparing triggers, functions, and procedures
      3m 25s
    2. Why use a stored procedure?
      4m 59s
    3. Why use functions?
      1m 27s
    4. Why use triggers?
      1m 10s
  3. 6m 2s
    1. Configuring your environment
      4m 53s
    2. Downloading and installing a sample database
      1m 9s
  4. 26m 25s
    1. Creating a stored procedure
      2m 46s
    2. Modifying a stored procedure
      2m 34s
    3. Returning data using data sets
      3m 45s
    4. Returning data using cursors
      3m 45s
    5. Using input and output parameters
      5m 24s
    6. Using security and permissions
      5m 24s
    7. Using transactions
      2m 47s
  5. 11m 56s
    1. Creating a user-defined function
      4m 59s
    2. Exploring single-value functions
      4m 18s
    3. Exploring table value functions
      2m 39s
  6. 9m 31s
    1. Using "after" triggers
      3m 47s
    2. Using "instead of" triggers
      2m 9s
    3. Using nested triggers
      1m 38s
    4. Using database-level triggers
      1m 57s
  7. 12m 43s
    1. Exploring a real-world INSERT procedure
      5m 32s
    2. Exploring a real-world UPDATE procedure
      3m 13s
    3. Implementing logging on DELETE
      3m 58s
  8. 19m 38s
    1. Understanding the Common Language Runtime (CLR) and the .NET framework
      1m 52s
    2. Using CLR with SQL Server 2012
      4m 11s
    3. Writing stored procedures with C# .NET
      5m 51s
    4. Writing functions with .NET
      5m 7s
    5. Choosing between T-SQL vs. CLR
      2m 37s
  9. 11m 34s
    1. Creating a basic web form and connecting to a database
      2m 56s
    2. Executing a stored procedure
      2m 4s
    3. Passing parameters
      3m 41s
    4. Getting return values
      2m 53s
  10. 1m 43s
    1. Next steps
      1m 43s

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SQL Server: Triggers, Stored Procedures, and Functions
1h 52m Advanced Sep 24, 2012

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

This course investigates several key database-programming concepts: triggers, stored procedures, functions, and .NET CLR (Common Language Runtime) assemblies. Author Martin Guidry shows how to combine these techniques and create a high-quality database using Microsoft SQL Server 2012. The course also covers real-world uses of the INSERT, UPDATE, and DELETE procedures, and how to build a basic web form to connect to your database.

Topics include:
  • Comparing triggers, functions, and stored procedures
  • Installing and configuring SQL Server
  • Creating a stored procedure
  • Returning data using data sets
  • Creating user-defined functions
  • Using "after," "instead," and nested triggers
  • Modifying existing stored procedures
  • Implementing logging on DELETE
  • Choosing between T-SQL and CLR
  • Executing a stored procedure
  • Passing parameters
Subjects:
Developer Databases
Software:
SQL Server
Author:
Martin Guidry

Getting return values

I mentioned earlier to you a recommendation that as a best practice; every stored procedure return a value indicating success or failure. Typically, we return a 0 for failure and the 1 for success. We haven't yet implemented that. So let's go ahead and work on it. I'll change this code that creates a stored procedure into a code that alters a stored procedure. The last allow will be RETURN 1 for success. We also need to define some failure condition. As a hypothetical, we're going to say that if the first name is too short, let's say extremely short, less than two characters, we'll define that as a failure condition.

Check for the if len(@FirstName). If it's less than 2 characters, that is now defined as a failure condition. So we'll need to RETURN a 0 to indicate this stored procedure was unsuccessful. And as soon as it hits that line of RETURN 0, it will not execute the bottom. It will not do the insert. Command(s) completed successfully. That's good news. Now we need to go over to our website and do a little more work. In order to accept that return value we're going to have to create a new parameter.

So websites accept return values from stored procedures as a special type of parameter. I have some code already written in your exercise files. I'm going to insert that now. There is one chunk that goes right before the connection.open and another chunk they goes right after connection.close. Now let's look at what this code does. The top part creates a new parameter called returnParameter, and it sets an unusual direction on that. For every parameter we have the choice to set a direction.

Our choices are Input, Output, both Input and Output, or the one I'm going to choose ReturnValue. And this line just adds the parameter to the existing commands. Below the close, I added some code that reads the value of the return value and checks to see if it's equal to 0. If it is in fact equal to 0, that is an error condition and I'm going to put a label on the screen that will hold the message this is an error in the stored procedure. So I'll need to come back over to the graphical port and drag a Label right next to the button.

I'll go ahead and run this, and I'm going to intentionally enter some bad data. So for the first name I'll make sure does in fact too short and we receive the message there was an error in the stored procedure. It did not do the insert and instead did what we expected. It returned a 0 to us indicating the stored procedure had failed. So this follows a common best practice of using a 0 to indicate failure, a 1 to indicate success, and every stored procedure should always return either success or failure.

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