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SQL Server: Triggers, Stored Procedures, and Functions
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Creating a stored procedure


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SQL Server: Triggers, Stored Procedures, and Functions

with Martin Guidry

Video: Creating a stored procedure

I'd like to talk to you little bit about creating stored procedures in Microsoft SQL Server. To do this we're going to start of with the keyword CREATE and then the keyword PROCEDURE. After that we need to give it a name. Well, we have lots of options on naming. Almost any combination of letters and numbers and punctuation marks will work. One of the few exceptions is you are not allowed to start with a numeral. So if I try to type in numerals at the beginning, the machine will get upset with that and put that little red squiggly line in there.
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  1. 2m 15s
    1. Welcome
      51s
    2. What you should know
      51s
    3. Using the exercise files
      33s
  2. 11m 1s
    1. Comparing triggers, functions, and procedures
      3m 25s
    2. Why use a stored procedure?
      4m 59s
    3. Why use functions?
      1m 27s
    4. Why use triggers?
      1m 10s
  3. 6m 2s
    1. Configuring your environment
      4m 53s
    2. Downloading and installing a sample database
      1m 9s
  4. 26m 25s
    1. Creating a stored procedure
      2m 46s
    2. Modifying a stored procedure
      2m 34s
    3. Returning data using data sets
      3m 45s
    4. Returning data using cursors
      3m 45s
    5. Using input and output parameters
      5m 24s
    6. Using security and permissions
      5m 24s
    7. Using transactions
      2m 47s
  5. 11m 56s
    1. Creating a user-defined function
      4m 59s
    2. Exploring single-value functions
      4m 18s
    3. Exploring table value functions
      2m 39s
  6. 9m 31s
    1. Using "after" triggers
      3m 47s
    2. Using "instead of" triggers
      2m 9s
    3. Using nested triggers
      1m 38s
    4. Using database-level triggers
      1m 57s
  7. 12m 43s
    1. Exploring a real-world INSERT procedure
      5m 32s
    2. Exploring a real-world UPDATE procedure
      3m 13s
    3. Implementing logging on DELETE
      3m 58s
  8. 19m 38s
    1. Understanding the Common Language Runtime (CLR) and the .NET framework
      1m 52s
    2. Using CLR with SQL Server 2012
      4m 11s
    3. Writing stored procedures with C# .NET
      5m 51s
    4. Writing functions with .NET
      5m 7s
    5. Choosing between T-SQL vs. CLR
      2m 37s
  9. 11m 34s
    1. Creating a basic web form and connecting to a database
      2m 56s
    2. Executing a stored procedure
      2m 4s
    3. Passing parameters
      3m 41s
    4. Getting return values
      2m 53s
  10. 1m 43s
    1. Next steps
      1m 43s

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SQL Server: Triggers, Stored Procedures, and Functions
1h 52m Advanced Sep 24, 2012

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

This course investigates several key database-programming concepts: triggers, stored procedures, functions, and .NET CLR (Common Language Runtime) assemblies. Author Martin Guidry shows how to combine these techniques and create a high-quality database using Microsoft SQL Server 2012. The course also covers real-world uses of the INSERT, UPDATE, and DELETE procedures, and how to build a basic web form to connect to your database.

Topics include:
  • Comparing triggers, functions, and stored procedures
  • Installing and configuring SQL Server
  • Creating a stored procedure
  • Returning data using data sets
  • Creating user-defined functions
  • Using "after," "instead," and nested triggers
  • Modifying existing stored procedures
  • Implementing logging on DELETE
  • Choosing between T-SQL and CLR
  • Executing a stored procedure
  • Passing parameters
Subjects:
Developer Databases
Software:
SQL Server
Author:
Martin Guidry

Creating a stored procedure

I'd like to talk to you little bit about creating stored procedures in Microsoft SQL Server. To do this we're going to start of with the keyword CREATE and then the keyword PROCEDURE. After that we need to give it a name. Well, we have lots of options on naming. Almost any combination of letters and numbers and punctuation marks will work. One of the few exceptions is you are not allowed to start with a numeral. So if I try to type in numerals at the beginning, the machine will get upset with that and put that little red squiggly line in there.

That is because you're not allowed to start with numerals. You are allowed to end with numerals or have numerals anywhere else in the name. But just as a matter of preference I typically avoid both punctuation marks and numerals and go with just text. Once we've decided on a name we will need the keyword AS and the keyword BEGIN. I typically put those on separate lines, but that's not necessary. You could put all of this on one line. I just find it makes it a little easier to read spaced out like this. After BEGIN, we have to actually do the work of the stored procedure and just about any T-SQL statement is valid.

We're going to start off easy and just do a very simple one line that will return some text. Then in single quotes the word hello. At the end of the stored procedure we need to type in the keyword END and that signifies to the machine this is the end of our stored procedure. We will then click on the red exclamation point for Execute and we get at the bottom a green check mark that says Query executed successfully, and the phrase command completed successfully.

So it would certainly seem as we were successful. We've got two forms of positive feedback. The stored procedure is now stored in our database. We can see that by expanding the myDatabase menu to the left. Then we expand Programmability. Inside of there we will have Stored Procedures. It's not coming up yet. I bet if I click Refresh, there it is, a stored procedure called myTest. So there we can see the stored procedure exists. The next logical thing to do would be to execute the stored procedure, and in order to execute you can just type in the keyword EXECUTE and then the name of the stored procedure, click the red exclamation point again and we see our data returned to us.

We ask the stored procedure to return the word hello. It did in fact return the word hello. So it seems as if things are going well for us. The keyword execute can be abbreviated. You can type in just EXEC and it will accomplish the exact same thing. So that's an alternative way to execute our stored procedure. So these are the basics of creating a stored procedure. In the next section we will work on modifying a stored procedure.

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