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Introducing solids

From: Rhino 4 Essential Training

Video: Introducing solids

In this video, we'll review the three different ways to create solid geometry mostly from existing entities. Rhino calls these resulting objects solids, but you may also be familiar with the term primitives from other 3D software apps, which I'll use interchangeably. A reminder on the terminology: a solid created using these commands ideally results in a finished and completely closed entity, but you're always free to build a solid one curve or surface at a time. Okay. Let's spin around the backside here and take a look at some of the setups.

Introducing solids

In this video, we'll review the three different ways to create solid geometry mostly from existing entities. Rhino calls these resulting objects solids, but you may also be familiar with the term primitives from other 3D software apps, which I'll use interchangeably. A reminder on the terminology: a solid created using these commands ideally results in a finished and completely closed entity, but you're always free to build a solid one curve or surface at a time. Okay. Let's spin around the backside here and take a look at some of the setups.

We're going to build a jet pack starting with curves then some surfaces and some solids. Let's take a sneak preview at what the jet pack might look like. So, there's our twin engine rocket pack. Let's turn that back off. We'll start in reverse order. I am going to end up with the solid from curves, which is actually the recommended method, and you'll see why in just a minute. Okay. And let's go to the Solid menu and select Cylinder and I've got my Intersections snap on here. That's a no snap.

So, we can go right to the center of those two lines, and I am going to type in some numbers here just so everything kind of looks consistent. So, I am going to type in for Radius 10 and then of course, you can always move it up and eyeball the final height. I am going to go ahead and type 40. So, we've just made a cylinder primitive. That's the quickest and easiest way but also is the most restrictive as far as going backwards in time.

Let me show you a quick example what might happen if I were to delete this or make a change to it later. Unless I had remembered the radius and distance, I could not regenerate that and resume work. So, that's why I recommend that you start from either a curve or a surface. Let's check those out. This is a flat plane that happens to be round. So, we'll check out Solid > Extrude Surface > Straight. I want to just click that one surface, hit right-click to enter and go up, again typing in 40, just the old match.

Now one quick note here. That surface, which used to be separate, is now joined and we have an additional copy of it on the bottom. So, let's try it with another surface that is not flat on the construction plane. Solid > Extrude Surface > Straight and I'll type in 40. You notice that it works just as well, the key being here that the original surface was on a flat plane, so it can only be extruded forward or backwards in a single direction but not a problem.

Here is where it gets a little bit tricky. I want to pick a deformed surface. It does look like a circle from the top view. Let's repeat the command again, Solid > Extrude Surface > Straight, and now since that originating or generating surface was bent, Rhino is just defaulting to the construction plane, so the extrusion just goes up vertically, and I'll type in 40 again. Let's see what we get. So, it does close it off, but that cap is not attached.

All right. Let's look at the final case where we create from curves. This is the recommended approach. Let's take this curve here, highlight it go to Solid > Extrude Planar Curve > Straight, type in 40. So, now we have a completely enclosed solid form and notice we have the curve still there separate. It's not included in the set. It's not joined together. That is ideal if I ever make any changes to this or throw it away and start over.

I've got that curve and so I don't have to remember what its exact radius was. I just have the existing geometry there as reference. It's always the way to go if possible. I'll just do one more Extrude Planar Curve > Straight, not a problem since it was on a flat plane, but here is our bent shape just for comparison. So, I've got a seam on there. Let's see what happens. Solid > Extrude Curve > Straight.

It said planar curve, but it looks like it's still working. However, when I go up to 40, I wasn't able to cap it. So, you can see the difference here. This was a single flat surface, and that's just not possible since this curve is bent. It would actually be two. So, the best it can do is go up vertically from the construction plane and then it ends up being open, so you would have to manually close that off. So, the Solid commands are very simple and fast to work with, but they can quickly introduce limitations if you're concerned about the ability to reverse or undo multiple complex steps or simply just explore multiple design options.

So, if that's the case and you still prefer to use solids, then try to build from curves, since you have a record of your construction geometry, and then you can quickly regenerate your forms if there's a change. And you know it will change!

Show transcript

This video is part of

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Rhino 4 Essential Training

67 video lessons · 16706 viewers

Dave Schultze
Author

 
Expand all | Collapse all
  1. 4m 13s
    1. Welcome
      1m 1s
    2. Using the exercise files
      28s
    3. Recommended hardware
      2m 44s
  2. 19m 8s
    1. Understanding the three types of entities: curves, surfaces, and solids
      5m 51s
    2. Comparing Bezier curves, B-splines, and NURBS objects
      3m 35s
    3. Comparing isocurve surfaces and mesh surfaces
      4m 50s
    4. Setting measurement units and tolerance
      4m 52s
  3. 18m 16s
    1. Introducing the viewport
      3m 20s
    2. Using construction planes to anchor model design
      5m 27s
    3. Changing the way a model is viewed using shading modes
      3m 11s
    4. Navigating the viewport with pan, zoom, rotate, and reset controls
      3m 24s
    5. Exploring help options
      2m 54s
  4. 29m 48s
    1. Understanding Rhino's command philosophy
      3m 10s
    2. Using toolbars and docking buttons to a toolbar
      3m 33s
    3. Navigating the geometry menus using a "department store" analogy
      3m 35s
    4. Using the command line and status bar to get feedback
      4m 56s
    5. Modifying the nudge control and setting other preferences
      6m 54s
    6. Using the Properties window
      3m 1s
    7. Opening and saving files
      4m 39s
  5. 14m 24s
    1. Creating basic objects: curves, surfaces, and solids
      4m 22s
    2. Performing basic transformations
      3m 14s
    3. Selecting objects
      3m 37s
    4. Organizing a project using layers
      3m 11s
  6. 21m 18s
    1. Understanding lines and polylines
      4m 10s
    2. Building rectangles and polygons
      5m 12s
    3. Creating arcs, circles, and ellipses
      7m 8s
    4. Drawing freeform curves
      4m 48s
  7. 47m 36s
    1. Comparing different types of 3D surfaces
      7m 11s
    2. Extruding surfaces to create features in a model
      8m 58s
    3. Creating surfaces with lofts
      7m 49s
    4. Using Revolve and Rail Revolve to create surfaces
      7m 42s
    5. Using Sweep Rail to create a 3D claw
      7m 49s
    6. Creating complex surface shapes using Network Surface
      8m 7s
  8. 46m 48s
    1. Introducing solids
      5m 42s
    2. Making solids with primitives
      5m 41s
    3. Extruding curves to create solids without primitives
      8m 59s
    4. Creating unique shapes with the union, difference, and intersection Boolean operators
      6m 46s
    5. Troubleshooting solids and Booleans
      8m 53s
    6. Editing with the solid edit tools
      6m 20s
    7. Creating and transforming holes in solids
      4m 27s
  9. 27m 8s
    1. Understanding Rhino's modeling aids
      3m 59s
    2. Working with the Grid Snap modeling aid
      2m 22s
    3. Using the Ortho modeling aid
      3m 4s
    4. Using the Planar modeling aid
      2m 4s
    5. Incorporating the Osnap modeling aid into your workflow
      6m 7s
    6. Understanding the Project and Smart Track modeling aids
      4m 42s
    7. Setting cursor constraints
      4m 50s
  10. 50m 14s
    1. Editing corners with Fillet and Chamfer
      7m 38s
    2. Trimming and splitting with curve Booleans
      5m 37s
    3. Moving and rotating objects with the Drag and Nudge tools
      7m 24s
    4. Copying and pasting objects
      4m 10s
    5. Understanding how Rhino uses Undo and Redo
      3m 42s
    6. Grouping objects
      3m 21s
    7. Scaling objects
      6m 40s
    8. Duplicating objects using the Mirror command
      6m 36s
    9. Making copies and structured sets using arrays
      5m 6s
  11. 20m 37s
    1. Using the Analysis toolbar to understand characteristics of a model
      6m 14s
    2. Defining degrees of curve and surfaces
      6m 6s
    3. Using Rebuild and Change Degree
      8m 17s
  12. 26m 21s
    1. Measuring and labeling values on a model using dimensioning
      5m 22s
    2. Creating screen captures for quick proofs
      5m 16s
    3. Creating 2D views of a 3D model
      6m 44s
    4. Rendering a project
      8m 59s
  13. 22m 5s
    1. Preparing a model for prototyping by confirming that all gaps are closed
      5m 17s
    2. Using the "shelling" technique to create wall thickness
      10m 54s
    3. Exporting to the STL format for 3D printing
      5m 54s
  14. 14s
    1. Goodbye
      14s

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