New Feature: Playlist Center! Pick a topic and let our playlists guide the way.

Easy-to-follow video tutorials help you learn software, creative, and business skills.Become a member

Duplicating objects using the Mirror command

From: Rhino 4 Essential Training

Video: Duplicating objects using the Mirror command

Next up, we will talk about the Mirror command and how best to use it. This command is ideal for any symmetrical geometry, whether it's a curve, surface, or even a completed solid. It's also a big time-saver, since you only have to build half or even a quarter of the geometry and let Mirror do the rest. Even better, it provides complete accuracy since you know that each side matches the other side. We will just start off by making a mirror copy of the robot arm, but it's important to have an axis setup. So, in this case, I have got this line down the center. Let's go ahead and maximize the Front viewport.

Duplicating objects using the Mirror command

Next up, we will talk about the Mirror command and how best to use it. This command is ideal for any symmetrical geometry, whether it's a curve, surface, or even a completed solid. It's also a big time-saver, since you only have to build half or even a quarter of the geometry and let Mirror do the rest. Even better, it provides complete accuracy since you know that each side matches the other side. We will just start off by making a mirror copy of the robot arm, but it's important to have an axis setup. So, in this case, I have got this line down the center. Let's go ahead and maximize the Front viewport.

I am going to start the Mirror command by finding it under Transform > Mirror. Objects to mirror are the arm. Enter. Now, we are going to have to snap the two endpoints of that line or axis down the center. So, make sure your snappings are correct. I have got Endpoint, which will work. I'll snap here. And if I don't have another endpoint to snap to, it's very easy to let something misalign. So, let's snap to this endpoint. So, I know that this is copied, flipped over and exact equal distance on the other side of that Mirror plane.

Let's do it one more time with the leg. I will just select. I am going to right-click to repeat the command and just define the Mirror with the same two points. Let's check out the Mirror command on some curves and see how it works differently. I'm going to go to the Top viewport, maximize that, zoom out and then hide some curve geometry. I'm going to select this curve and do a quick Mirror command and then talk about some potential problems.

Just snap the two endpoints, and notice we get a kind of a pinch here. I will show you the reason why that can happen and how to fix it. The last two control points are not perpendicular to the axis. So, anytime that happens, you can end up with a situation where it'll pinch or out, and you'll probably want it to be a smooth flowing transition over the top. So, let's delete this other side and I'll show you the fix. I have drawn a construction line from one of the control points going in perpendicular to the axis.

We just grab the last point and make sure it aligns. So, I'm going to drag and it should snap to the endpoint. There. Now, these two are in perfect alignment. We will zoom out and repeat the command. I am going to turn control points off with F11. Start Transform > Mirror. Object, right-click to two points. So, those should now flow perfectly smoothly as if you've drawn them in this one single curve all the way through. Okay.

Let's show the next logical step where we have taken the curves and we are going to extrude them into a surface. I'll show you another tip. I go to the Perspective viewport and zoom in on these two curves. I am going to select them both and do a quick Surface > Extrude and talk about some potential problems. Notice the thick edge here. These are two separate surfaces because they were generated from two separate lines. So even if we join them together, which they will, they will still have a little bit of a kink, as small as that may be.

I'm going to show you an improved method. After a Mirror, it's one extra step, but it prevents this problem from having. Okay, so after the Mirror has been completed, we are just going to join the two lines, the Join command here on the main menu. I am going to turn the control points on. So, this is now one curve. You can even delete this point in the center that is shared from these two sides with only a minor modification of the surface. Let's turn the control points off and ere- extrude that one more time and check it out.

So, notice no seam and that should much smoother for the final project. Okay. Let's talk about a related command which is called Symmetry, which does pretty much the same thing as Mirror but lets you continue to tweak it and update the other side. I am going to start the command here by selecting the object, going to Transform > Symmetry. It's right next to Mirror. Now, in this command you need to turn on what's called Record History.

It's very easy to forget. So, you can do that before or after the command starts, and I am going to define the plane with two points. Now, it looks like that same things has happened, nothing different. However, when I select the curve, F10 to turn on the control points, the other side updates. Occasionally, you can't really visualize how the whole thing will look with only half the points selected. So, this will update both sides. We can even do the same thing with the surface in this next example.

I have got it off with the plane just to show how powerful it can be. Start the command, Transform > Symmetry, turn on Record History. Select an edge of this surface or curve and then define this plane one more time. We are going to snap to both points. Notice how it flows across and maintains perfect smoothness. Let's verify that by highlighting the finished surface and turning the control points on and see what we can do.

I will grab this point here and just kind of pull it around. You see the other side update. It might be easier if I grab some points back here. I am going to use the arrow keys to nudge them. It will continually update both sides and even move other points as necessary to maintain that perfect smoothness and continuity. Now, one word of warning. As soon as you move either the axis or the surface, you have broken the relationship.

You can actually go work on other parts of the model and come back here. And as long as the relationship has not changed, it will continue to update. So, the Mirror and Symmetry commands are both ideal ways to build symmetrical geometry quickly and with guarantied accuracy. The Symmetry command does give you the extra ability to continue tweaking while seeing the final result, but remember, once you move the part away from axis, the Symmetry connection is lost.

Show transcript

This video is part of

Image for Rhino 4 Essential Training
Rhino 4 Essential Training

67 video lessons · 16706 viewers

Dave Schultze
Author

 
Expand all | Collapse all
  1. 4m 13s
    1. Welcome
      1m 1s
    2. Using the exercise files
      28s
    3. Recommended hardware
      2m 44s
  2. 19m 8s
    1. Understanding the three types of entities: curves, surfaces, and solids
      5m 51s
    2. Comparing Bezier curves, B-splines, and NURBS objects
      3m 35s
    3. Comparing isocurve surfaces and mesh surfaces
      4m 50s
    4. Setting measurement units and tolerance
      4m 52s
  3. 18m 16s
    1. Introducing the viewport
      3m 20s
    2. Using construction planes to anchor model design
      5m 27s
    3. Changing the way a model is viewed using shading modes
      3m 11s
    4. Navigating the viewport with pan, zoom, rotate, and reset controls
      3m 24s
    5. Exploring help options
      2m 54s
  4. 29m 48s
    1. Understanding Rhino's command philosophy
      3m 10s
    2. Using toolbars and docking buttons to a toolbar
      3m 33s
    3. Navigating the geometry menus using a "department store" analogy
      3m 35s
    4. Using the command line and status bar to get feedback
      4m 56s
    5. Modifying the nudge control and setting other preferences
      6m 54s
    6. Using the Properties window
      3m 1s
    7. Opening and saving files
      4m 39s
  5. 14m 24s
    1. Creating basic objects: curves, surfaces, and solids
      4m 22s
    2. Performing basic transformations
      3m 14s
    3. Selecting objects
      3m 37s
    4. Organizing a project using layers
      3m 11s
  6. 21m 18s
    1. Understanding lines and polylines
      4m 10s
    2. Building rectangles and polygons
      5m 12s
    3. Creating arcs, circles, and ellipses
      7m 8s
    4. Drawing freeform curves
      4m 48s
  7. 47m 36s
    1. Comparing different types of 3D surfaces
      7m 11s
    2. Extruding surfaces to create features in a model
      8m 58s
    3. Creating surfaces with lofts
      7m 49s
    4. Using Revolve and Rail Revolve to create surfaces
      7m 42s
    5. Using Sweep Rail to create a 3D claw
      7m 49s
    6. Creating complex surface shapes using Network Surface
      8m 7s
  8. 46m 48s
    1. Introducing solids
      5m 42s
    2. Making solids with primitives
      5m 41s
    3. Extruding curves to create solids without primitives
      8m 59s
    4. Creating unique shapes with the union, difference, and intersection Boolean operators
      6m 46s
    5. Troubleshooting solids and Booleans
      8m 53s
    6. Editing with the solid edit tools
      6m 20s
    7. Creating and transforming holes in solids
      4m 27s
  9. 27m 8s
    1. Understanding Rhino's modeling aids
      3m 59s
    2. Working with the Grid Snap modeling aid
      2m 22s
    3. Using the Ortho modeling aid
      3m 4s
    4. Using the Planar modeling aid
      2m 4s
    5. Incorporating the Osnap modeling aid into your workflow
      6m 7s
    6. Understanding the Project and Smart Track modeling aids
      4m 42s
    7. Setting cursor constraints
      4m 50s
  10. 50m 14s
    1. Editing corners with Fillet and Chamfer
      7m 38s
    2. Trimming and splitting with curve Booleans
      5m 37s
    3. Moving and rotating objects with the Drag and Nudge tools
      7m 24s
    4. Copying and pasting objects
      4m 10s
    5. Understanding how Rhino uses Undo and Redo
      3m 42s
    6. Grouping objects
      3m 21s
    7. Scaling objects
      6m 40s
    8. Duplicating objects using the Mirror command
      6m 36s
    9. Making copies and structured sets using arrays
      5m 6s
  11. 20m 37s
    1. Using the Analysis toolbar to understand characteristics of a model
      6m 14s
    2. Defining degrees of curve and surfaces
      6m 6s
    3. Using Rebuild and Change Degree
      8m 17s
  12. 26m 21s
    1. Measuring and labeling values on a model using dimensioning
      5m 22s
    2. Creating screen captures for quick proofs
      5m 16s
    3. Creating 2D views of a 3D model
      6m 44s
    4. Rendering a project
      8m 59s
  13. 22m 5s
    1. Preparing a model for prototyping by confirming that all gaps are closed
      5m 17s
    2. Using the "shelling" technique to create wall thickness
      10m 54s
    3. Exporting to the STL format for 3D printing
      5m 54s
  14. 14s
    1. Goodbye
      14s

Start learning today

Get unlimited access to all courses for just $25/month.

Become a member
Sometimes @lynda teaches me how to use a program and sometimes Lynda.com changes my life forever. @JosefShutter
@lynda lynda.com is an absolute life saver when it comes to learning todays software. Definitely recommend it! #higherlearning @Michael_Caraway
@lynda The best thing online! Your database of courses is great! To the mark and very helpful. Thanks! @ru22more
Got to create something yesterday I never thought I could do. #thanks @lynda @Ngventurella
I really do love @lynda as a learning platform. Never stop learning and developing, it’s probably our greatest gift as a species! @soundslikedavid
@lynda just subscribed to lynda.com all I can say its brilliant join now trust me @ButchSamurai
@lynda is an awesome resource. The membership is priceless if you take advantage of it. @diabetic_techie
One of the best decision I made this year. Buy a 1yr subscription to @lynda @cybercaptive
guys lynda.com (@lynda) is the best. So far I’ve learned Java, principles of OO programming, and now learning about MS project @lucasmitchell
Signed back up to @lynda dot com. I’ve missed it!! Proper geeking out right now! #timetolearn #geek @JayGodbold

Are you sure you want to delete this note?

No

Thanks for signing up.

We’ll send you a confirmation email shortly.


Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

Keep up with news, tips, and latest courses with emails from lynda.com.

Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

   
submit Lightbox submit clicked
Terms and conditions of use

We've updated our terms and conditions (now called terms of service).Go
Review and accept our updated terms of service.