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Revit Architecture 2011 Essential Training

Understanding view range


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Revit Architecture 2011 Essential Training

with Paul F. Aubin

Video: Understanding view range

Orthographic views in Revit are generated from the 3D model using a variety of rules derived from conventional architectural drafting. When it comes to plan views, architectural drafting convention treats the plan as basically a horizontal section, cutting the building at a predetermined height above the floor, and then looking down into the model. Naturally, there are many other rules that are in abstractions that are applied to the graphics to achieve an acceptable floor plan. However, the concept of cut plane is used quite literally in Revit. In this movie, we will look not just at the cut plane, but the entire view range and understand how it functions and how we can manipulate it in floor plan views.
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  1. 1m 59s
    1. Welcome
      1m 27s
    2. Using the exercise files
      32s
  2. 13m 45s
    1. Introducing building information modeling (BIM)
      3m 0s
    2. Working in one model with many views
      5m 51s
    3. Understanding Revit element hierarchy
      4m 54s
  3. 47m 31s
    1. Using the Recent Files screen and the Application menu
      3m 21s
    2. Using the Ribbon and the Quick Access Toolbar (QAT)
      5m 3s
    3. Understanding context ribbons
      3m 0s
    4. Using the Project Browser and navigating views
      7m 37s
    5. Using the Properties palette
      10m 1s
    6. Selection and modification basics
      10m 27s
    7. Accessing Revit options
      8m 2s
  4. 42m 18s
    1. Creating a new project
      3m 26s
    2. Understanding the importance of template files
      5m 7s
    3. Understanding project settings
      6m 9s
    4. Opening and saving projects
      9m 9s
    5. Adding levels
      5m 0s
    6. Adding grids
      8m 41s
    7. Adding columns
      4m 46s
  5. 58m 21s
    1. Adding walls
      8m 39s
    2. Using snaps
      6m 39s
    3. Understanding wall properties and wall types
      7m 24s
    4. Locating walls
      7m 34s
    5. Using the modify tools
      7m 33s
    6. Adding doors and windows
      6m 37s
    7. Using constraints
      4m 47s
    8. Adding plumbing fixtures and other components
      4m 8s
    9. Using Autodesk Seek
      5m 0s
  6. 50m 52s
    1. Working with DWG files
      7m 51s
    2. Creating topography from a DWG link
      7m 45s
    3. Understanding CAD inserts
      6m 8s
    4. Using import tips
      4m 6s
    5. Creating a group
      9m 20s
    6. Working with Revit links
      9m 3s
    7. Managing links
      5m 51s
    8. Understanding file formats
      48s
  7. 1h 2m
    1. Working with floors
      8m 37s
    2. Working with footprint roofs
      7m 13s
    3. Working with extrusion roofs
      6m 0s
    4. Roof modifications and examples
      6m 27s
    5. Working with slope arrows
      6m 17s
    6. Adding openings
      8m 13s
    7. Working with stairs
      7m 41s
    8. Working with railings
      4m 29s
    9. Working with ceilings
      7m 36s
  8. 35m 52s
    1. Creating a custom basic wall type
      6m 10s
    2. Understanding stacked walls
      7m 31s
    3. Adding curtain walls
      6m 50s
    4. Adding curtain grids, mullions, and panels
      6m 44s
    5. Creating wall sweeps
      8m 37s
  9. 32m 43s
    1. Using object styles
      4m 45s
    2. Working with visibility/graphic overrides
      6m 52s
    3. Using Hide/Isolate
      7m 11s
    4. Understanding view range
      7m 40s
    5. Using the Linework tool
      4m 2s
    6. Using cutaway views
      2m 13s
  10. 21m 44s
    1. Adding rooms
      7m 4s
    2. Controlling room numbering
      8m 16s
    3. Understanding room bounding elements
      6m 24s
  11. 27m 2s
    1. Understanding tags
      7m 42s
    2. Adding schedules
      6m 50s
    3. Modifying schedules
      6m 8s
    4. Creating a key schedule
      6m 22s
  12. 48m 38s
    1. Adding text
      7m 21s
    2. Adding dimensions
      7m 26s
    3. Adding symbols
      3m 54s
    4. Adding legend views
      4m 42s
    5. Creating a detail callout
      6m 25s
    6. Using detail components
      9m 36s
    7. Adding filled and masking regions
      9m 14s
  13. 34m 39s
    1. Understanding families
      2m 37s
    2. Using reference planes, parameters, and constraints
      10m 46s
    3. Adding solid geometry
      8m 40s
    4. Adding void geometry
      4m 49s
    5. Completing the family
      7m 47s
  14. 32m 6s
    1. Adding sheets
      7m 58s
    2. Working with placeholder sheets
      4m 16s
    3. Outputting sheets to a DWF file
      6m 5s
    4. Exporting to AutoCAD
      5m 50s
    5. Plotting and creating a PDF
      7m 57s
  15. 25s
    1. Goodbye
      25s

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Revit Architecture 2011 Essential Training
8h 30m Beginner Jul 23, 2010

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

In Revit Architecture 2011 Essential Training, author Paul F. Aubin shows how to create compelling architectural designs using the modeling tools in Revit. This course covers the entire building information modeling (BIM) workflow, from design concept to publishing. It also covers navigating the Revit interface, modeling basic building features such as walls, doors and windows, working with sketch-based components such as roofs and stairs, annotating designs with dimensions and callouts, and adding 3D geometry. Exercise files are included with the course.

Topics include:
  • Introducing building information modeling (BIM)
  • Adding levels, grids, and columns to set up a project
  • Creating building layouts with walls, doors and windows
  • Modifying wall types and properties
  • Working with DWG files and CAD inserts
  • Adding rooms
  • Adding filled and masking regions and detailing
  • Generate schedules and reports
  • Understanding families
  • Using reference planes, parameters and constraints
  • Outputting files, including DWF and PDF files
Subjects:
Architecture BIM Previsualization CAD 3D Drawing
Software:
Revit Architecture
Author:
Paul F. Aubin

Understanding view range

Orthographic views in Revit are generated from the 3D model using a variety of rules derived from conventional architectural drafting. When it comes to plan views, architectural drafting convention treats the plan as basically a horizontal section, cutting the building at a predetermined height above the floor, and then looking down into the model. Naturally, there are many other rules that are in abstractions that are applied to the graphics to achieve an acceptable floor plan. However, the concept of cut plane is used quite literally in Revit. In this movie, we will look not just at the cut plane, but the entire view range and understand how it functions and how we can manipulate it in floor plan views.

What I have onscreen is a file called View Range and I am at the second floor right now, and what I would like to do is direct your attention to these windows right over here, and let's just talk about view range. Again, from architectural drafting, you should be pretty comfortable with the concept. Essentially, you're cutting through the building at a certain predetermined height and looking down, and that predetermined height in Revit is 4 feet, which matches up with my experience in architectural drafting school. Probably yours as well. So let's go ahead and take a look at this in Elevation.

So we can talk a little bit about what we want to do here, just to demonstrate the concept. So we were looking at these two windows in that second floor, and this is actually the roof level. That's why I wanted to back up and check. This is Level 2. And if you imagine cutting it 4 feet, you would be right about here. Let me go ahead and just draw a line there. And we can even take that line and make it exactly 4 feet, and so you can see that it cuts right through those windows.

Now, if I copied that line up to about here somewhere, let's just make that a nice even number, if we cut it 12 feet, we would actually be cutting through these clerestory windows that are up much higher in the wall. So let's take a quick look at how we can manipulate that setting and that should give you a pretty good idea of how the view range functions in a Revit floor plan. So let's go back to Level 2. This is what it looks like when we cut it 4 feet. Now, we've discussed this before, but I just want to reiterate, if nothing is selected in your model, then what you are seeing on the Properties palette is actually the properties of the current view.

So you can verify that over here, because it says Floor Plan: Level 2. If you have something selected, like this column, it will say Column and it will say that you have one column selected here. But you can always still get back to the properties of Floor Plan: Level 2 by clicking this dropdown. So either way, I mean, I don't need anything selected, but I just want you to always pay attention to what it says here. So make sure that it says Floor Plan: Level 2, because if it doesn't, when you scroll down, you won't find the View Range setting that we are looking for. So down here under Extents, we have View Range, and we are going to click this Edit button, and it will bring up this box.

And there is actually four settings and they define basically three zones in the view range. So let's start with the first two that are the easiest to discuss. Bottom is at the Associated Level, Level 2, and that's just 0. So it's 0 from Level 2, so it's right there at the floor. And then the cut plane is also relative to the Associative Level. We cannot change that. So that's grayed out. But we can change the offset, and it's defaulting to the 4 feet above the floor, as we just discussed. Furthermore, the view range does actually take into account geometry that occurs a little bit above the cut plane and even potentially a little bit below the bottom of the view range, and so that's what those last two settings are for.

We have got Top and we have got View Depth, and we'll discuss those in a few moment. So let's just focus our energy right now on the cut plane. In the Elevation view we drew a line at 12 feet, what I want to show you here is we can't get away with just typing 12 feet and clicking OK. We'll get an error message from Revit. So one last rule that you need to know, these numbers need to be in order. So that means it doesn't matter what you set this number to, but this number here at the top of the view range has to be at least equal to the cut plane or higher. So I am going to just go ahead and make it 12 feet as well. It doesn't matter.

It can be the same, but it can't be lower. So I am going to go ahead and click OK, and you'll see these windows got smaller. We are cutting through those two upper windows. Now, of course we kind of lost many of the other objects. We're no longer seeing any of the furniture and we are not seeing the doors, because we are no longer cutting through those. We are not seeing these windows over here. So we wouldn't want to keep the drawing set to this setting, but I just wanted to use it to illustrate for you how the view range works. So I am actually going to undo that back to the setting that we were at. So if your modification is moving within a few inches, you are probably okay.

You would probably get away with it, but if you're making a dramatic change, then you might want to take a slightly different approach. So let me take you down to the first floor and go take a look at the stairs, and we can discuss a similar situation right over here. Now, the stairs are also being cut at 4 feet, like everything else in the floor plan is, and that gives us this diagonal cut line right about here. Now, my preference would be for the diagonal cut line to actually occur after the landing.

Okay. I think that's a nicer graphic. If you don't agree, you can leave yours alone. But what I am going to do is I want to adjust just the stair and not change the rest of the floor plan, because to get it to go after the landing, I would need to increase the cut height to about 8 feet, maybe even 9 feet, and then we'll have the same problem we just witnessed on the second floor. The stair will cut really nicely, but then all the doors and windows will disappear, and the rest of the floor plan will not be what we want. So where is the compromise? We go to the View tab, and under Plan Views, we're going to choose this item here called the Plan Region.

This is a sketch-based object and you can sketch it any shape you want, and all I am going to do is just go to the Rectangle tool here and just kind of make it big enough to surround the stair. I want to just nudge it slightly. I am going to use the arrow key on the keyboard there to just nudge it slightly, so that it's just big enough to cover the stair and not any bigger. I am going to click Finish and you'll see this dashed green line appear.

Now, if I selected that dashed green line, this is a plan region, over here on the Modify Plan Region tab, you will see a View Range button, and if I click on that, it's the same settings we were just looking at for the whole floor plan, but now they only apply in this rectangle. So I am going to take this and go up to maybe 8' 6". I'll increase this to 9', so it's a little bit taller, click OK, and you'll see that the cut moves up a little higher. Now, it's actually a little higher than I'd like, so I'll probably go ahead and modify and drop it down a little bit less than that. Let's try 7.

That's a little nicer, and there you go, and that did not affect the doors or the furniture or anything else. Everything else is still displaying just fine and now we get the stairs looking the way we want. So we could do the same approach, if I went back to the second floor, to make those clerestory windows display if we needed those to display instead. Now, in this case, because I have lower windows, I am not going to do that, but I could just draw a simple little rectangle right there and increase the cut range just in that zone. Now, you will actually see that there is already one in here in this view, and I am going to click on it and do Edit View Range, just to show you the settings.

Here the cut range has been modified so that it goes up above that low roof, and that's what's allowing us to see the low roof here in our second floor plan. So you can use these settings in a variety of different ways to get the floor plans to display exactly the way you need them to display. Whether or not you edit the overall view range of the entire view or whether or not you add these plan regions to just isolate the change into certain areas, it works the same way in both cases.

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