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Phasing and Design Options in Revit
Illustration by Richard Downs
Watching:

Understanding phasing


From:

Phasing and Design Options in Revit

with Paul F. Aubin

Video: Understanding phasing

Phasing in Revit gives us the ability to apply the fourth dimension or time to our projects. Revit's approach to phasing is simple and straightforward. A simple timeline is established for your project that includes one or more points in time. Each point in time is a phase. The out-of-the-box default template includes just two phases, Existing and New Construction. You can add additional phases as the project needs to dictate. Now, even though you can have fewer than the two default phases, the two make sense because almost every project you're going to have what was here before or Existing and then what we're going to create, the New Construction.

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Phasing and Design Options in Revit
1h 54m Intermediate Feb 20, 2013

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

Phasing in Autodesk Revit allows you to show the complete life cycle of a project, such as a before and after or existing and proposed status, while design options allow you to save multiple iterations of a concept in a single project file. In this course, Paul F. Aubin shows how to use phasing and design options to organize multipart, multifaceted projects in Revit. The course also covers adding and assigning phases to views, scheduling phases and designating future work, working with design option sets, and presenting complex designs to clients.

Topics include:
  • What is phasing?
  • Phasing properties for objects
  • Using phase filters and graphic overrides
  • Phasing rooms
  • Looking at topography and phasing
  • Setting up design options
  • Strategizing design options
  • Working with phasing and design options together
Subjects:
Architecture BIM CAD
Software:
Revit Architecture
Author:
Paul F. Aubin

Understanding phasing

Phasing in Revit gives us the ability to apply the fourth dimension or time to our projects. Revit's approach to phasing is simple and straightforward. A simple timeline is established for your project that includes one or more points in time. Each point in time is a phase. The out-of-the-box default template includes just two phases, Existing and New Construction. You can add additional phases as the project needs to dictate. Now, even though you can have fewer than the two default phases, the two make sense because almost every project you're going to have what was here before or Existing and then what we're going to create, the New Construction.

And so the way this works is the first thing you want to do is you want to establish what those phases are. So each phase is going to represent some key point in time for your project. Now in a more complex project you might need more than the two default phases. You might need a phase 1 construction, phase 2 staging, caissons, whatever the case may be, but you establish each of those phases, and you do so in the Phasing dialog. So I'll click on the Manage tab and over here we'll see a Phasing button and when we click that that brings up the Phasing dialog, and as you can see, we've got the two existing phases, Existing and New Construction, and we could add more over here.

So the next step is assigning the geometry to the various phases. So what you do is you select your elements, and on the Properties palette each element has actually two phase settings, they have a Phase Created and a Phase Demolished. Now the way this works is what you're essentially doing is establishing the lifespan of the object. The object gets created at some point in time, some phase, and then potentially gets demolished at some other point in time, and that's the Phase Demolished. A misconception that new users often make in Revit is creating a demolition phase.

A demolition phase is not necessary because demolition can occur at any phase. So when you select an object in Revit, and you look at its Properties, you see that you tell it what Phase it's created and what phase it's demolished. If it's not demolished, if it's going to stay then you just leave it set to None. Compare that to say this object over here where we can see that it was created in existing, but it gets demolished in New Construction and therefore Revit displays it with the dashed line. So the next thing we typically want to do is determine actually which phase the view that we're in shows.

So in other words, the floor plan or the section or the elevation that you're working with in Revit can show a particular point in time, and not every view has to show the same point in time. Now each view has also two phase parameters, but they are slightly different than the objects. They have the phase which determines what the active phase of that view is, and they have something called a Phase Filter which actually allows us to customize the way the phases ought to display in that view. So in some cases we can filter out certain phases and not display them at all. In other cases we can change graphically the way objects belonging to that phase can be displayed, and so on.

So in this fairly simple example, I'm in a Floor Plan view, and you want to make sure that nothing is selected, and over here on the Properties palette it says Floor Plan, and when you scroll down you see that the current phase for this view is New Construction. The Phase Filter is set to Show Everything. But if I change New Construction to Existing, what you're going to see is the two objects on the right disappear because they were both created in New Construction. At this point in time that hasn't happened yet, because we told the view to show us what the project looks like during the Existing phase.

So it slightly went back in time, and so those are the two objects haven't happened yet. As an additional consequence, the two objects we're looking at now look like New Construction, they've become bold because at this point in time they were new. So that's the essential overview of how Phasing works in Revit. You need to establish what the key points in time are in your Phasing dialog, you need to assign those Phases to each of your objects and potentially say when those objects are not only created but also demolished, and then finally use the Phase Settings on the views to determine what you see at any given point in time.

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