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Phasing levels and grids

From: Phasing and Design Options in Revit

Video: Phasing levels and grids

The Phase Created and Phase Demolish parameters on the Properties palette apply to model elements only. Now for most elements in your model, this won't be a problem, but a few elements that we use quite frequently are not actually model elements. Two such elements are Levels and Grids. Now most projects have levels and most projects have grids. And in some cases, you're going to introduce new levels and new grids at certain points in time. For example, you might have a building that's only two stories in existing construction, and you are going to add a third or fourth story in the new construction.

Phasing levels and grids

The Phase Created and Phase Demolish parameters on the Properties palette apply to model elements only. Now for most elements in your model, this won't be a problem, but a few elements that we use quite frequently are not actually model elements. Two such elements are Levels and Grids. Now most projects have levels and most projects have grids. And in some cases, you're going to introduce new levels and new grids at certain points in time. For example, you might have a building that's only two stories in existing construction, and you are going to add a third or fourth story in the new construction.

How would you add those levels in phasing? Or you might add an addition to a building and therefore need a bunch of new gridlines for the columns in that new edition that don't want to show in the earlier phases. So in both cases, we can't rely on phasing to do this for us automatically, so we're going to have to manage that a little bit more manually. So I'm in a file here called Levels and Grids, and over here on the right-hand side in the addition I have gridlines 1, 2, and A and B. Now those grids only need to be there in views that show the addition.

So if I go back to Level 1 (Existing), you'll notice that we're only seeing the building on the left, and we clearly would not want to see the Grids that are appearing there on the right. Now there's a couple ways we can do that. Unfortunately, we can't just select the grid and assign a phase to it. That feature is not available in Revit. So how do we work around that problem? Well, there's a simple solution, and then there is a more complex solution, so let's start with the simple solution. The simple solution is to simply select all of the levels or grids in question, in this case I'm selecting the four grids, and then go up to your Hide in View command here, the small little light bulb on the Modify tab and choose Hide Elements.

Now I'm going to choose Hide Elements rather than Hide Category because there may be some grids that are part of the existing building that I do want to display. So Hide Elements limits the hide to just the elements that I have selected and not anything else and they're only hidden in this current view, so if I go back to the Level 1, Phase 1 view, the Grids are still displaying here. Now that's certainly works, but let's look at a slightly more advanced alternative so I'm going to undo here to get those grid line back again.

Now this technique is definitely a little bit more advanced and requires some setup. But if you're working on a very large project, it might be worth the effort to do this. So the first step is to introduce a Scope Box, so I'm going to go to the View tab and click the Scope Box tool, and I'll draw it roughly the size of the existing grids. Now typically we introduce the Scope Box into our project when we want to change the extent of all of our datum elements like our grid and levels to the same size throughout the project, and we can certainly do that here.

But what I'm actually going to do is use this Scope Box as a way to filter the display of these levels. So the first thing I want to do is give it a nice descriptive name. So I'm going to call this Grids Phase 1. Now I'm then going to select the four Grids and here on the Scope Box feature on properties, I'm going to assign them to Grids Phase 1. Now when I apply that they are going to adjust slightly because again that's the function of the Scope Box, so I can fine tune if I didn't want them to resize, and I can certainly fine tune the size of that.

So now all of these grids are assigned to that Scope Box, but they are still displaying here in the Level 1 (Existing) view and in fact in all of the views. So the next step is I want to create a view filter that instructs Revit not to display elements that belong to the Scope Box in certain views. So we'll go to the View tab and over here on the Graphics panel, I'm going to click the Filters button. I'm going to click the New icon down here, I'll call this the same name right here and then you have to tell it in the Category area what kind of objects this filter should apply to, so I'll scroll down here, and I'll check the Grid's box.

So this filter that I've just created will apply to grids. Over here, you need to give it a Rule, so you can have up to 3 rules, what is it looking for specifically, now our Filter is just like a filter in any database program, it's going to look at your over all project and look for some criteria that all the objects have in common. In this case, I'm going to say the criteria that I'm searching for is the Scope Box setting. So there is Scope Box right there, and I want my Scope Box setting to equal Grids Phase 1.

Now you have other choices here does not equal, but in this case Grids Phase 1 is what I want. So I've got that selected, click OK, that's my filter, And the final step now is to apply that filter to the visibility graphics of any of the views that don't want to see these Grids. So I'm going to do VG, which is the shortcut for Visibility Graphics, go over here to the Filters tab, add a filter, there's my Grids Phase 1, and it adds that line item. So now the filter is here, and it's just using the Default Visibility, so all I have to do is uncheck it, click OK, and you're going to see those grids disappear.

Now if you don't want to see the Scope Box, you can do one additional step, or you can select the Scope Box and over here on the Views Visible setting on the Properties palette, you can click Edit, and you can hide that in certain views, so I can come down to the Floor Plan for Existing Level 1 and tell it to be invisible. That's going to hide the Scope Box itself, not the contents of the Scope Box. But now when I go back to Level 1 Phase 1, you can see that both the Scope Box and the Grids are still displaying here, because first of all the Views Visible setting here was not overridden.

That's why the green Scope Box-Scope Box is still showing, and the grids themselves, if we go to Visibility Graphics, we don't have the Filter applied to this view. So when you set up a Filter, you choose which views it gets applied to. So admittedly, that's a little bit more complex solution, and in a simple project like this, probably not warranted. But in a large hospital or some other very complex project, you might find that a more useful way to manage your Grids and Levels and control the visibility across the phases that don't want to see them.

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Phasing and Design Options in Revit

25 video lessons · 3387 viewers

Paul F. Aubin
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