Start learning with our library of video tutorials taught by experts. Get started

Documentary Editing with Premiere Pro
Illustration by John Hersey

Choosing an interview logging method


From:

Documentary Editing with Premiere Pro

with Jason Osder

Video: Choosing an interview logging method

We've already taken a brief tour of our interviews. But now it's time to actually digest and annotate the interview content for the purpose of editing. But how are we going to do that? Let's pause to consider, because some strategic thinking at this point will go a long way to a smooth process. There are a lot of ways to go about logging, but for me the goal is always the same. As the editor, you need to become very familiar with the footage, and you need to be able to fine shots and bites quickly when it's time to edit. So there's a lots of ways to do this, but the goal is really always the same.
Expand all | Collapse all
  1. 5m 7s
    1. Welcome
      51s
    2. Using the exercise files
      1m 35s
    3. Interpreting a creative brief to establish goals
      1m 29s
    4. How to use this course
      1m 12s
  2. 12m 49s
    1. Identifying messaging concepts
      1m 58s
    2. Tips for working with interviews
      4m 53s
    3. Tips on B-roll sequences
      2m 58s
    4. Researching background and history
      3m 0s
  3. 37m 38s
    1. Organizing the ingest process
      3m 43s
    2. Choosing an interview logging method
      2m 40s
    3. Adding interview metadata
      4m 56s
    4. Logging interviews with markers
      6m 18s
    5. Adding notes to B-roll clips
      5m 36s
    6. Preparing archival images with Photoshop
      9m 20s
    7. Pulling selects and presenting ideas
      5m 5s
  4. 51m 20s
    1. Structuring the edit
      3m 0s
    2. Assembling B-roll shots
      8m 52s
    3. Assembling interviews
      6m 56s
    4. Building sequences and scenes
      7m 53s
    5. Editing interview bites on the Timeline
      6m 16s
    6. Adding other media types to the Timeline
      6m 5s
    7. Completing the rough cut
      10m 1s
    8. Presenting the rough cut and receiving feedback
      2m 17s
  5. 31m 6s
    1. Planning moves on photographs
      6m 23s
    2. Animating images
      9m 17s
    3. Creating a title graphic in Photoshop
      6m 8s
    4. Animating a title graphic in Premiere
      6m 40s
    5. Presenting graphics work
      2m 38s
  6. 55m 28s
    1. Performing an editorial evaluation
      4m 41s
    2. Refining scene order
      2m 53s
    3. Adjusting interview content
      7m 57s
    4. Adjusting B-roll shots
      6m 29s
    5. Tightening clip timing
      6m 21s
    6. Fine-cutting audio
      9m 22s
    7. Reviewing all assets
      6m 18s
    8. Adding end credits
      5m 12s
    9. Locking the picture and preparing the Timeline for finishing
      3m 37s
    10. Presenting the picture lock to the client and receiving approval
      2m 38s
  7. 34m 8s
    1. Evaluating the piece for finishing goals
      7m 11s
    2. Polishing the final audio mix
      7m 49s
    3. Correcting color for consistency
      9m 49s
    4. Adjusting the title and animations for the best compression
      5m 56s
    5. Exporting multiple files
      3m 23s
  8. 50s
    1. Next steps
      50s

Watch this entire course now—plus get access to every course in the library. Each course includes high-quality videos taught by expert instructors.

Become a member
please wait ...
Documentary Editing with Premiere Pro
3h 48m Intermediate Sep 19, 2012

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

Find out how to highlight a cause, express a point of view, and tell a story with Adobe Premiere Pro and some essential documentary editing techniques. This course breaks down the documentary process into a series of stages that correspond to the milestones of a real client project. Starting with existing footage, you'll discover how to identify the key messaging concepts and log the footage. Then find out how to assemble rough and fine-tuned cuts, and layer in motion graphics and a credit roll. The final phase explores color correction and audio mixing, before exporting your final movie.

This course is part of a series that looks at Documentary Editing from the point of view of 3 different editors in 3 different editing applications.  For more insight on editing documentary projects, take a look at Documentary Editing with Avid Media Composer and Documentary Editing with Final Cut Pro X.

Topics include:
  • Interpreting a creative brief
  • Logging interviews and other footage
  • Pulling selects and presenting ideas
  • Building sequences and scenes
  • Creating title graphics
  • Animating images
  • Adjusting b-roll shots
  • Tightening clip timing
  • Compressing and exporting multiple files
Subjects:
Video Video Editing Projects
Software:
Premiere Pro
Author:
Jason Osder

Choosing an interview logging method

We've already taken a brief tour of our interviews. But now it's time to actually digest and annotate the interview content for the purpose of editing. But how are we going to do that? Let's pause to consider, because some strategic thinking at this point will go a long way to a smooth process. There are a lot of ways to go about logging, but for me the goal is always the same. As the editor, you need to become very familiar with the footage, and you need to be able to fine shots and bites quickly when it's time to edit. So there's a lots of ways to do this, but the goal is really always the same.

There's different ways to do this, because there's different types of editors, and because there's different types of projects. Even though you may like one method, a different method might be better for a different project. I find that longer projects require me to do more off-line work outside the interface more notes, more transcribing. Where shorter projects, I often get by right in the interface with things like markers. Traditionally, all of the content for a documentary was fully transcribed, meaning, all of the interview question and answers were written out and descriptions were written for all the observational material.

Many editors insist that this is the best and only way to keep track of your material. Interestingly, I was recently at a panel on an editing master class, and I was surprised that many of these master editors no longer like working with transcripts. They feel that it's not as useful to see the words and they really need to see the footage. So there's definitely pro and con on both sides of the transcribing argument, and now Adobe Premiere Pro can do automated transcripts as well. That's not going to be the same as a human transcript, and it's not going to work on largely observational footage, but it does give you one more option.

So transcripts are something to consider, but not a must have. At the end of the day, it's going to be important to do what's right for your project. As I said this largely depends on how long your project is how much footage and things like that. I find when there is more that I can sort of hold in my mind, I write down less, but in a larger project, more writing is necessary. At the end of the day this time is really important. I find in my own project that as much as the notes I make are important just the time spent with the footage is important.

As often as I go back to my notes, there's just something that I remember, but I remember it from the careful logging at this stage. So I've said it before, and I'll say it again, there is many ways to do this part of the process. The important thing is to pause for a moment, consider your project and pick a methodology that's really going to work, that will pay off later.

There are currently no FAQs about Documentary Editing with Premiere Pro.

 
Share a link to this course

What are exercise files?

Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course. Save time by downloading the author's files instead of setting up your own files, and learn by following along with the instructor.

Can I take this course without the exercise files?

Yes! If you decide you would like the exercise files later, you can upgrade to a premium account any time.

Become a member Download sample files See plans and pricing

Please wait... please wait ...
Upgrade to get access to exercise files.

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Learn by watching, listening, and doing, Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along Premium memberships include access to all exercise files in the library.
Upgrade now


Exercise files

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

For additional information on downloading and using exercise files, watch our instructional video or read the instructions in the FAQ.

This course includes free exercise files, so you can practice while you watch the course. To access all the exercise files in our library, become a Premium Member.

join now Upgrade now

Are you sure you want to mark all the videos in this course as unwatched?

This will not affect your course history, your reports, or your certificates of completion for this course.


Mark all as unwatched Cancel

Congratulations

You have completed Documentary Editing with Premiere Pro.

Return to your organization's learning portal to continue training, or close this page.


OK
Become a member to add this course to a playlist

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses—and create as many playlists as you like.

Get started

Already a member?

Become a member to like this course.

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses.

Get started

Already a member?

Exercise files

Learn by watching, listening, and doing! Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along. Exercise files are available with all Premium memberships. Learn more

Get started

Already a Premium member?

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Ask a question

Thanks for contacting us.
You’ll hear from our Customer Service team within 24 hours.

Please enter the text shown below:

The classic layout automatically defaults to the latest Flash Player.

To choose a different player, hold the cursor over your name at the top right of any lynda.com page and choose Site preferencesfrom the dropdown menu.

Continue to classic layout Stay on new layout
Exercise files

Access exercise files from a button right under the course name.

Mark videos as unwatched

Remove icons showing you already watched videos if you want to start over.

Control your viewing experience

Make the video wide, narrow, full-screen, or pop the player out of the page into its own window.

Interactive transcripts

Click on text in the transcript to jump to that spot in the video. As the video plays, the relevant spot in the transcript will be highlighted.

Are you sure you want to delete this note?

No

Notes cannot be added for locked videos.

Thanks for signing up.

We’ll send you a confirmation email shortly.


Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

Keep up with news, tips, and latest courses with emails from lynda.com.

Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

   
submit Lightbox submit clicked
Terms and conditions of use

We've updated our terms and conditions (now called terms of service).Go
Review and accept our updated terms of service.