Easy-to-follow video tutorials help you learn software, creative, and business skills.Become a member

Assembling B-roll shots

From: Documentary Editing with Premiere Pro

Video: Assembling B-roll shots

In every edit there's a point where we turn that corner, and we stop just looking at things and making notes and start to actually edit on the timeline, and we've reached that point in this project. There's lots of ways to do this, but what's notable here is I'm going to start by assembling my visuals. Some editors like to lay down their interview bites first and they call that a radio edit, in other words, what we'll hear, gets laid down first, and then we put the visuals over it. I tried to fight that temptation, I try to speak with my visuals first and then put in some of the bites.

Assembling B-roll shots

In every edit there's a point where we turn that corner, and we stop just looking at things and making notes and start to actually edit on the timeline, and we've reached that point in this project. There's lots of ways to do this, but what's notable here is I'm going to start by assembling my visuals. Some editors like to lay down their interview bites first and they call that a radio edit, in other words, what we'll hear, gets laid down first, and then we put the visuals over it. I tried to fight that temptation, I try to speak with my visuals first and then put in some of the bites.

You may say it's an academic distinction, but I believe that by focusing on the visuals first in the process, we've a better shot of telling a more visual story. So that's exactly where I want to begin. You can see we're still set up in our Metalogging mode, and I want to change our Workspace layout for something better for these next steps. And in particular I plan to use some storyboard editing here, so I want to get setup, so I can do that. Let's start by changing our Workspace, and I'm going to start with the CS5.5 Workspace, but I'm going to actually adapt it from there.

So now we have a familiar editing layout, but what I really want is a much bigger project pane, so I can look at that as thumbnails and really it's the B-roll thumbnails that I need. So we'll just make that, take up that same real estate for us. Once I get my timeline ready we might get a little bit more space out of this. So I want a nice big timeline, and in fact, the media browser is going to be more or less irrelevant for this stage. So we'll setup something like that and then, I think I can get away with a little more real estate, let's see, yeah, something like that.

So now I can really see a lot of thumbnails across there. So down in the timeline I want to start real organized in terms of how we edit with our tracks, and in particular I want to edit my B-roll down onto Video 2 when it first comes down, and likewise, we'll get that natural sound down onto Audio 2. We're going to wind up putting our interviews on Video 1 and Audio 1. In Premiere, you can actually name these if you like to.

So I might go ahead and call that B-roll, and that's, that should be good. We want to just arrange these so that we can see them, and we do want to make sure that's active. Great. Now what we can do is some storyboard editing, which isn't always my favorite way to work, but because of some of the reasons I said, focusing on the visuals, and because our goals are really only a quick assembly of shots on the timeline, I think this is going to be really fast and efficient.

We've already decided and talked about a really good opening shot we have, so let's just go ahead and find that. There it is and what I'm going to do is just do some quick in and outs right in storyboard mode. I can see where that pan that like starts. So I'm going to mark it out first using the O key and then an in point using the I key, and this is just like marking in and out in the source viewer, only we're doing it in storyboard mode. And just like that I'm going to start building a very simple timeline, so I've got my opening, I want some of those on the farm shots that we talked about.

And I see one right there, so we've got some in and out. Now, again, I'm not being terribly careful, maybe I'd like to have not 3 minutes like I've got here, not like a shots really going be five to ten seconds, but somewhere in between. So just a nice even distribution of these, and I'll probably need one more shot for that "on the farm scene." I want to save some of these for picking and packing, so some generic shot and hopefully something with BD in it. I want to see what's going on with this.

Yeah, that's a nice establishing shot I think. It's a little bit hard to tell in storyboard mode which part I'll want. So again, I'm not going to be too careful here. I think that part is going to work in, notice when I push Play, it actually plays up top here, but I'm not opening in the source monitor, which saves me some time. So we'll mark a quick out, and we need in and out, and again, timing and actual content are going to be adjusted here, so I'm not even really looking at it.

I might twirl these down, so at least, yeah, I'd like to see the thumbnails there. So that's a very quick representation of the very beginning. I caught one other thing with my eye that I like, but I don't think I'm going to use it at the beginning. I think I'm going to save it to the end, it's this very nice close-up. Let's see if we can find it. If we scrub through this, I see some nice rack focusing and somewhere around there-- working in and in out for adjustment later--but I'm actually not going to put this in my first scene.

I'm going to put it at what I think it's going to be the end. So somewhere in the three to four minute range, because at the moment, I don't know if I'm going to use this at the beginning and the end, and I know that I need something for the end, so just as a placeholder, I'm going to put this down at the end. So I've got my opening little visuals, and I've got something in place for the end, I just want to start building the next scene, and then we'll skip ahead to see how this looks when we're done. That next scene is the "pick and pack" scene and it gets easier as you go, because you notice, and you know where your stuff is.

So I know I'm going to want some of these shots, looks like I've got a medium of BD and then these nice close-ups of BD. I'm probably going to need some each of that. There's some things way too long on the timeline just trim it up for now without worrying about it, and if you need something in our two shots from the same clip, that's also no problem.

So I'm not even really editing these for content yet, I just want a nice even distribution. It's sort of like laying the paint on the palette here. These shots are also going to be really nice, the wides and the tights, I am just going to tighten there for now, and we just proceed to build. There's one shot I've already noticed that I know goes in this scene, and I want to point it out, because it's a little special. It's right here.

You see the way the truck leaves, that's a really nice transitional shot, and I know that after we pick and pack, we need to go to the market. And as I said, I love to speak with my visuals, so if I can get this marked right where it pulls out, in and out, this is the process, and I just want to show you how this timeline looks when it's all finished. Here you see how our timeline looks with our major scenes assembled just as their rough visuals.

We've done our farm introduction scene, and I'm just looking at the thumbnails for now. I'm not even playing, the timings are so off, that I'm not even playing, this timeline, with the big black holes and the rough edits, I just want to see my ingredients on the timeline here. So I've got my little opening section, I've got my pick and pack section. I'm leaving a hole here, we haven't put the historical photographs in, but I know they're going to go right around there before we go to market. Here I've got the actual market scene, the Downey's Tour Kitchen, and then at the very end I've put a little placeholder in for my last shot.

If I look at the whole timeline, it's also ending just short of three minutes, that's probably going to drift around a little bit, but I've accomplished my goals. I've gone from only organization in the Project pane, to some of my visuals coming down onto the timeline in an organized way. And I've based this on the guideline or roadmap that I made in the last step when I organized and planned my edit. So, one step at a time, very methodical, and in this case, focusing on the visuals before we even worry about the words.

I like that in particular, and when I sort of look at this all assembled, I know that I'm starting to see a visual story here, and that's really important to my process.

Show transcript

This video is part of

Image for Documentary Editing with Premiere Pro
Documentary Editing with Premiere Pro

44 video lessons · 11128 viewers

Jason Osder
Author

 
Expand all | Collapse all
  1. 5m 7s
    1. Welcome
      51s
    2. Using the exercise files
      1m 35s
    3. Interpreting a creative brief to establish goals
      1m 29s
    4. How to use this course
      1m 12s
  2. 12m 49s
    1. Identifying messaging concepts
      1m 58s
    2. Tips for working with interviews
      4m 53s
    3. Tips on B-roll sequences
      2m 58s
    4. Researching background and history
      3m 0s
  3. 37m 38s
    1. Organizing the ingest process
      3m 43s
    2. Choosing an interview logging method
      2m 40s
    3. Adding interview metadata
      4m 56s
    4. Logging interviews with markers
      6m 18s
    5. Adding notes to B-roll clips
      5m 36s
    6. Preparing archival images with Photoshop
      9m 20s
    7. Pulling selects and presenting ideas
      5m 5s
  4. 51m 20s
    1. Structuring the edit
      3m 0s
    2. Assembling B-roll shots
      8m 52s
    3. Assembling interviews
      6m 56s
    4. Building sequences and scenes
      7m 53s
    5. Editing interview bites on the Timeline
      6m 16s
    6. Adding other media types to the Timeline
      6m 5s
    7. Completing the rough cut
      10m 1s
    8. Presenting the rough cut and receiving feedback
      2m 17s
  5. 31m 6s
    1. Planning moves on photographs
      6m 23s
    2. Animating images
      9m 17s
    3. Creating a title graphic in Photoshop
      6m 8s
    4. Animating a title graphic in Premiere
      6m 40s
    5. Presenting graphics work
      2m 38s
  6. 55m 28s
    1. Performing an editorial evaluation
      4m 41s
    2. Refining scene order
      2m 53s
    3. Adjusting interview content
      7m 57s
    4. Adjusting B-roll shots
      6m 29s
    5. Tightening clip timing
      6m 21s
    6. Fine-cutting audio
      9m 22s
    7. Reviewing all assets
      6m 18s
    8. Adding end credits
      5m 12s
    9. Locking the picture and preparing the Timeline for finishing
      3m 37s
    10. Presenting the picture lock to the client and receiving approval
      2m 38s
  7. 34m 8s
    1. Evaluating the piece for finishing goals
      7m 11s
    2. Polishing the final audio mix
      7m 49s
    3. Correcting color for consistency
      9m 49s
    4. Adjusting the title and animations for the best compression
      5m 56s
    5. Exporting multiple files
      3m 23s
  8. 50s
    1. Next steps
      50s

Start learning today

Get unlimited access to all courses for just $25/month.

Become a member
Sometimes @lynda teaches me how to use a program and sometimes Lynda.com changes my life forever. @JosefShutter
@lynda lynda.com is an absolute life saver when it comes to learning todays software. Definitely recommend it! #higherlearning @Michael_Caraway
@lynda The best thing online! Your database of courses is great! To the mark and very helpful. Thanks! @ru22more
Got to create something yesterday I never thought I could do. #thanks @lynda @Ngventurella
I really do love @lynda as a learning platform. Never stop learning and developing, it’s probably our greatest gift as a species! @soundslikedavid
@lynda just subscribed to lynda.com all I can say its brilliant join now trust me @ButchSamurai
@lynda is an awesome resource. The membership is priceless if you take advantage of it. @diabetic_techie
One of the best decision I made this year. Buy a 1yr subscription to @lynda @cybercaptive
guys lynda.com (@lynda) is the best. So far I’ve learned Java, principles of OO programming, and now learning about MS project @lucasmitchell
Signed back up to @lynda dot com. I’ve missed it!! Proper geeking out right now! #timetolearn #geek @JayGodbold
Share a link to this course

What are exercise files?

Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course. Save time by downloading the author's files instead of setting up your own files, and learn by following along with the instructor.

Can I take this course without the exercise files?

Yes! If you decide you would like the exercise files later, you can upgrade to a premium account any time.

Become a member Download sample files See plans and pricing

Please wait... please wait ...
Upgrade to get access to exercise files.

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Learn by watching, listening, and doing, Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along Premium memberships include access to all exercise files in the library.


Exercise files

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

For additional information on downloading and using exercise files, watch our instructional video or read the instructions in the FAQ.

This course includes free exercise files, so you can practice while you watch the course. To access all the exercise files in our library, become a Premium Member.

Are you sure you want to mark all the videos in this course as unwatched?

This will not affect your course history, your reports, or your certificates of completion for this course.


Mark all as unwatched Cancel

Congratulations

You have completed Documentary Editing with Premiere Pro.

Return to your organization's learning portal to continue training, or close this page.


OK
Become a member to add this course to a playlist

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses—and create as many playlists as you like.

Get started

Already a member?

Become a member to like this course.

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses.

Get started

Already a member?

Exercise files

Learn by watching, listening, and doing! Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along. Exercise files are available with all Premium memberships. Learn more

Get started

Already a Premium member?

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Ask a question

Thanks for contacting us.
You’ll hear from our Customer Service team within 24 hours.

Please enter the text shown below:

The classic layout automatically defaults to the latest Flash Player.

To choose a different player, hold the cursor over your name at the top right of any lynda.com page and choose Site preferencesfrom the dropdown menu.

Continue to classic layout Stay on new layout
Exercise files

Access exercise files from a button right under the course name.

Mark videos as unwatched

Remove icons showing you already watched videos if you want to start over.

Control your viewing experience

Make the video wide, narrow, full-screen, or pop the player out of the page into its own window.

Interactive transcripts

Click on text in the transcript to jump to that spot in the video. As the video plays, the relevant spot in the transcript will be highlighted.

Are you sure you want to delete this note?

No

Your file was successfully uploaded.

Thanks for signing up.

We’ll send you a confirmation email shortly.


Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

Keep up with news, tips, and latest courses with emails from lynda.com.

Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

   
submit Lightbox submit clicked
Terms and conditions of use

We've updated our terms and conditions (now called terms of service).Go
Review and accept our updated terms of service.