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Adding interview metadata

From: Documentary Editing with Premiere Pro

Video: Adding interview metadata

In Adobe Premiere Pro a lot of the actual logging--that is adding annotations to our clips--happens right inside the Project Panel. And that may be new if you're coming from a different nonlinear editor used to adding metadata as you bring in footage from a tape. But in Adobe Premiere Pro, it's very normal just to be editing your metadata columns in the Project Panel, which is what we're going to do now. I've already rearranged these columns to be using the ones that are most important to me in particular Log Note and Description.

Adding interview metadata

In Adobe Premiere Pro a lot of the actual logging--that is adding annotations to our clips--happens right inside the Project Panel. And that may be new if you're coming from a different nonlinear editor used to adding metadata as you bring in footage from a tape. But in Adobe Premiere Pro, it's very normal just to be editing your metadata columns in the Project Panel, which is what we're going to do now. I've already rearranged these columns to be using the ones that are most important to me in particular Log Note and Description.

I'm going to click on the Media Duration column head to order this by duration. I want to see the longest of my interviews rise to the top as they are now. See a 31 minute interview and then an eight minute interview and then some of my shorter ones. That's naturally going to put these in an order where I'm dealing with the things that are probably most important to the project first, and that's very much what I want. Now I'm going to use the Log Note column, and I want to use it to just capture any of the important logistical information.

Mostly people's names, maybe where they work, the types of things that would go in a lower third. A little later I'm going to edit the actual clip names and so I might lose some of that information at that point. I want to make sure I have it here in Log Note. So starting with this first interview we can see that it's BD the farmer, it's long, and I already know from a quick glance that this is going to be an important interview. Moving down I have John Downey who is the chef, it's also going to be featured.

And then I get into some of these shorter ones, and I may go in and listen to a bit of the interview to get the information out, but I'm also not that concerned if I don't have absolutely full information. So in the case of Jonathan I don't actually have his last name, but I'm not terribly worried about it. In the case of Owen I have his first name and where he works but I don't have his last name, so again I am not going to stress about it just going to write down what I have.

It could be even later on a producer is placing some phone calls to get the exact name of someone but frankly we don't even know if these clips are going to make the cut or not. So for now let's just make sure that the information we have stays in our project. Okay, so that column now captures all of that important information, and that means that I can move over into the actual clip names, and without worrying about it I actually change these clip names to be whatever is going be most meaningful for me in the edit process.

So that's how I like to see it. This detailed information, last name, and where he is from, let's sort of demote that over to the right and during the editing process that's what I need to know. It's BD, this is his full interview. This is the chef, John Downey, and this is also his full interview. Jonathan is a market vendor, and that's probably what I need to know more than his name when I'm actually editing. Justin is a chef visiting the market, Owen is also a chef visiting the market.

So we'll just call him Chef 2 for our purposes in this column, and last Sarah is a Market Patron. Okay, now I sort of have my quick-draw clip names here, and I've got my longer log notes with the information. The last thing I want to do at this stage is use the Description column but I'm going to use it in a very specific way. I basically have two types of interviews here, a traditional sit-down, like BD, and John Downey is also done in the traditional sit-down interview. But if you take a look at the Market Vendor and some of these others they're just shot standing up at the market, and I usually refer to that as a run & gun interview.

You might have a term you like better, it's also called a vox-pop interview, which stands for voice of the people that kind of stand up, give me your thoughts for a second. And couple of different names for those but they're really different than the sit-down interview, and that's what I want to know at a glance. In the sit-down interview it's going to be very good to use for things like voiceover but in a run & gun interview it's very hard to cutaway from that interview, you really have to see the person and their surroundings. So I've added metadata to these three columns.

We've got clip names that are informative and Description about what type of interview it is and then our Log Note that's going to be particularly handy when we go back to do our lower-third identifications. We're just moving one step at a time here and slow but steady progress is definitely a good way to proceed in the early parts of your project.

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This video is part of

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Documentary Editing with Premiere Pro

44 video lessons · 10920 viewers

Jason Osder
Author

 
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  1. 5m 7s
    1. Welcome
      51s
    2. Using the exercise files
      1m 35s
    3. Interpreting a creative brief to establish goals
      1m 29s
    4. How to use this course
      1m 12s
  2. 12m 49s
    1. Identifying messaging concepts
      1m 58s
    2. Tips for working with interviews
      4m 53s
    3. Tips on B-roll sequences
      2m 58s
    4. Researching background and history
      3m 0s
  3. 37m 38s
    1. Organizing the ingest process
      3m 43s
    2. Choosing an interview logging method
      2m 40s
    3. Adding interview metadata
      4m 56s
    4. Logging interviews with markers
      6m 18s
    5. Adding notes to B-roll clips
      5m 36s
    6. Preparing archival images with Photoshop
      9m 20s
    7. Pulling selects and presenting ideas
      5m 5s
  4. 51m 20s
    1. Structuring the edit
      3m 0s
    2. Assembling B-roll shots
      8m 52s
    3. Assembling interviews
      6m 56s
    4. Building sequences and scenes
      7m 53s
    5. Editing interview bites on the Timeline
      6m 16s
    6. Adding other media types to the Timeline
      6m 5s
    7. Completing the rough cut
      10m 1s
    8. Presenting the rough cut and receiving feedback
      2m 17s
  5. 31m 6s
    1. Planning moves on photographs
      6m 23s
    2. Animating images
      9m 17s
    3. Creating a title graphic in Photoshop
      6m 8s
    4. Animating a title graphic in Premiere
      6m 40s
    5. Presenting graphics work
      2m 38s
  6. 55m 28s
    1. Performing an editorial evaluation
      4m 41s
    2. Refining scene order
      2m 53s
    3. Adjusting interview content
      7m 57s
    4. Adjusting B-roll shots
      6m 29s
    5. Tightening clip timing
      6m 21s
    6. Fine-cutting audio
      9m 22s
    7. Reviewing all assets
      6m 18s
    8. Adding end credits
      5m 12s
    9. Locking the picture and preparing the Timeline for finishing
      3m 37s
    10. Presenting the picture lock to the client and receiving approval
      2m 38s
  7. 34m 8s
    1. Evaluating the piece for finishing goals
      7m 11s
    2. Polishing the final audio mix
      7m 49s
    3. Correcting color for consistency
      9m 49s
    4. Adjusting the title and animations for the best compression
      5m 56s
    5. Exporting multiple files
      3m 23s
  8. 50s
    1. Next steps
      50s

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