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Saving as a video

From: PowerPoint 2010 New Features

Video: Saving as a video

When we are finished creating a presentation, we need an audience. Sometimes that audience is on social networking sites, such as Facebook and YouTube; sometimes they are on the couch watching TV; sometimes they are on a mobile device. PowerPoint 2010 allows you to save your finished presentation as a video, whether you can upload to your blog or social network, burn to a DVD or transfer to just about any device. Before we can turn our slideshow into a video, we need to consider how we want the slides to advance. If you have already set recordings on every slide, then you are set, but most of the time our slides only advance when the mouse is clicked.

Saving as a video

When we are finished creating a presentation, we need an audience. Sometimes that audience is on social networking sites, such as Facebook and YouTube; sometimes they are on the couch watching TV; sometimes they are on a mobile device. PowerPoint 2010 allows you to save your finished presentation as a video, whether you can upload to your blog or social network, burn to a DVD or transfer to just about any device. Before we can turn our slideshow into a video, we need to consider how we want the slides to advance. If you have already set recordings on every slide, then you are set, but most of the time our slides only advance when the mouse is clicked.

In a video, there is no mouse. So PowerPoint gives us two options. We can record timings, along with optional narration, and use that for automatic advancement in the video, or we can specify a default duration for slide advancement, which will be applied to any slides that don't have their own setting. When we access the Backstage view and click Save and Send, we can see the Create a Video Option under the File Types. The right half of the screen describes the procedure and gives us two options - first, quality.

Higher quality takes more space and takes longer to send, but the image is going to look better. Two, timing. As we discussed earlier, you can use recorded timings or specify a default time for each slide without a setting. When we click Create Video, we are asked for a file name and location to save to. Then we are done. We can now take our finished video file in WMV format and send it off, upload it, or burn it to a DVD. Now that our file is finished saving as a video, let's go ahead and take a look, and see what it looks like.

Here is the file that PowerPoint created. Notice that it is a Windows Media Audio/ Video file, and you will see that this file is actually quite large, 125 MGs; of course the only reason it's that large is because it contains a one- minute video inside it. Let's go ahead and double-click on this video. We will open it up in Windows Media Player, and here it is. You can see that it includes the audio, video, and all the animations and transitions that we had in our original presentation.

Just like a regular video, I can skip to any point of the presentation, and the person watching this can watch this on YouTube, Facebook, any mobile device, or you can burn the file directly to a DVD, and let them watch at their comfort of their own home. Remember that video files can be quite large. Here is a few things that will increase the file size and therefore take longer to send: audio, including any narration, sound effects or music, transitions of any kind - especially when there is a complex background image - animation - to some degree - and of course video.

To learn more about specifying durations for individual slides, or recording timings and narrations, please watch the PowerPoint 2010 Essentials Training video.

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PowerPoint 2010 New Features

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David Diskin
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