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PowerPoint 2010 New Features
Illustration by Neil Webb

Adding, editing, and playing video


From:

PowerPoint 2010 New Features

with David Diskin

Video: Adding, editing, and playing video

For years, PowerPoint has been able to import video, but the options offered beyond that have been scarce. PowerPoint 2010 gives presenters a whole new array of options to control their video and create an even more interesting presentation. One difficulty you may run into while attempting to bring video into your presentation is compatibility; however, PowerPoint 2010 is more compatible with video formats than prior versions. In fact, PowerPoint 2010 even gives us the ability to embed videos found on YouTube, Hulu, and other video sharing web sites.

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PowerPoint 2010 New Features
1h 7m Appropriate for all May 20, 2010

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

In PowerPoint 2010 New Features, David Diskin explores the latest version of Microsoft's presentation software. This course covers themes and transitions, the ability to add equations and over forty new SmartArt diagrams to presentations, new photo retouching and video editing features, and new ways to collaborate and share presentations across the Internet. Exercise files accompany the course.

Topics include:
  • Customizing the Ribbon interface
  • Using the new Backstage View
  • Saving time with the Animation Painter
  • Styling a presentation with themes and transitions
  • Introducing new ways to work with video
  • Using the enhanced photo editing features such as cropping, removing backgrounds, and artistic effects
  • Broadcasting a presentation on the Web
  • Merging, comparing, and collaborating on presentations
Subject:
Business
Software:
PowerPoint
Author:
David Diskin

Adding, editing, and playing video

For years, PowerPoint has been able to import video, but the options offered beyond that have been scarce. PowerPoint 2010 gives presenters a whole new array of options to control their video and create an even more interesting presentation. One difficulty you may run into while attempting to bring video into your presentation is compatibility; however, PowerPoint 2010 is more compatible with video formats than prior versions. In fact, PowerPoint 2010 even gives us the ability to embed videos found on YouTube, Hulu, and other video sharing web sites.

On our second slide, we are going to insert a two-minute promotional video to get our employees pumped up about Two Trees Olive Oil. From here, we'll click on the Insert tab up on the Ribbon, and on the far right we'll pull down the Video menu. You can see that we can add a video from a file located on our hard drive or on the network, or choose Clip Art video from Microsoft Office Online. We are going to go ahead and add a video from a file. And from our Assets folder, we are going to add the Video Tour by selecting it and clicking Insert.

The entire video is converted and imported into PowerPoint, as you can see here represented by this black box. When the object is selected, not only do you have the Video tools tabs up above Format and Playback, but you will also see that the video has a Play button, Forward and Backwards, a Timer, and a Volume adjust button. If I click Play - Male speaker: You can see that it's got quite a few olives. (Male Speaker: Most of the olives are still a light green.) the video begins to play.

I can also jump to other points and continue the Playback. (Male Speaker: to the centerfuge. What happens inside of here is that you have - ) Now that our video has been inserted, we can move it around, resize it, even rotate it. In fact, nearly every single feature you would expect to be able to use with a photo can be used on the video, as well. For example, I can pull down Video Styles and choose to apply a shape, outline, shadow, and more, to our new video.

(Male Speaker: Three different layers. On the outside - ) I can pull down Corrections, and just like with the photo, add color corrections, like brightness and contrast, change the color, and even add features like reflection. Now, when I hit Play - (Male speaker: You can see that it's got quite a few olives.) I'll see the finished result. (Male Speaker: Most of the olives are still a light green.) I am going to make a quick little adjustment and resize this just a little bit more.

I am also going to right-click on it and send it to back, so it's behind the overlay that I created earlier. Let's go ahead and press Shift+F5, so we can see what the audience will see in fullscreen mode. Here you can see the placeholder for our video, ready to go. When I take my mouse and hover it over the placeholder, the Playback bar appears below, just as it did earlier. I can hit Play - (Male speaker: You can see that it's got quite a few olives.) and our video begins. (Male Speaker: Most of the olives are still a light green.) I am going to press Escape now and return back to my Editing mode.

Let's go ahead and reset some of the effects that we've added. I am going to pull down the Reset Design menu, which clears out any color, corrections, and video styles applied to the video. Now, with our video, we are going to adjust the Playback. By clicking on the video, and choosing Video tools > Playback tab, you'll see that there are quite a few things we can adjust. For example, I can make the video start automatically rather than waiting for me to click on it. Here you'll see the Start menu, where I can pull down and choose, changing it from On Click to Automatically.

Other options here include the Volume, whether or not I want it to play full screen, to hide the window when it's not playing, to continue to looping it, or to rewind it automatically. We are going to leave those off. Moving over to the left, you can see there is also the ability to trim the video. The video we brought in originally is two minutes long, far longer than I want to show my audience. I am going to trim out the first 30 seconds or so, and the last 30 seconds or so to make this a nice, short, one-minute video. By clicking on Trim Video, this dialog box appears.

You can see that the entire duration is about two minutes, and by adjusting the beginning and ending points of my video, I can control when this is going to start and finish. I'll make some minor adjustments here, make some other adjustments here, and click OK. Now when I hit Play, (Video playing.) it starts exactly where I wanted it to.

Of course, since I don't want it to jump right into that loud music, I am going to adjust a fade. I am going to say, to take three seconds fading in, and at the end of the video, another three seconds, or maybe more, to fade out. Let's see what this does. (Music playing.) That's a little smoother. Let's move the slider to the right, and we'll see how this finishes out. (Male Speaker: Go into this next piece of equipment.) There we go.

A nice, quiet fade out. One more time, we'll press Shift+F5 to see this as the audience would. The video automatically plays, fades in, continues on for about a minute, (Male Speaker: When the olives are brought in in these boxes, they're emptied in this hopper.) and soon fades out. Then, like any other slide, we can click to advance to the next slide. Now that we have accomplished that task, let's talk about another amazing new enhancement.

We can embed videos straight from video sharing sites, such as Hulu and YouTube. We are going to include on our presentation a slide that mentions our YouTube channel. I want to advance to slide number 13. Right after it, click on New Slide, and just change the layout to something a little bit more appropriate, like this blank one right here. On our new Blank slide, I am going to click on the Insert tab on the Ribbon and go to the far right, where I can pull down the Video menu and choose Video from Web Site. A quick side note, for this feature you must have the Adobe Flash plug-in installed, and you must be running on the 32-bit version of Microsoft Office.

When I click on this command, a window pops up asking me for a link to the video that I want to embed. Now I'll switch over to my browser, where I have already found the video, Explore California Weekly Podcast. On YouTube, the code that I want to embed can often be found by finding the Embed button, clicking on it, and then copying and pasting the code that appears. Other web sites might have different methods for giving you the code, but they are all generally the same. You will find the word Embed and copy the code that's made available to you.

Once I've copied that code, I'll return back to PowerPoint, click into this window and hit Paste, or Ctrl+V. Don't worry about what the code says, just go ahead and click on Insert. Give PowerPoint a moment to access the file, and you will see it appear on the black box on the slide. Unlike video that I have added from my own hard drive, a video that's been made available through the web can't be modified. I can't change color corrections or even apply styles, but I can move it around the screen and resize it. Once this is done, I am going to press Shift+F5 to see how it looks.

I'll click on Play, (Video playing.) and there is our video. PowerPoint 2010's powerful video features make it a worthwhile upgrade alone. Keep in mind that if you try to import a video, and it fails, you may be able to convert it to another format. The Windows Live Movie Player can often do just that, and it's a free download from Microsoft.

There are currently no FAQs about PowerPoint 2010 New Features.

 
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