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Understanding proper pinning etiquette

From: Up and Running with Pinterest

Video: Understanding proper pinning etiquette

Up until now you've heard me refer to pinning etiquette and being respectful and giving attribution to the things that you pin on Pinterest. This is something that has come under fire recently because Pinterest hasn't done a whole lot to alleviate the pain that is being caused by this. Basically what's happening is, when people are pinning things they are not getting proper attribution to the people who actually created the item that they're pinning. So they might find a cool piece of art or a photograph or something, and they're just posting it to Pinterest saying "oh, this is neat," "oh, this is cool" and they are not actually saying "this was taken by so-and-so," or "I found this here and this is who created it." And so Pinterest has had to respond to this by coming up with a pin etiquette page on their site. And so I am not going to bore you by reading all of this, but the main thing that I want to focus on is point number three on this list, where it says Credit Your Sources, that pins are most useful when they have links back to the original source.

Understanding proper pinning etiquette

Up until now you've heard me refer to pinning etiquette and being respectful and giving attribution to the things that you pin on Pinterest. This is something that has come under fire recently because Pinterest hasn't done a whole lot to alleviate the pain that is being caused by this. Basically what's happening is, when people are pinning things they are not getting proper attribution to the people who actually created the item that they're pinning. So they might find a cool piece of art or a photograph or something, and they're just posting it to Pinterest saying "oh, this is neat," "oh, this is cool" and they are not actually saying "this was taken by so-and-so," or "I found this here and this is who created it." And so Pinterest has had to respond to this by coming up with a pin etiquette page on their site. And so I am not going to bore you by reading all of this, but the main thing that I want to focus on is point number three on this list, where it says Credit Your Sources, that pins are most useful when they have links back to the original source.

If you notice that a pin is not sourced correctly, leave a comment so the original pinner can update the source. Finding the original source is always preferable to a secondary source such as an image search or a blog entry. So basically what Pinterest is trying to get you to do is give credit where credit is due, and that's very important. So for instance, if I wanted to grab something off of the web that is a product or a photograph or something like that, I need to do my due diligence to find exactly where that comes from. Pinterest has put some things in place that makes it a little bit easier for us to do that though.

For instance, let's jump over to this Etsy page, and let's say that I wanted to grab this necklace from this Etsy page and share it somewhere on my Pinterest profile. In order to do that, I can click Pin It and it automatically finds what I need and I'll click Pin It. Check this out. It automatically puts up the price based on the Etsy price and it also gives the item name, how much it costs, and it gives attribution, saying it came from Etsy, which is very important. That links back to the original place, and it gives you the information telling you that this is where it's from.

This is how much it costs, and this is how you get it. So if I were to create a new board--and I'll just call this Cool Stuff and hit Create-- I'll click Pin It and it creates my pin. I'll click See your Pin so it takes me back. You can see here it says from etsy.com. That's proper attribution. That is absolutely the way to go. And if I scroll down to the bottom, you can see the name of the item, how much it costs, and where it came from. It tells me that it was Pinned via the pinmarklet, which is this item here, and if I happen to click on the photo itself, it takes me right back to the Etsy page.

Whereas if I go back to one of these other pins that I have in my boards--for instance one of these that I uploaded--I'll click on this and then I'll go to the pin, and what happens when I click on this pin that I simply uploaded? Nothing. It takes me to a larger version of this that has been uploaded to the Pinterest servers. It doesn't take me back to the original file; it doesn't give attribution to the original artist or the original photographer. I have no idea where this came from, and neither does anyone else. That's not doing anyone any good. Because if somebody finds this pin and says "oh, this is neat. I want to know where they found this," I haven't given them a way to get back to that.

They can't find this dress. They can't find this beach. They don't know who took the photo so they can hire them to take their photo. So it's a big, big deal to make sure that you properly give attribution to the items that you're pinning, and also try to pin things via the Pin It button so that Pinterest can aid you in giving proper attribution and a link back to the original location as well. Remember, Pinterest is nothing more than an aggregate of information, but the information can be quite useful, as long as we allow people to interact with it in a proper way. And giving attribution and links back is always a good thing.

So, hopefully by now you have a better understanding of what pinning etiquette is and why you should care about it, and also how you can take some steps into improving the way you pin so that you're a little bit more responsible.

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Up and Running with Pinterest

35 video lessons · 12728 viewers

Justin Seeley
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