New Feature: Playlist Center! Pick a topic and let our playlists guide the way—like a learning mixtape.

Start learning with our library of video tutorials taught by experts. Get started

Photoshop Black-and-White Workshop
Illustration by

A classic car


From:

Photoshop Black-and-White Workshop

with Tim Grey

Video: A classic car

Sometimes, a subject just begs for a black and white interpretation. That tends to be especially the case when a subject is something that harkens back to an older time. In this case, I have an image of an old car set against the backdrop of a classic hotel. And so, a black and white interpretation seems a natural fit. In fact, to me, this image conveys the mood of an old classic movie. So I'll keep that vision in mind as I'm working. To get started, I'll add a Black and White Adjustment Layer, which of course, is the first step in making a black and white image in most cases. And I'll start working with the various sliders here to see what it might do to the image. I want to pay attention to which areas are affected by each of my sliders as I adjust them.

Watch this entire course now—plus get access to every course in the library. Each course includes high-quality videos taught by expert instructors.

Become a member
please wait ...
Photoshop Black-and-White Workshop
1h 49m Intermediate Dec 23, 2010

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

There's nothing quite like a great black-and-white image. In this workshop, author and trainer Tim Grey shows you how to create the best possible black-and-white interpretations of color photographs using Adobe Photoshop. From very basic grayscale conversions to advanced multiple-channel blending using layer masks, Tim explores a wide variety of methods that you can use to produce the best black-and-white results. Afterwards, tackle a set of real-world projects that combine a variety of techniques to produce the final image. Note: This course was recorded in Photoshop CS5, but was created with users of both Photoshop CS5 and Photoshop CS4 in mind.

Topics include:
  • Understanding channels
  • Desaturating
  • Using the Lab color mode
  • Adding a black-and-white adjustment layer
  • Adding a color tint
  • Applying a Curves adjustment
  • Using the Gradient Map adjustment
  • Adding a vignette or film grain
  • Dodging and burning
  • Selective black-and-white
Subjects:
Photography video2brain Black and White
Software:
Photoshop
Author:
Tim Grey

A classic car

Sometimes, a subject just begs for a black and white interpretation. That tends to be especially the case when a subject is something that harkens back to an older time. In this case, I have an image of an old car set against the backdrop of a classic hotel. And so, a black and white interpretation seems a natural fit. In fact, to me, this image conveys the mood of an old classic movie. So I'll keep that vision in mind as I'm working. To get started, I'll add a Black and White Adjustment Layer, which of course, is the first step in making a black and white image in most cases. And I'll start working with the various sliders here to see what it might do to the image. I want to pay attention to which areas are affected by each of my sliders as I adjust them.

I could also use the On-Image adjustment. But in this case, I think I'll just explore around with the different sliders and see what it does to the image. Now, I definitely like the brightening effect of the white walls, but I need to be careful that the chrome doesn't get too hot. So I don't think that I can get the white walls as bright as I like. So we'll come back and use a different technique for that. And finally, taking a look at the magentas, not much influence there. And so, this seems to be a pretty good starting point for my basic conversion. I would like a bit more contrast though, so I'm going to add a Curves Adjustment Layer, and then I'll apply a bit of an S-curve here.

Darkening up the dark areas and brightening up the brights, but I need to be careful about the specific adjustment I apply. Again, I don't want to produce too bright an area in the chrome, and I don't want to darken the overall shadows too much. So I think I'm going to add an extra anchor point to keep the shadow areas from getting too dark and I might actually brighten up some of the other shadow areas. That's looking a little bit better. We're getting something that looks a little bit more contrasty. I'll turn off the eye for the Curves Adjustment later so we can see the before, and then, click again to see the after.

As you can see, it's a relatively subtle change, just increasing contrast a little bit. Now, I would like to brighten up the white wall just a little bit, and I think I might darken this portion of the fender, so I'm going to add a Dodge and Burn layer. I'll hold the Alt key on Windows or the Option key on Macintosh while clicking to create a new layer button. I'll call this layer Dodge and Burns since that's what I'm using this layer for and I'll change the blend mode for the layer to overlay. I'll then check the box to fill this layer with the overlay neutral color of 50% gray. I'll click OK, and then press the letter B to access my Brush tool, and the letter D for my default colors, and the letter X to swap those colors, so that white is my foreground color.

I'll work with a Soft Edge Brush, but I'll set my Opacity down to probably about 10 or 15%. I'll use 15% in this case. I'll use the left and right square bracket keys to reduce or enlarge the brush as needed, and then in this case, I'll paint across the white wall. Actually I think maybe we can go a little brighter with that, so I'll take another swipe with my brush tool here, painting with white to lighten it up a little bit. And then I'll press X to switch the foreground and background colors, so that black is my foreground color and I'll paint with black across the top of the fender here to darken that up just a little bit.

And maybe I might darken up underneath the car here just a hair. But otherwise, I think we're in pretty good shape.there. I think I'd like to add a vignette effect for this image, so I'll hold the Alt key on Windows or the Option key on Macintosh while clicking to add a new layer. We'll call this one Vignette, change the blend mode to Multiply,and click to turn on the check box to fill with the multiplying neutral color. I'll then choose Filter > Lens Correction, and I'm going to go to the custom tap and then apply a darkening vignette.

Now I only want this vignette to appear right in the corners of the image just at the very, very edges, and so, I'll actually increase the midpoint value a little bit so that the midpoint spreads out and only the extreme edges of the image are affected. I'll then click OK, and I can reduce the Opacity to tone down the effect just a little bit. Turning this layer on and off, you can see that I've actually had a pretty strong effect on the image helping to pull you down into the center. Now I like the direction I've taken this image but I think actually what would give it a little bit more of that classic feel would be a sepia tone effect.

So I'll scroll down on my layers panel to my Black and White Adjustment Layer and click on it, so that I can see the controls for the Black and White Layer on the Adjustments panel. I'll click to turn on the tint check box, and then I'll click on the color swatch to bring up the color picker. Now, I want something that's not very saturated and maybe just a little bit warm. I don't want it to be too yellow or too orange, something like that, but a little less saturated. Right about in there I think. It's not going to take too much color to give just a little hint of color to the image and give it a nice sort of Dusty old appearance.

That's looking pretty good, so I'll click OK. And as you can see, by thinking about how the subject would be best represented, you can often produce a black and white interpretation that is more impactful than might otherwise be possible with a color image.

There are currently no FAQs about Photoshop Black-and-White Workshop.

 
Share a link to this course

What are exercise files?

Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course. Save time by downloading the author's files instead of setting up your own files, and learn by following along with the instructor.

Can I take this course without the exercise files?

Yes! If you decide you would like the exercise files later, you can upgrade to a premium account any time.

Become a member Download sample files See plans and pricing

Please wait... please wait ...
Upgrade to get access to exercise files.

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Learn by watching, listening, and doing, Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along Premium memberships include access to all exercise files in the library.
Upgrade now


Exercise files

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

For additional information on downloading and using exercise files, watch our instructional video or read the instructions in the FAQ.

This course includes free exercise files, so you can practice while you watch the course. To access all the exercise files in our library, become a Premium Member.

join now Upgrade now

Are you sure you want to mark all the videos in this course as unwatched?

This will not affect your course history, your reports, or your certificates of completion for this course.


Mark all as unwatched Cancel

Congratulations

You have completed Photoshop Black-and-White Workshop.

Return to your organization's learning portal to continue training, or close this page.


OK
Become a member to add this course to a playlist

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses—and create as many playlists as you like.

Get started

Already a member?

Become a member to like this course.

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses.

Get started

Already a member?

Exercise files

Learn by watching, listening, and doing! Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along. Exercise files are available with all Premium memberships. Learn more

Get started

Already a Premium member?

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Ask a question

Thanks for contacting us.
You’ll hear from our Customer Service team within 24 hours.

Please enter the text shown below:

The classic layout automatically defaults to the latest Flash Player.

To choose a different player, hold the cursor over your name at the top right of any lynda.com page and choose Site preferencesfrom the dropdown menu.

Continue to classic layout Stay on new layout
Exercise files

Access exercise files from a button right under the course name.

Mark videos as unwatched

Remove icons showing you already watched videos if you want to start over.

Control your viewing experience

Make the video wide, narrow, full-screen, or pop the player out of the page into its own window.

Interactive transcripts

Click on text in the transcript to jump to that spot in the video. As the video plays, the relevant spot in the transcript will be highlighted.

Are you sure you want to delete this note?

No

Notes cannot be added for locked videos.

Thanks for signing up.

We’ll send you a confirmation email shortly.


Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

Keep up with news, tips, and latest courses with emails from lynda.com.

Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

   
submit Lightbox submit clicked
Terms and conditions of use

We've updated our terms and conditions (now called terms of service).Go
Review and accept our updated terms of service.