Easy-to-follow video tutorials help you learn software, creative, and business skills.Become a member

Sizing

From: Photoshop CS5: Landscape Photography

Video: Sizing

No one takes pictures just to correct and edit them, of course. At some point you want to get your pictures out into the world, either as print or delivered as electronic images via e-mail or the web. To preserve the best possible image quality for your output though, you need to follow a fairly strict procedure when outputting your files, and that process begins with sizing your image for output. Most digital cameras these days capture a tremendous number of pixels, tens of millions of them in some cases. And very often these are far more pixels than you need. To get accurate results when sharpening and to speed the process of printing or saving and transmitting a file, it's best to size your image to the print side that you want using Photoshop.

Sizing

No one takes pictures just to correct and edit them, of course. At some point you want to get your pictures out into the world, either as print or delivered as electronic images via e-mail or the web. To preserve the best possible image quality for your output though, you need to follow a fairly strict procedure when outputting your files, and that process begins with sizing your image for output. Most digital cameras these days capture a tremendous number of pixels, tens of millions of them in some cases. And very often these are far more pixels than you need. To get accurate results when sharpening and to speed the process of printing or saving and transmitting a file, it's best to size your image to the print side that you want using Photoshop.

We are going to size this image, with the idea of making an 8X10 inch print out of it. Now whether we were going to a bigger print size or an electronic file, we would still use the same tool for sizing our image. We are going to assume an 8 x 10 inch print. In Photoshop, all image sizing is done by going to the Image menu and choosing Image Size, which brings up Photoshop's Image Size dialog box, which is not just how you can resize your image. It's also a nice little calculator for determining how big an image might be able to go before you start seeing some visible degradation.

The Image Size dialog box is divided into two areas. There is Pixel Dimensions. These are how many pixels are in my image? This image is 4300 x 2900 pixels. Then there is Document Size. This is how big of a print will come out of this particular group of pixels. So right now, if I were to print this, it would be 18 x 12 inches because it has a resolution of 240 pixels per inch. In other words, if I take these 4,368 pixels and line them up so that there are 240 of them per inch, I will have a width of 18 inches.

Let's do a little digging around in the dialog box here. I am going to uncheck this Resample Image box. Resample means that Photoshop is allowed to throw out pixels or make up new pixels. When Resample Image is checked, all of these boxes are editable. I'm going to uncheck it. And you'll notice the first thing that happens is Width and Height are no longer editable, Width and Height in Pixel Dimensions, I mean. I cannot change the number of pixels in an image. All I can do is change the Print Size. So I'm fixed at having 4300 x 2900 pixels.

Let's say I change this to 10 inches. Photoshop automatically calculates that for the size of this image, 10 inches wide, my height will be 6.667 inches, to be precise, at a resolution of 436.8. So let's talk about this problem first. I said I wanted an 8 x 10. Well 8 x 10 is not a three to two aspect ratio, and that's what this image was shot at. So there is no way that I can get an 8X10 without cropping. So I am going to give up on the 8 x 10 idea, and say, well, I'll put this in something that's 10 inches wide.

And I'll just have some extra space about and below so it will be 10 x 6. We will talk about cropping it down later. That's an additional option. But I really composed of this image within the full frame, so I'd rather not crop it. However, when I sized my image down to 10 inches, my Resolution went way up. Because again, I've got 4,300 pixels, that can not change, so the only way to get an image that's 10 inches wide is to crush the pixels in closer together so that there are 436.8 of them for every inch. Do I care what the Resolution is? I certainly care what the Resolution is if the Resolution is too low.

Do I care about having too much? Yes. You don't necessarily have to, but it's a good idea to build resolution that's appropriate for your printer, for a couple reasons. It'll make your files smaller. It will make your printing go quicker because you won't have as much data to transmit to the printer, and the printer won't have to sit there and chug through a whole bunch of extra pixels that it doesn't need. And it will make your sharpening efforts possibly more accurate. On a desktop inkjet photo printer, that is a printer that has six or more ink cartridges in it, you really never need a resolution higher than 240 pixels per inch.

You can go up to 300, that's okay, but 240 is kind of about as good as you need. If you were to take this out to another printing technology, maybe to send it to an offset printing place, they might want 300. So let's just go ahead at 300, and then we will have an option for printing on an inkjet or some other way. So if I change Resolution now to 300, uh oh. Now my Width changed. It went back up to 14. Again, this is because I cannot lose any pixels in this image, because these aren't editable right now.

And Photoshop indicates this by showing that all three of these fields are linked together. I cannot change one without the other. You can think of pixels as a quantity of brown sugar. You can pour a certain amount of brown sugar into one size cup and fill it up to the top. You could then take that brown sugar and stick it in a smaller cup and possibly crunch it down to fit in there. You're not changing the size of the brown sugar grains, but you are compressing them closer together. You're increasing the resolution, the density. That's what we are doing with these pixels. What I would like to do is be able to have 10 inches wide at 300.

But again, I can't do that right now because these three things are linked together. To unlink them and get what I want, I have to check the Resample Image box. So now these are editable. I've got a Width 10 inches. If you notice, I currently have 4300 pixels for 72 mega-pixels worth of data. If I crunch this down to 300, my pixel count just dropped a lot. It dropped down to 3000 and my overall dimension is changed. So now I have a 10 x 6 at 300 pixels per inch.

This is now resized properly for print. Let's look though at trying to get an actual 8 x 10 out of this. There is no way I can get 8 x 10 out of this using the Image Size dialog box, because if I put 8 in here, 10 will change because Width and Height are linked together because I have Constrain Proportions checked. So I have to actually go into a crop now to get this down to 8 x 10. I am going to cancel out of here. So no changes have been made. And I am going to grab Photoshop's Crop tool.

I can specify, though, the dimensions that I would like to crop to. I would like 10 inches wide and 8 inches high. I don't have to fill in the Resolution field if I don't want to, but I'll go ahead and put it at 300. That'll just save me from having to type that in later in Camera Raw. And I am going to hit the Caps Lock key to change from the Crop tool cursor just to crosshairs, because I find that easier. And I am going to start dragging a crop. Now this is a constrained crop. I can only drag out something that is the correct aspect ratio for 8 x 10.

So Photoshop CS5 has a couple of new features in its Crop tool. It's got this Crop Guide Overlay, which lets me display these different grids and things. I don't actually want those right now; those are distracting. And as in previous versions of Photoshop, I have this shield that comes over here that hides more of my image. I can change the color of it how pink it is and just trying to give me a preview of what the crop will look like. So my goal here now is to find a good crop. And I'll say, right off the bat, that I'm not going to think any of these are good crops, because I really framed this in the camera the way that I wanted.

But really the big part of his image is this cloud thing right here. I could take this crop. It looks weird to me because I've got all these stuff up here. So I am going to try squeezing that down to there to bring a little more focus just to this big, brightly-colored thing here. So the image is losing a lot, but I am going to go ahead and take that crop. Photoshop is going to think about it. And when it's done, I'll go to the Image Size dialog box and double check that it has put my crop where I want it.

Image > Image Size, and now I have a 10 x 8 at 300. So if I had to fit this into a particular frame size, or output to a particular size to go on a specific size box in a web page or something like that, I could do that very easily with the Crop tool. So this is the Image Size dialog box. You will be using it probably on every image that you output. If you're going out to the web, you will possibly have specific pixel dimensions in mind. You might need to output an image that's 640 x 480.

I can just type 640 in here. And then I see that okay I've got the wrong aspect ratio for 640 x 480, because that would be a four to three aspect ratio. Anyway, I could work through this again and get those to the sizes that I want. How large should you go for print? A lot of people think that, well, if my printer wants 300 dots per inch then I have to always have 300 dots per inch. And that's not true, because as an image goes larger, you view it from farther away. If you're printing out 11 x 17 or 13 x 19 inch image you are probably going to frame that and hang it on the wall.

You're inherently going to stand at a greater distance from that then you would a 4 x 6, which you are going to hold in your hand and look at. So as image size goes up, the resolution that you need can go down. Now we are going to talk about enlarging and reduction in the next lesson.

Show transcript

This video is part of

Image for Photoshop CS5: Landscape Photography
Photoshop CS5: Landscape Photography

59 video lessons · 22270 viewers

Ben Long
Author

 
Expand all | Collapse all
  1. 3m 14s
    1. Welcome
      1m 44s
    2. Using the exercise files
      1m 30s
  2. 46m 35s
    1. Defining landscape photography
      2m 23s
    2. Considering cameras and gear
      10m 41s
    3. Shooting and composition tips
      6m 39s
    4. Why you should shoot raw instead of JPEG
      4m 25s
    5. Making selects
      10m 42s
    6. Understanding the histogram
      6m 53s
    7. A little color theory
      4m 52s
  3. 1h 14m
    1. Opening an image
      4m 42s
    2. Cropping and straightening
      9m 56s
    3. Nondestructive editing
      6m 23s
    4. Spotting and cleanup
      3m 53s
    5. Cleaning the camera sensor
      11m 17s
    6. Lens correction
      6m 26s
    7. Correcting overexposed highlights
      7m 29s
    8. Basic tonal correction
      5m 45s
    9. Correcting blacks
      11m 54s
    10. Correcting white balance
      6m 35s
  4. 21m 34s
    1. Performing localized edits with the Gradient Filter tool
      7m 24s
    2. Performing localized edits with the Adjustment brush
      7m 54s
    3. Controlling brush and gradient edits
      6m 16s
  5. 16m 34s
    1. Working with noise reduction
      5m 33s
    2. Clarity and sharpening
      5m 23s
    3. Exiting Camera Raw
      5m 38s
  6. 58m 5s
    1. Retouching
      8m 23s
    2. Using Levels adjustment layers
      10m 59s
    3. Saving images with adjustment layers
      4m 18s
    4. Advanced Levels adjustment layers
      9m 36s
    5. Guiding the viewer's eye with Levels
      8m 48s
    6. Using gradient masks for multiple adjustments
      5m 32s
    7. Correcting color in JPEG images
      3m 15s
    8. Adding a vignette
      3m 25s
    9. Knowing when edits have gone too far
      3m 49s
  7. 33m 24s
    1. Preparing to stitch
      5m 59s
    2. Stitching
      7m 39s
    3. Panoramic touchup
      7m 17s
    4. Shooting a panorama
      4m 58s
    5. Stitching a panorama
      7m 31s
  8. 27m 18s
    1. Shooting an HDR Image
      7m 53s
    2. Merging with HDR Pro
      11m 52s
    3. Adjusting and retouching
      7m 33s
  9. 24m 4s
    1. Why use black and white for images?
      2m 26s
    2. Black-and-white conversion
      7m 13s
    3. Correcting tone in black-and-white images
      7m 38s
    4. Adding highlights to black-and-white images
      6m 47s
  10. 49m 32s
    1. Painting light and shadow pt. 1
      11m 22s
    2. Painting light and shadow pt. 2
      12m 42s
    3. Painting light and shadow pt. 3
      9m 19s
    4. HDR + LDR
      5m 7s
    5. Reviewing sample images for inspiration
      11m 2s
  11. 48m 2s
    1. Sizing
      9m 8s
    2. Enlarging and reducing
      5m 3s
    3. Saving
      1m 24s
    4. Sharpening
      8m 23s
    5. Outputting an electronic file
      9m 4s
    6. Making a web gallery
      4m 17s
    7. Printing
      10m 43s
  12. 20s
    1. Goodbye
      20s

Start learning today

Get unlimited access to all courses for just $25/month.

Become a member
Sometimes @lynda teaches me how to use a program and sometimes Lynda.com changes my life forever. @JosefShutter
@lynda lynda.com is an absolute life saver when it comes to learning todays software. Definitely recommend it! #higherlearning @Michael_Caraway
@lynda The best thing online! Your database of courses is great! To the mark and very helpful. Thanks! @ru22more
Got to create something yesterday I never thought I could do. #thanks @lynda @Ngventurella
I really do love @lynda as a learning platform. Never stop learning and developing, it’s probably our greatest gift as a species! @soundslikedavid
@lynda just subscribed to lynda.com all I can say its brilliant join now trust me @ButchSamurai
@lynda is an awesome resource. The membership is priceless if you take advantage of it. @diabetic_techie
One of the best decision I made this year. Buy a 1yr subscription to @lynda @cybercaptive
guys lynda.com (@lynda) is the best. So far I’ve learned Java, principles of OO programming, and now learning about MS project @lucasmitchell
Signed back up to @lynda dot com. I’ve missed it!! Proper geeking out right now! #timetolearn #geek @JayGodbold
Share a link to this course

What are exercise files?

Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course. Save time by downloading the author's files instead of setting up your own files, and learn by following along with the instructor.

Can I take this course without the exercise files?

Yes! If you decide you would like the exercise files later, you can upgrade to a premium account any time.

Become a member Download sample files See plans and pricing

Please wait... please wait ...
Upgrade to get access to exercise files.

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Learn by watching, listening, and doing, Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along Premium memberships include access to all exercise files in the library.


Exercise files

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

For additional information on downloading and using exercise files, watch our instructional video or read the instructions in the FAQ.

This course includes free exercise files, so you can practice while you watch the course. To access all the exercise files in our library, become a Premium Member.

Join now "Already a member? Log in

Are you sure you want to mark all the videos in this course as unwatched?

This will not affect your course history, your reports, or your certificates of completion for this course.


Mark all as unwatched Cancel

Congratulations

You have completed Photoshop CS5: Landscape Photography.

Return to your organization's learning portal to continue training, or close this page.


OK
Become a member to add this course to a playlist

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses—and create as many playlists as you like.

Get started

Already a member?

Become a member to like this course.

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses.

Get started

Already a member?

Exercise files

Learn by watching, listening, and doing! Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along. Exercise files are available with all Premium memberships. Learn more

Get started

Already a Premium member?

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Ask a question

Thanks for contacting us.
You’ll hear from our Customer Service team within 24 hours.

Please enter the text shown below:

The classic layout automatically defaults to the latest Flash Player.

To choose a different player, hold the cursor over your name at the top right of any lynda.com page and choose Site preferencesfrom the dropdown menu.

Continue to classic layout Stay on new layout
Exercise files

Access exercise files from a button right under the course name.

Mark videos as unwatched

Remove icons showing you already watched videos if you want to start over.

Control your viewing experience

Make the video wide, narrow, full-screen, or pop the player out of the page into its own window.

Interactive transcripts

Click on text in the transcript to jump to that spot in the video. As the video plays, the relevant spot in the transcript will be highlighted.

Are you sure you want to delete this note?

No

Your file was successfully uploaded.

Thanks for signing up.

We’ll send you a confirmation email shortly.


Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

Keep up with news, tips, and latest courses with emails from lynda.com.

Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

   
submit Lightbox submit clicked
Terms and conditions of use

We've updated our terms and conditions (now called terms of service).Go
Review and accept our updated terms of service.