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Foundations of Photography: Black and White
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How a camera's image sensor captures an image


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Foundations of Photography: Black and White

with Ben Long

Video: How a camera's image sensor captures an image

In the back of your camera, directly behind the lens, is a small computer chip that has an area of light- sensitive material on it. This is the camera's image sensor, and it's what actually captures light and makes an image. It's the digital equivalent of a piece of film, or the back of your eyeball. The surface of the image sensor is divided into a grid, with one cell for each pixel that the sensor can capture. So if you have a 10-megapixel camera, the sensor is divided into a grid of 10 million cells.
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  1. 8m 25s
    1. Welcome
      1m 24s
    2. Why black and white?
      5m 12s
    3. Suggested prerequisites
      53s
    4. Using the exercise files
      56s
  2. 19m 43s
    1. Is it really black and white?
      1m 9s
    2. How gray corresponds to color
      4m 38s
    3. The medium of black and white
      3m 5s
    4. The vocabulary of black and white
      4m 46s
    5. The physiology of black and white
      2m 22s
    6. How a camera's image sensor captures an image
      3m 43s
  3. 32m 46s
    1. Preparing the camera
      3m 34s
    2. Light revisited
      6m 3s
    3. Seeing in black and white
      2m 21s
    4. Taking a black-and-white expedition
      1m 17s
    5. Finding and shooting a black-and-white image
      11m 14s
    6. Shooting a tone-based subject
      2m 0s
    7. Exposing for black and white
      6m 17s
  4. 1h 38m
    1. The nature of grayscale images
      3m 33s
    2. Converting to black and white using Photoshop CS4 or CS5
      6m 17s
    3. More about the Black & White dialog box
      3m 19s
    4. Converting to black and white using Black & White adjustment layers
      3m 55s
    5. Converting to black and white in Camera Raw
      4m 5s
    6. Making an advanced tonal correction
      17m 33s
    7. Doing more tonal corrections
      14m 6s
    8. Calming down highlights
      10m 4s
    9. Vignetting
      8m 58s
    10. The trestle images
      2m 39s
    11. Handling tricky skies
      2m 43s
    12. Doing a selective black-and-white conversion
      2m 23s
    13. Toning
      1m 19s
    14. Split-toning
      2m 19s
    15. High-key and low-key images
      2m 32s
    16. Diffusion
      4m 40s
    17. Using Nik Software's Silver Efex Pro 2 plug-in
      7m 46s
  5. 24m 14s
    1. Selecting a printer
      5m 17s
    2. Preparing the image for print
      8m 30s
    3. Configuring the Print dialog
      5m 9s
    4. Evaluating a print
      5m 18s
  6. 43s
    1. Goodbye
      43s

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Foundations of Photography: Black and White
3h 4m Intermediate Jun 29, 2011

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

In this Foundations of Photography, Ben Long shows photographers how to develop a black and white vocabulary and explains the considerations to take into account when shooting for this medium. The course follows Ben as he goes on location and explains what makes good black and white subject matter and how to visualize the scene in terms of tonal values and contrast rather than color. Along the way, he demonstrates some exposure strategies for getting the best images. Back at the computer, Ben demonstrates techniques for converting the resulting photos into black and white using Photoshop and other imaging tools, and offers tips on printing and output.

Topics include:
  • Why shoot in black and white
  • How to recognize good black-and-white subject matter
  • Preparing the camera
  • Shooting a tone-based subject
  • Exposing for black and white
  • Understanding grayscale
  • Converting from color to black and white using Photoshop CS4 or CS5
  • Converting to black and white in Camera Raw
  • Vignetting
  • Toning and split-toning
  • Comparing high key versus low key images
  • Preparing a black and white image for print
Subjects:
Photography Photography Foundations Black and White
Software:
Photoshop
Author:
Ben Long

How a camera's image sensor captures an image

In the back of your camera, directly behind the lens, is a small computer chip that has an area of light- sensitive material on it. This is the camera's image sensor, and it's what actually captures light and makes an image. It's the digital equivalent of a piece of film, or the back of your eyeball. The surface of the image sensor is divided into a grid, with one cell for each pixel that the sensor can capture. So if you have a 10-megapixel camera, the sensor is divided into a grid of 10 million cells.

Each one of these cells contains a type of metal in it that emits electrons when struck by light. The more light that strikes an area, the more electrons that get emitted. By reading the voltage at each one of these cells, and these cells are called photosites, by reading the voltage, we can find out exactly how much light has struck each pixel. In other words, we can capture an image. Now here is the kicker. There is no color in this image. All that the sensor detects is how much light has struck each pixel.

We know nothing about what color the light was. In other words your camera is inherently a black-and-white device. Now, color is interpolated using something about a hack. Each photosite on the sensor is covered with a different colored filter. Some filters might be red, some might be green, some might be blue; different companies use different colored filters. In this case, there are twice as many green filters as red or blue, because the eye is more sensitive to green than to any other color.

So after the image is exposed, we know how much red filtered light has struck some of the cells, how much blue filtered light has struck others, and so on. We still don't know the exact color of any particular pixel, but we can interpolate the color from these filtered pixels. Here is a very over-simplified version of what I'm talking about. Let's say we're trying to figure out the color of that middle pixel there, which has a green filter on it. We know that it has received a full amount of light, as have all the pixels around it.

And those have various combinations of red and blue filters over them. Because we know that equal amounts of full-strength red, green, and blue make white, the odds are that the center pixel is white. "But," you might be thinking, "what if that's just a single white pixel in the middle of a field of other colors?" Well, the pixels on your image sensor are so tiny that the odds are that there would ever be a single-pixel row or column of colors is just incredibly small. Just to be safe though, there is actually a filter in front of the image sensor which blurs the image a little bit to smear that colors together to ensure that there are no single stray pixels of one odd color.

Now, obviously this whole color-interpolation process is much more complicated than the very simple version that we've seen here, but this should give you an idea of how it works. Now curiously enough, we think of the digital camera as a somewhat recent invention, but all this image sensor technology was invented back in the '60s. And we can thank Einstein for our understanding of metals that emit electrons when they are struck by light. He won the Nobel Prize for his study of the photoelectric effect, which is what that process is called. Your camera might have a black-and- white mode on it, and you might think, "Oh, that probably just reads that luminance information and doesn't bother with the color conversion stuff," but that's actually not how it works.

When you shoot in black-and-white mode, your camera goes ahead and generates a color image, and then it converts that back to black and white. To get the best results from your camera and its sensor, you need to consider some particular camera settings, and that's what we are going to look at in the next chapter.

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