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Combining images for presentation

From: Photoshop CS3 Extended for BioMedical Research

Video: Combining images for presentation

Often, we need to combine images side by side for comparison, control versus positive, a high resolution close up from a larger source image. By combining two images in a single reference, a reader is able to understand the direct comparison and appreciate the differences or lack thereof. If you are following along with me, open up in the Chapter 12 Exercise Files, ORO_Normal and ORO_Plaq. Here we want a comparison of two images, one a normal coronary vessel, the other one demonstrating atherosclerotic plaque. These are two relatively large images, both 5.5 megabytes, and we are going to reduce each of their sizes prior to combining them.

Combining images for presentation

Often, we need to combine images side by side for comparison, control versus positive, a high resolution close up from a larger source image. By combining two images in a single reference, a reader is able to understand the direct comparison and appreciate the differences or lack thereof. If you are following along with me, open up in the Chapter 12 Exercise Files, ORO_Normal and ORO_Plaq. Here we want a comparison of two images, one a normal coronary vessel, the other one demonstrating atherosclerotic plaque. These are two relatively large images, both 5.5 megabytes, and we are going to reduce each of their sizes prior to combining them.

We'll first select the normal image. Go to Image > Image Size and we are going to reduce the Width to 3 centimeters and increase the Resolution at the same time to 300. In shrinking the image, we are reducing its size, but we are also increasing the Resolution slightly, so we'll still have an appropriate fineness of detail for this image. We hit OK and if we double-click on the magnifying glass, we can see this image at 100% by opening up the window.

We are going to do the exact same thing to the plaque that's been stained with Oil Right Out. Go to Image > Image Size, reduce the Width to 3 centimeters, at least double the Resolution to 300, hit OK. We can double-click on the magnifying glass and open that window up and we have our two images we are going to combine. They are both 3 centimeters in Width. By knowing that we can create a new canvas that we can fit both of these on as well as have appropriate spacing between the images.

We will go to File > New. The Resolution is 300, and we are going to make sure we select our Width in centimeters. In this case, we want to have a quarter centimeter between both images as well as on the other side. So we will make sure this is 7 centimeters and then the Height, we also want to make it large enough so that we are not cropping any of the image out. So in this case, if we typed 5, we are good and we will have a white Background.

We can give this a name, ORO Composite and then we hit OK. We would now turn on our Grid; it will help us align everything. And we can use the Move tool to simply drag the image down and over and we can do that for the plaque, we will grab that image, drag it down and over. And now between the Grids and the Smart Guide we can align this, so that they are in perfect relationship to one another. We do need to open up the Layers to be able to pick the separate layers to work with.

Click Layer 1 and we have these both aligned and we have our spacing equal on both the sides and between the two. So now we have our too images if we wanted to we can make them touch, we can put a black line between the two, but in this case we have this position the way we would like. We can get rid of some of the extra white space, by using the Crop tool and we crop away the area that we don't want. We can hit Return, and now we are going to refine this image and reduce its memory usage.

We can see on the bottom so that we can increase its efficiency to about 800 kilobytes from its current size 1.5 megabytes and that can be done by an easy flattening. Now we added the shortcut key, Ctrl+F or Command+F on the Macintosh and now we reduce its size and these are all on a single layer, we can save this as a JPEG, File > Save As, and we are going to go to select the Format to JPEG. We can save this as the largest JPEG file possible, hit OK.

Now we have an image that's ready for presentation on a PowerPoint slide or to share via email. Next, in this video using a single large high resolution image, we are going to create an insert, so that we can see a high resolution picture yet also know its location from a picture of the entire specimen. This is a plant stem and it started out as a 20 megabyte image that was created by a system that composites individual microscope images together. Now let's open up the image we are going to use to build this picture. If you are following along with me, open 20mbstem.tiff. To create the insert we are going to select a portion of this image and keep it at its original size and then we are going to reduce the size of the entire image and then replace that set-aside portion of the image back on to the same picture.

So we use our Square Marquee tool. Now in this case, I want to have a Fixed Ratio of a 4x6. So I type in the Width 6 and I type in Height 4. My ratio will always have at least those dimensions and I am going to copy this area. So I am going to do Ctrl+C or Command+C on the Macintosh. Then Ctrl or Command+N to create a new image, hit OK and then Ctrl or Command+V to place the original resolution fixture into it and on the side.

The next thing I need to do is mark that. This is the area that the image came from. So I will use the Stroke Command, go to Edit > Stroke. It doesn't need to be a very thick border, I will make this three, keep it black and I want this on the outside of the selection. I hit OK, now when I deselect, I have a square that exactly matches where I took the high resolution picture from. Next, I am going to resize this image, go to Image > Image Size, and I want to reduce its size to 10 centimeters and in this case, I can increase the Resolutions, I am not throwing away all of that data, while I resize it and that reduces the size of the image from 21 megabytes, down to three-and-a-half megabytes. I make sure that Bicubic Sharper is selected and that Constrain Proportions is on, so the image is not distorted, hit OK.

Now, I can take the image that I set aside, I can use the Move tool by hitting V and just drag it on top of the other image. In this case, I also want to have a border here. So I will go to Edit > Stroke and I add the same border to the outside, hit OK that strokes the image in Layer 1. The next thing I want to do is add an arrow, I go to my Save tools, pick my Align tool and I want to make sure that I confirm where the arrowhead is going to be placed.

In this case, we are going to put it at the end of the line and we want this to be a filled in arrow, so we make sure we have Fill pixels checked on. We might want to make this arrow a little bit more visible. We double the Weight of the line and now we are going to draw our line from the area that we took the image to the insert. The one last thing is we want to have a border around the entire image. So we select the Background, we double-click to change it to a normal layer, we hit OK.

Then we go to Edit > Stroke, and we can create a nice border. Increase the Thickness to 6 and make sure the location is inside. We hit OK and we have created a border around the entire image. Now we would want to save this as a Photoshop file, in case we want to make any changes later on, File > Save As. Go to Format and select Photoshop, modify its name, hit Save and we are able to go back any time and rework this image.

So that's two possible ways of combining two images. You can build upon this to add many images and create much larger and much more complex composites. In the next video, I will be demonstrating how we can use Bridge to show this work in an automated fashion like the built-in slideshow feature.

Show transcript

This video is part of

Image for Photoshop CS3 Extended for BioMedical Research
Photoshop CS3 Extended for BioMedical Research

80 video lessons · 4772 viewers

Eric Wexler
Author

 
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  1. 7m 59s
    1. Welcome
      2m 39s
    2. Disclaimer
      1m 44s
    3. Exercise files
      46s
    4. Understanding Photoshop CS3 Extended
      1m 42s
    5. Understanding which versions are covered
      1m 8s
  2. 20m 31s
    1. Understanding imaging in biomedical research
      5m 16s
    2. Understanding research image workflows
      4m 6s
    3. Understanding image fundamentals
      3m 29s
    4. Understanding image detection
      7m 40s
  3. 16m 48s
    1. Understanding digital images
      5m 28s
    2. Understanding image file types
      6m 34s
    3. Understanding objective imaging
      4m 46s
  4. 22m 2s
    1. Understanding the default workspace
      4m 0s
    2. Creating a custom workspace
      5m 31s
    3. Working with keyboard commands
      4m 20s
    4. Customizing preferences for research
      3m 51s
    5. Understanding the History Log
      4m 20s
  5. 18m 10s
    1. Learning to always work from a copy
      2m 23s
    2. Opening files in Photoshop
      4m 13s
    3. Introduction to Adobe Bridge 2.0
      2m 25s
    4. Using the Adobe Camera Raw Converter
      3m 34s
    5. Using the DICOM Importation interface
      4m 19s
    6. Working with scanned image sets
      1m 16s
  6. 13m 47s
    1. Organizing images
      5m 0s
    2. Applying rank, keywords, and filters
      6m 9s
    3. Working with image stacks
      2m 38s
  7. 27m 57s
    1. Understanding color modes
      4m 27s
    2. Understanding the Info panel
      7m 49s
    3. Reading the Histogram panel
      5m 49s
    4. Understanding color composition with channels
      6m 10s
    5. Comparing multiple images
      3m 42s
  8. 25m 17s
    1. Resizing images
      5m 1s
    2. Resizing the image canvas
      8m 11s
    3. Joining images with compositing
      7m 9s
    4. Using Auto Align and Auto Blend
      2m 1s
    5. Applying a threshold to an image
      2m 55s
  9. 23m 48s
    1. Considering adjustments
      2m 19s
    2. Understanding exposure controls
      1m 7s
    3. Optimizing exposure with Levels
      5m 1s
    4. Optimizing exposure using Curves
      7m 25s
    5. Removing color casts
      3m 4s
    6. Reducing chromatic aberrations
      4m 52s
  10. 25m 43s
    1. Understanding layers
      4m 21s
    2. Working with adjustment layers
      1m 36s
    3. Using layers to compare histological localization
      4m 42s
    4. Optimizing a fluorescent image
      4m 27s
    5. Creating a false-color image
      4m 25s
    6. Working with Smart Objects
      4m 13s
    7. Using selective desaturation
      1m 59s
  11. 1h 0m
    1. Understanding the Analysis menu
      3m 5s
    2. Creating a calibration
      3m 57s
    3. Selecting data points
      3m 0s
    4. Using the Marquee Selection tool to isolate an area of interest
      4m 19s
    5. Tracing a selection using the Lasso tool
      3m 31s
    6. Using the Polygonal Lasso tool
      6m 48s
    7. Using the Magnetic Lasso to create an area of interest
      4m 1s
    8. Working with the Quick Select tool
      4m 11s
    9. Using the Magic Wand
      4m 11s
    10. Creating a noncontiguous selection using the Magic Wand
      1m 55s
    11. Creating a selection using Color Range
      4m 33s
    12. Using the Selection tools for visual dissection
      2m 30s
    13. Using the Count tool
      5m 59s
    14. Using the ruler tool with calibration
      4m 28s
    15. Extracting data from the Measurement Log
      3m 41s
  12. 26m 32s
    1. Adding Scale bars manually
      4m 18s
    2. Adding Scale bars automatically
      5m 21s
    3. Adding text to images
      4m 50s
    4. Adding arrows to images
      6m 29s
    5. Adding vector shapes to images
      2m 57s
    6. Adding borders to images
      2m 37s
  13. 32m 32s
    1. Creating contact sheets
      4m 9s
    2. Combining images for presentation
      9m 35s
    3. Using the Bridge Slide Show feature
      2m 58s
    4. Creating a representative grayscale image
      6m 30s
    5. Using the Print interface
      2m 47s
    6. Integrating images into Microsoft Office files
      6m 33s
  14. 15m 24s
    1. Optimizing a DICOM image
      3m 50s
    2. Creating a DICOM animation
      7m 2s
    3. Annotating and optimizing animation
      4m 32s
  15. 1m 1s
    1. Goodbye
      1m 1s

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