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7. Undo, History and Revert

From: Photoshop Top 40

Video: 7. Undo, History and Revert

(Music playing) Deke's Photoshop? Deke's Photoshop? Top 40! 7! Feature #7 is the safety net trio of Undo, History and Revert, three functions that will go a long way towards saving your sanity, as has evidently left this gentleman, as photographed by Jerome Dancette. And what we're going to be doing here is we are going to assemble a layered composition and then we're going to pick it apart inside of the History palette, so that you can see how you can undo and redo operations, how you can compare before and after versions of an image, and how you can avoid absolute disasters.

7. Undo, History and Revert

(Music playing) Deke's Photoshop? Deke's Photoshop? Top 40! 7! Feature #7 is the safety net trio of Undo, History and Revert, three functions that will go a long way towards saving your sanity, as has evidently left this gentleman, as photographed by Jerome Dancette. And what we're going to be doing here is we are going to assemble a layered composition and then we're going to pick it apart inside of the History palette, so that you can see how you can undo and redo operations, how you can compare before and after versions of an image, and how you can avoid absolute disasters.

So the first thing I want to do here is that I want to mask this gentleman against a different background. So I am going to switch over to the Paths palette. You may recall how you can draw paths using feature #32, the Pen tool. So I'll go ahead and click on this path outline that I have created in advance. Now that I've loaded that path outline, I am going to switch back over to the Layers palette and I am going to load that path outline as a vector-based mask by dropping down to the bottom of the Layers palette and Ctrl+Clicking or Command+Clicking on this Add Layer Mask icon.

When you Ctrl+Click on the PC or Command+ Click on the Mac on that icon, you load up your path outline as a vector-based mask. And that way, you still have access to the original anchor points and control handles and so on. So that's step number one here. Step number two, I am going to go ahead and turn on this earth layer. Let's go ahead and zoom out so that we can take it in a little bit better here. And this image comes to us from Paul Paladin once again of the Fotolia Image Library. Now, at this point, we don't have a good match between the earth layer in the background and the scary mutant in the foreground.

So I'm to add a couple of layer effects. You may recall feature #17 layer effects here inside Photoshop. I am going to click on the fx icon, and I am going choose Gradient Overlay in order to load up the Gradient Overlay dialog box. By default you get a vertical black-to-white gradient. That's pretty much fine. I just need to make a couple of adjustments. First of all, I'm going to angle this gradient to 110 degrees, then I am going to move my cursor outside the dialog box, and drag the gradient down a little bit like so.

So you can drag the gradient directly inside the image window, and then I am going to switch feature #11, the blend mode from Normal to Multiply, like so, and we multiply the bottom and that permits us to go ahead and burn in the bottom of the earth there. Now, I'll go ahead and switchover to Color Overlay in order to add a shellacking of red to this layer. And I want to change that color of course. So I'll click on that color swatch. I'll move my cursor out into the Image Window and it changes to feature #8, the Eyedropper.

Then I'll click some place. Let's say inside of the ear associated with his creature. I want to go ahead and raise the Saturation value a little bit and I'm going to increase the brightness value as well, so that we have this delicious shade of chartreuse here. I'll click OK, and I am going to change the blend mode from normal to overlay in order to achieve this effect right there. We can go ahead and back off the opacity value little bit as well if we wanted to, or what might be better actually is if I clicked on this color swatch again, and raised the Brightness value even further, because I want to restore some of that bright light in the background in the earth layer there. All right.

So this might work out pretty well. I am going to click OK in order to accept that modification. Click OK once again in order to apply those two layer effects to the earth layer. All right the next thing that we need to do is wrap some leopard skin around this guy's face. I know that doesn't seem like something we absolutely need to do, but it's going to work out really nicely. I am going to turn on this leopard layer and click on it in order to select it. This image comes to us from Vladimir Sazonov, once again of the Fotolia Image Library. And I am going to change the blend mode this time around to Overlay in order to map that leopard skin onto this guy's face.

Now we are covering up everything as you can see. We are covering up both his face and the background. Even though, just look at the detail inside this leopard skin, you can still see the guy face, everything works out really nicely. But I don't want to cover up the background earth. So I am going to go up to the Layer menu and I am going to choose Create Clipping Mask in order to mask this leopard skin into the guy's face. The next thing I need do is carve away the eyes. The eyes should not be covered in fur. So I am going to switch over to the Channels palette and notice that I have created in advance a feature # 15 alpha channel called eyeholes.

I am going to go ahead and load it up by pressing the Ctrl key and clicking on that channel. That would be a Command+Click on the Mac. Now, I am going to switch back to RGB switchover to the layers palette and drop down to the bottom of the palette and click on the Add Layer Mask icon. Now problem at this point is that this mask is too sharply defined. So we should have a little blur around these eyes. And I'm going to applying the blur to the selected layer mask using feature #14 Filter, Blur, Gaussian blur.

And I will apply a Radius value of two pixels. That's going to work out just fine, click OK. Now, we've got a little overboard at this point with this leopard skin. I want back it off a little bit. I am going to do that in two different ways. First of all, I am going to click on the leopard skin thumbnail right there, so the layer is selected as opposed to the mask. And I am going to apply feature #9 Levels. So I'll go up to the Image menu, choose Adjustments and choose the Levels command. And I am going to go ahead and select this first Output Levels value and raise it to 60.

That way I am saying what was formerly black will now be a luminance level of 60, which is something of a dark gray. We're going to lose our shadows inside the leopard layer. We are going back off of the dark stuff so that we are not over-darkening this mutant. Then I'll click okay in order to accept that modification. The next thing that I want to do is to reveal the Shadows and Highlights, some of the Shadows and Highlights in the underlying mutant man layer, and I am going to do that using feature #19. It as if there's nothing we haven't covered so far, feature #19 Luminance Blending.

So I'll double-click on the layer to bring up the Layer Style dialog box and I am going press the Alt key or the Option key on the Mac, and I am going to drag away the right side of this black triangle, until I get a value of 80 and then with the Alt key or Option key still down, I'm going to drag away the left side of the white triangle until we get a value of 160. So this way I'm saying any thing with a Luminance level of 80 to 160 inside the leopard layer will be opaque subject to the Overlay blend mode, anything else will be fading away to transparency.

Click OK to accept that modification. One more thing I want to do I want to darken the back of this guy's neck using an inner shadow. So I am going to click on the mutant man layer. I am going to click on fx, go to Inner Shadow like so. The Angle value is already set to 0 degrees, so that suits me just fine. I am going to increase the opacity value to 100%. I am going to increase this Distance value to 35 pixels, tab down to the Size value and increase it to 100 pixels like so, and then click OK in order to accept that modification.

Now, you can see that this guy is looking pretty darn good, dare I say somewhat realistic against this greenish world background. After all he lives in some kind of tube of green goo as only befits a mutant. But so far we haven't got around to looking at Undo, History or Revert. So let's check it out. If you go up to the Edit menu, you can choose the Undo, but that's a one level Undo command. If I press Ctrl+Z or Command+Z or choose this command, it will immediately switch over to a Redo command.

If what you really want to do is take advantage of multiple undos, then you should drop down to this guy, Step Backward, which is Ctrl+Alt+Z or Command+Option+Z on the Mac. That goes ahead and undoes the Drop Shadow. Then if you want to step forward again, you would go up to the Edit menu and choose Step Forward, Ctrl+Shift+Z or Command+Shift+Z on the Mac. Now, an even better way to work, in my opinion, is to go ahead and switch over to the History palette. Let me show you how that works. If you go up to the Window menu and choose History, then you'll bring up the History palette, which includes all of your operation so far.

These are all the significant operations. That is the pixel changing or layer changing operations. And each one of those operations is saved as a state. So for example, let's say you wanted to see the very dark version of that leopard image mapped onto the mutant's face. You would click on Gaussian Blur here to go back three states, three operations, and you would see what the very dark version of the fur looked like. Then if you wanted to see the after version, what it looks like now, you could click on Inner Shadow or even better you can just press Ctrl+Z, Command+Z on the Mac.

So do you see how that works? Because Undo is separate from History, you can actually undo and redo History. So now I'll go ahead and hide the History palette so we can see what we're doing here. If I press Ctrl+Z or Command+Z on the Mac, I go back to the previous version of the image, the previous Gaussian blur state. And then if I press Ctrl+Z or Command+Z again, then I redo all those operations and see what the after version of the image looks like. It's a very, very valuable tool.

But it gets even better than that. Now let's say I want to compare this version of the image to the version of the image that's saved on disk. I could go up to the File menu and I could choose the Revert command, which even has a keyboard shortcut of F12, which some people would argue is very dangerous to have a keyboard shortcut for the Revert command. Because after all, if you choose to Revert, then you abandon all of your changes. And what's even more dangerous is that Photoshop didn't warn us about that. It just went ahead and threw away all our changes, and loaded up the saved version of the image.

Well it did that because your changes are still there. If you go over to the History palette, you'll see that Revert is just another state. And if you want to get rid of it, you just click on the Inner Shadow or you can undo it. You could press Ctrl+Z, Command+Z on the Mac to undo the revert. Ctrl+Z, Command+Z on the Mac to redo the Revert. So it's totally up to you. All right, I'm going to go back to our version of the image so far. Let me show you the ultra coolest best thing about undoing at Photoshop, one day you are going to really thank me.

I won't be there for it. But you are going to be thanking me under your breath because it's going to save your life. Let's say you decide to make some destructive modifications to your image. You decide to grab good old feature #31, the Brush tool. So' I'll go in and click on tool in order to select it, and then I am going to press the Alt key or the Option key on the Mac in order to access feature #8, the Eyedropper, and I'm going to click on sort of lightish shade of green inside of this fellow's skin.

And now, I am going to paint directly onto the mutant, using the Multiply blend mode. So I'll go ahead and choose Multiply and then I'll give him a mustache for example. So I'll paint in this light mustache here. We might want it to be darker than that. So I'll go ahead and Alt+Click or Option+Click on a slightly darker color. This looks much better here. And then you decide to paint sort of an eye of Horus around it. That's sort of a bit of Cleopatra make up around his eyes and around the other eye too. That'll look pretty good. And then maybe paint in some clown makeup let's say.

Some stuff up here as well too. So I've applied several different brushstrokes at this point. If I bring up the History palette, you can see that there are many different Brush tool states now. And then I go ahead and switch over to the Marquee tool, let's say, and I draw a selection outline like so. And then I think well, I don't really want that selection outline. So I'll press Ctrl+D or Command+D on the Mac to deselect. But my finger slips at the last second and I accidentally press Ctrl+S or Command+S on the Mac and I see that little spinning ball for a moment I go holy smokes! What happened? Because I still have a selection.

Did I just save over my original? And you go up to the File menu, and sure enough the save command is dimmed, which means I just blew it. I just saved over the original image. Now once upon a time, you would have been doomed. That would be game over. You'd have to go back and relocate the original version of this image. But thanks to History. Go over to the History palette. You see the very first state, the one with the thumbnail. Click on it that's the Open version of the image. Photoshop automatically does that for you. Now go to the File menu, choose the Save command. All better.

Big huge sigh of relief and your operations are still there waiting for you. Go ahead and click on Brush tool and you've got all this ridiculous stuff back again. And that, my friends, is the deep sigh of relief that is feature #7, Undo, History and Revert here inside Photoshop.

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Photoshop Top 40

41 video lessons · 37777 viewers

Deke McClelland
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