New Feature: Playlist Center! Pick a topic and let our playlists guide the way.

Start learning with our library of video tutorials taught by experts. Get started

Matting, Framing, and Hanging Your Photographs
Illustration by

Understanding the kinds of glazing


From:

Matting, Framing, and Hanging Your Photographs

with Konrad Eek

Video: Understanding the kinds of glazing

So once you have made a decision on what type of frame you want to use your next choice involves what type of glazing you want to use. Glazing is a term we refer to, used to refer to whatever the first transparent barrier is in front of your work. Placed there to protect it from spills, windborne debris, or whatever. Two basic types are available either acrylic or glass. And there are advantages and disadvantages to both. I typically use acrylic in settings that are commercial in nature. And the advantage of acrylic is it's virtually unbreakable if somebody is in the lobby and bumps in to it, it's not going to cause any damage if it gets knocked off the wall, it typically will not break, where, of course, glass will shatter.
Expand all | Collapse all
  1. 5m 59s
    1. Welcome
      1m 46s
    2. Using this course
      1m 19s
    3. Understanding why we frame
      2m 54s
  2. 25m 31s
    1. Visiting a professional framing studio
      6m 22s
    2. Working with a framer's vocabulary
      4m 16s
    3. Conversing with a framer
      14m 53s
  3. 50m 36s
    1. Selecting a mat
      5m 13s
    2. Deciding on the window size
      9m 27s
    3. Understanding standard vs. custom mats
      1m 46s
    4. Using a handheld mat cutter
      4m 11s
    5. Using a production mat cutter
      8m 37s
    6. Assembling the mat
      2m 5s
    7. Mounting art in a mat
      3m 25s
    8. Mounting the art with photo corners
      4m 51s
    9. Mounting the art with repositionable mounting adhesive (RPMA)
      6m 52s
    10. Exploring troubleshooting techniques
      4m 9s
  4. 32m 11s
    1. Selecting a frame
      5m 15s
    2. Understanding the kinds of glazing
      4m 14s
    3. Cutting glass
      7m 15s
    4. Scoring acrylic
      3m 52s
    5. Sawing acrylic
      4m 42s
    6. Keeping the glass clean
      6m 53s
  5. 46m 10s
    1. Assembling an easel back frame
      6m 21s
    2. Assembling a metal frame
      8m 33s
    3. Using a V-nailer to assemble a chopped frame
      7m 49s
    4. Putting the frame, glazing, mat, and art together
      12m 4s
    5. Using a band clamp for assembly
      6m 10s
    6. Reviewing alternative hanging devices
      5m 13s
  6. 13m 21s
    1. Prepping the show
      2m 26s
    2. Using a wall as a canvas
      6m 46s
    3. Hanging the show
      4m 9s
  7. 36m 2s
    1. Introduction to hanging tools
      8m 2s
    2. Using lasers for precision
      3m 18s
    3. Hanging on plaster and lath
      6m 42s
    4. Hanging on either drywall or panelling
      6m 56s
    5. Hanging on brick, stone, or steel
      7m 35s
    6. Lighting your work
      3m 29s
  8. 54s
    1. Goodbye
      54s

Watch this entire course now—plus get access to every course in the library. Each course includes high-quality videos taught by expert instructors.

Become a member
please wait ...
Matting, Framing, and Hanging Your Photographs
3h 30m Beginner Sep 20, 2012

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

Matting and framing is relatively simple, and doing it yourself costs less and is more rewarding than using a framing service. In this course, photographer and professional framer Konrad Eek describes the tools, techniques, and creative decisions involved in matting, framing, and hanging photographs.

The course begins with an overview of framing concepts, terms, and tools and then shows how to choose and work with the various components of a framed print: matboard, frame, glazing, wire hangers, and more. The course also examines the issues and creative options behind hanging an exhibit, whether in a gallery or in a home.

Topics include:
  • Conversing with a framer
  • Selecting a mat and a frame
  • Deciding on window size
  • Using a handheld or production mat cutter
  • Mounting art
  • Cutting glass
  • Assembling frames
  • Hanging photographs in groups
  • Hanging photographs on different surfaces
Subjects:
Photography Printing Photos
Author:
Konrad Eek

Understanding the kinds of glazing

So once you have made a decision on what type of frame you want to use your next choice involves what type of glazing you want to use. Glazing is a term we refer to, used to refer to whatever the first transparent barrier is in front of your work. Placed there to protect it from spills, windborne debris, or whatever. Two basic types are available either acrylic or glass. And there are advantages and disadvantages to both. I typically use acrylic in settings that are commercial in nature. And the advantage of acrylic is it's virtually unbreakable if somebody is in the lobby and bumps in to it, it's not going to cause any damage if it gets knocked off the wall, it typically will not break, where, of course, glass will shatter.

The disadvantage of acrylic is it is prone to being scratched. It has a fairly hard surface, but over time it can pick up scratches particularly in a high traffic commercial application. Acrylic is also a little bit more expensive than glass, both the acrylic and glass surfaces come with a variety of different treatments that afford different kinds of protection just got one piece of acrylic here, that's just regular clear acrylic, you can also get acrylic that has UV protection, you want UV protection, if you're hanging your work in an area where it gets direct sunlight.

The UV protection will help to prevent your work from fading so you need to kind analyze where the work is going to hang. If you're not sure I tend to err on the side of protecting it rather than not. So acrylic also comes in a variety of thicknesses, typically the larger the surface area the thicker you want the acrylic to be. One other advantage of acrylic as compared to glass is it's also lighter in weight, so when you get to very large frame pieces, sometimes if weight is a consideration, you might want to opt for acrylic.

If you're going to go with glass, glass comes packaged by the box as opposed to acrylic which comes by the sheet and typically acrylic, if you buy it from a wholesale source will come in 4x8 foot sheets. Advantage of buying an larger sheets is the price drop is substantial. If you buy thick glass or acrylic cut to size, you're going to pay almost three times as much for it as you would if you bought a wholesale. This is why after we go through this here we're going to talk about different ways to cut it, because the savings are substantial, if you learn to cut your own.

On the 4x8 foot sheets of acrylic however, those are really hard to handle as an individual, so I typically will have my wholesaler cut them either to size, or to smaller sizes, still I'm getting a big savings in that regard. Glass, I'm going to show you couple of the different variety of glass that are available. I can say that comes packed in boxes from most framing things I just use premium, clear glass, but I talked about UV protection conservation glass.

Typically will provide about 97% UV protection, and you can see that there is no evidence of any kind of coding on this, it's still remarkably clear, you can also get conservation glass with a reflection control coating. What reflection control does is it helps eliminate the reflection of lights in the room, the reflection of even you the observer. Disadvantage of reflection control is you can see here it has kind of a milky look to it, and when my hand gets very close to it it's pretty clear, but if you have your work recessed, and if you're floating it further behind the glazing layer, this kind of reflection control is not a very good choice, which leads us to the best glass that's out there is museum glass which has a transparent reflection control coating, you can see here, there is no milkiness to my hand, has 97% UV protection as well.

Disadvantage of museum glass of course is the expense. Museum class typically will cost four to five times as much as plain glazing. So now that we exposed you to some of the different types of glazing you can use. In the next couple movies, we're going to talk about techniques for cutting the glazing to the proper size for your frame.

There are currently no FAQs about Matting, Framing, and Hanging Your Photographs.

 
Share a link to this course

What are exercise files?

Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course. Save time by downloading the author's files instead of setting up your own files, and learn by following along with the instructor.

Can I take this course without the exercise files?

Yes! If you decide you would like the exercise files later, you can upgrade to a premium account any time.

Become a member Download sample files See plans and pricing

Please wait... please wait ...
Upgrade to get access to exercise files.

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Learn by watching, listening, and doing, Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along Premium memberships include access to all exercise files in the library.
Upgrade now


Exercise files

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

For additional information on downloading and using exercise files, watch our instructional video or read the instructions in the FAQ.

This course includes free exercise files, so you can practice while you watch the course. To access all the exercise files in our library, become a Premium Member.

join now Upgrade now

Are you sure you want to mark all the videos in this course as unwatched?

This will not affect your course history, your reports, or your certificates of completion for this course.


Mark all as unwatched Cancel

Congratulations

You have completed Matting, Framing, and Hanging Your Photographs.

Return to your organization's learning portal to continue training, or close this page.


OK
Become a member to add this course to a playlist

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses—and create as many playlists as you like.

Get started

Already a member?

Become a member to like this course.

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses.

Get started

Already a member?

Exercise files

Learn by watching, listening, and doing! Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along. Exercise files are available with all Premium memberships. Learn more

Get started

Already a Premium member?

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Ask a question

Thanks for contacting us.
You’ll hear from our Customer Service team within 24 hours.

Please enter the text shown below:

The classic layout automatically defaults to the latest Flash Player.

To choose a different player, hold the cursor over your name at the top right of any lynda.com page and choose Site preferencesfrom the dropdown menu.

Continue to classic layout Stay on new layout
Exercise files

Access exercise files from a button right under the course name.

Mark videos as unwatched

Remove icons showing you already watched videos if you want to start over.

Control your viewing experience

Make the video wide, narrow, full-screen, or pop the player out of the page into its own window.

Interactive transcripts

Click on text in the transcript to jump to that spot in the video. As the video plays, the relevant spot in the transcript will be highlighted.

Are you sure you want to delete this note?

No

Notes cannot be added for locked videos.

Thanks for signing up.

We’ll send you a confirmation email shortly.


Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

Keep up with news, tips, and latest courses with emails from lynda.com.

Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

   
submit Lightbox submit clicked
Terms and conditions of use

We've updated our terms and conditions (now called terms of service).Go
Review and accept our updated terms of service.