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Matting, Framing, and Hanging Your Photographs

Selecting a frame


From:

Matting, Framing, and Hanging Your Photographs

with Konrad Eek

Video: Selecting a frame

We have made it back from Quartz Mountain to my shop here in Norman. I work out of my home and have done an extensive remodel in order to be able to accomplish the tasks of the framing business. One souvenir I did bring back from Quartz Mountain is a little bit of a sore throat. So bear with me if my voice comes and goes while we do the next few movies. I want to talk to you about the options that are available to you when you start to select a frame. I think everybody has picked an easel backed frame, those are the ones that you line up on your mantle piece, or table top, typically showing family portraits.
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  1. 5m 59s
    1. Welcome
      1m 46s
    2. Using this course
      1m 19s
    3. Understanding why we frame
      2m 54s
  2. 25m 31s
    1. Visiting a professional framing studio
      6m 22s
    2. Working with a framer's vocabulary
      4m 16s
    3. Conversing with a framer
      14m 53s
  3. 50m 36s
    1. Selecting a mat
      5m 13s
    2. Deciding on the window size
      9m 27s
    3. Understanding standard vs. custom mats
      1m 46s
    4. Using a handheld mat cutter
      4m 11s
    5. Using a production mat cutter
      8m 37s
    6. Assembling the mat
      2m 5s
    7. Mounting art in a mat
      3m 25s
    8. Mounting the art with photo corners
      4m 51s
    9. Mounting the art with repositionable mounting adhesive (RPMA)
      6m 52s
    10. Exploring troubleshooting techniques
      4m 9s
  4. 32m 11s
    1. Selecting a frame
      5m 15s
    2. Understanding the kinds of glazing
      4m 14s
    3. Cutting glass
      7m 15s
    4. Scoring acrylic
      3m 52s
    5. Sawing acrylic
      4m 42s
    6. Keeping the glass clean
      6m 53s
  5. 46m 10s
    1. Assembling an easel back frame
      6m 21s
    2. Assembling a metal frame
      8m 33s
    3. Using a V-nailer to assemble a chopped frame
      7m 49s
    4. Putting the frame, glazing, mat, and art together
      12m 4s
    5. Using a band clamp for assembly
      6m 10s
    6. Reviewing alternative hanging devices
      5m 13s
  6. 13m 21s
    1. Prepping the show
      2m 26s
    2. Using a wall as a canvas
      6m 46s
    3. Hanging the show
      4m 9s
  7. 36m 2s
    1. Introduction to hanging tools
      8m 2s
    2. Using lasers for precision
      3m 18s
    3. Hanging on plaster and lath
      6m 42s
    4. Hanging on either drywall or panelling
      6m 56s
    5. Hanging on brick, stone, or steel
      7m 35s
    6. Lighting your work
      3m 29s
  8. 54s
    1. Goodbye
      54s

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Matting, Framing, and Hanging Your Photographs
3h 30m Beginner Sep 20, 2012

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

Matting and framing is relatively simple, and doing it yourself costs less and is more rewarding than using a framing service. In this course, photographer and professional framer Konrad Eek describes the tools, techniques, and creative decisions involved in matting, framing, and hanging photographs.

The course begins with an overview of framing concepts, terms, and tools and then shows how to choose and work with the various components of a framed print: matboard, frame, glazing, wire hangers, and more. The course also examines the issues and creative options behind hanging an exhibit, whether in a gallery or in a home.

Topics include:
  • Conversing with a framer
  • Selecting a mat and a frame
  • Deciding on window size
  • Using a handheld or production mat cutter
  • Mounting art
  • Cutting glass
  • Assembling frames
  • Hanging photographs in groups
  • Hanging photographs on different surfaces
Subjects:
Photography Printing Photos
Author:
Konrad Eek

Selecting a frame

We have made it back from Quartz Mountain to my shop here in Norman. I work out of my home and have done an extensive remodel in order to be able to accomplish the tasks of the framing business. One souvenir I did bring back from Quartz Mountain is a little bit of a sore throat. So bear with me if my voice comes and goes while we do the next few movies. I want to talk to you about the options that are available to you when you start to select a frame. I think everybody has picked an easel backed frame, those are the ones that you line up on your mantle piece, or table top, typically showing family portraits.

We have got a few examples here that come in varying sizes from typical 4x6, 5x7, I think we have a 8x10 one over here. They generally function with a series of latching mechanisms that will hold a hinged back in place or removable back in place, and you just insert the art in the back, and we'll go over some important techniques to do that properly in a little bit. One thing I suggest you look forward in easel backs, notice there is a strap here that connects the stand to the frame itself that's real important over time, because most of the backs on those are just a heavyweight cardboard, and if you have an easel back frame like this without that reinforcing strap, over time, this cardboard will start to band and the frame will eventually get closer and closer to flyout, so look for that strap when you're picking an easel back.

The next step is in simplicity is a sectional frame, and we have here a metal section, you buy these in pairs of legs and so truly you can customize your size to almost any size as long as it's in whole inches and see here the components we have here for 11x14 frame, and when you buy the two pairs of legs, you'll also get a hardware kit that has all the parts necessary to assemble the frame. Once again, we'll go over this in depth in a later movie.

Beyond the sectional frame you can also buy what's called open back frames. These come in a variety of standard sizes and many different styles, there are great choice price wise that are typically more economical than having a custom frame made. Disadvantage of them is typically you'll only find them in the standard frame sizes, but they are fairly simple proposition to put together. If you look at the back here you can see that the recess here, the hole where your art package goes this offset we call a rabbit, and this overhang in the front of the frame is what actually holds the work in place, so you drop your glass and mat package in there and then use framers points from the back to apply pressure to hold in place.

Once again we'll go over that in detail, that's an open back frame. This is actually a back quite like an easel back frame, but it's not an easel back. Oval frames are an interesting choice for portraits, typically the oval shape is a nice highlight for the shape of the face. They also fit well too in different core themes, typically oval frames would fit in a more traditional theme than a more contemporary.

And lastly, when you're buying custom frames, you can buy either length, or you buy whole sticks of the molding, typically those sticks run from eight to ten feet in length, or you can buy chopped molding, and I typically buy chop. A couple of reasons for that if you buy length you have to contend with the scrap, you typically have to keep more of an inventory, so it ties up a lot of space with my studio setup the way it is I don't really have the storage to deal with length. The other advantage of buying chop if you look at this piece here, the chop comes like the sectional frames where you buy pairs of legs and they are cut in to size, the advantage of chop is you don't have to deal with whole inches, you can get them cut to any size, and you can see here how clean the cut is on the edge.

This is if actually a burl surface, it's a real nice hardwood veneer and they have, the wholesaler that I buy from, they use this saw that cost about $10,000 to make this cut, and you can see it's just beautifully smooth. There's no nicks in the veneer, which makes assembly really easy. I do have a miter saw here, and I occasionally do chops myself, but because my saw is not of the quality that my wholesaler has, I typically have to saw then sand to get this kind of an edge.

So this is a real timesaver and very affordable way, you can also buy chopped and joined molding where they'll cut it and put it together for you as well. One of the things that comes up with buying either chop or sectionals or open back frames is typically they come without the glazing. And when I say glazing I'm referring to either the acrylic or glass that is your first barrier of protection in front of the work. When you buy an easel back frame, you don't need to worry about glazing because typically the easel back frames will come with either glass or acrylic already in place.

So what I want to talk to you about now is the choices that you have when you look at glazing materials.

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