Narrative Portraiture: On Location in New York City
Illustration by John Hersey

Narrative Portraiture: On Location in New York City

with Chris Orwig

Video: Further inspiration

As we're approaching the close of this installment I thought it would be worthwhile to take a few minutes to share with you some places that you can go, some photographers that you can look at for further inspiration. Now you may remember one of those introductory movies when I said one of our goals in going to New York is to be inspired by this location, to become familiar with New York, to learn from New York. Another goal was to figure out how can we create portraits within this context. Well, moving from that how then can we gain some inspiration from New York, and from creating portraits here? One of things that I think that we can do, is we can look to other great photographers that were either born or raised or had their studios in New York.

Start your free trial now, and begin learning software, business and creative skills—anytime, anywhere—with video instruction from recognized industry experts.

Start Your Free Trial Now
please wait ...
Watch the Online Video Course Narrative Portraiture: On Location in New York City
1h 30m Appropriate for all May 27, 2011

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

In the Narrative Portraiture series, photographer and teacher Chris Orwig explores the use of elements such as location and natural light to create images that tell stories about their subjects and produce a strong emotional connection.

In this installment of the series, Chris shows how to incorporate aspects of a location, such as architecture, natural light, and even passersby, to create authentic, story-filled portraits.

The course begins with a photo shoot on the Brooklyn Bridge. Chris emphasizes the importance of directing and collaborating with a subject and of being responsive to changing lighting and location conditions. After the shoot, Chris discusses the preparation that goes into on-location shoots, from choosing camera gear to storyboarding. Next, he reviews the images from the shoot and mentions the post-processing techniques that he employed to make them more effective. The course also includes several assignments aimed at reinforcing the concepts Chris describes.

The course concludes with an on-location family portrait shoot and a look at the special considerations that go into group shots.

Topics include:
  • Engaging the subject
  • Scouting a location
  • Handling gear on location
  • Taking advantage of natural light
  • Planning and storyboarding before a shoot
  • Working with props and groups
Subject:
Photography
Author:
Chris Orwig

Further inspiration

As we're approaching the close of this installment I thought it would be worthwhile to take a few minutes to share with you some places that you can go, some photographers that you can look at for further inspiration. Now you may remember one of those introductory movies when I said one of our goals in going to New York is to be inspired by this location, to become familiar with New York, to learn from New York. Another goal was to figure out how can we create portraits within this context. Well, moving from that how then can we gain some inspiration from New York, and from creating portraits here? One of things that I think that we can do, is we can look to other great photographers that were either born or raised or had their studios in New York.

For example, Richard Avedon. Richard Avedon is a fascinating photographer. He has a number of great books out. And his photography is really strong. And so often we look at photographs from guys like this online and what's happens is when you look at a photograph online, typically you're multitasking. You're checking your e-mail doing something else, clicking through a few photos. You are not really letting them sync in. I've a friend who is a film director and I asked him, hey, so what do you do in the evenings? And he said, well, right now what I'm doing is I'm sitting down each night with one of Richard Avedon's books, this one in particular.

And I'm just looking at it for few hours. He's spending time getting to know the photographs, almost living with those images, and I think something unique happens when we look at a book. Online, again it's click this, scroll here, do that, multitask. A book, we sit down, maybe with a cup of coffee, we pause, and we can slowly flip through the pages and there's a linear order,. There's a beginning, a middle, and end.

The images connect one to another. We can see a photographer's vision in a unique and distinct way and that is one of the reasons why I just love photo books. And who also can we learn from the New York? What about Alfred Stieglitz? So many people refer to him as the Beethoven of photographers, because he has so much intensity in his images and there are so many others as well. I'll mention a few more names. Irving Penn. Throughout his life he created a really strong body of work and some of his portraits are among my favorite.

And then there's Elliott Erwitt. Then that guy tells stories with his pictures. Some of his photographs have literally caused me to laugh out loud. He has a really fun and quirky and interesting perspective. Then there are other photographers, like Edward Steichen. Well, of course, we have to mention, Annie Leibovitz, one of the greatest portrait photographers of all time, and of our time. Now there are many more New York photographers, which are great. I'm just sharing with you or giving you a few names, and there's a reason why I'm doing that.

It's easy to be overwhelmed by great photography. Sometimes we look at these lists. We look at all this photography and we're immobilized. So what I'm suggesting here isn't that you look at everything, you dig into everything that's New York. Rather, you pick maybe, one name, one person, one photographer, and get to know their work and get to know it well.

There are currently no FAQs about Narrative Portraiture: On Location in New York City.

 
Share a link to this course

What are exercise files?

Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course. Save time by downloading the author's files instead of setting up your own files, and learn by following along with the instructor.

Can I take this course without the exercise files?

Yes! If you decide you would like the exercise files later, you can upgrade to a premium account any time.

Become a member Download sample files See plans and pricing

Please wait... please wait ...
Upgrade to get access to exercise files.

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Learn by watching, listening, and doing, Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along Premium memberships include access to all exercise files in the library.


Exercise files

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

For additional information on downloading and using exercise files, watch our instructional video or read the instructions in the FAQ .

This course includes free exercise files, so you can practice while you watch the course. To access all the exercise files in our library, become a Premium Member.

* Estimated file size

Are you sure you want to mark all the videos in this course as unwatched?

This will not affect your course history, your reports, or your certificates of completion for this course.


Mark all as unwatched Cancel

Congratulations

You have completed Narrative Portraiture: On Location in New York City.

Return to your organization's learning portal to continue training, or close this page.


OK
Become a member to add this course to a playlist

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses—and create as many playlists as you like.

Get started

Already a member ?

Exercise files

Learn by watching, listening, and doing! Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along. Exercise files are available with all Premium memberships. Learn more

Get started

Already a Premium member?

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Ask a question

Thanks for contacting us.
You’ll hear from our Customer Service team within 24 hours.

Please enter the text shown below:

The classic layout automatically defaults to the latest Flash Player.

To choose a different player, hold the cursor over your name at the top right of any lynda.com page and choose Site preferences from the dropdown menu.

Continue to classic layout Stay on new layout
Exercise files

Access exercise files from a button right under the course name.

Mark videos as unwatched

Remove icons showing you already watched videos if you want to start over.

Control your viewing experience

Make the video wide, narrow, full-screen, or pop the player out of the page into its own window.

Interactive transcripts

Click on text in the transcript to jump to that spot in the video. As the video plays, the relevant spot in the transcript will be highlighted.

Learn more, save more. Upgrade today!

Get our Annual Premium Membership at our best savings yet.

Upgrade to our Annual Premium Membership today and get even more value from your lynda.com subscription:

“In a way, I feel like you are rooting for me. Like you are really invested in my experience, and want me to get as much out of these courses as possible this is the best place to start on your journey to learning new material.”— Nadine H.

Thanks for signing up.

We’ll send you a confirmation email shortly.


Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

Keep up with news, tips, and latest courses with emails from lynda.com.

Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

   
submit Lightbox submit clicked
Terms and conditions of use

We've updated our terms and conditions (now called terms of service).Go
Review and accept our updated terms of service.