New Feature: Playlist Center! Pick a topic and let our playlists guide the way.

Start learning with our library of video tutorials taught by experts. Get started

The Elements of Effective Photographs
Illustration by

Techniques for panning


From:

The Elements of Effective Photographs

with Natalie Fobes

Video: Techniques for panning

There are times that you want to stop action and yet still convey motion, so the answer for you is to pan. A pan is simply to follow the action with your camera at a slow shutter speed. There are lots of ways to mess up a pan, and believe me, I haven't done them all. But with a few tips it will help bring up your percentage of success, with this technique. So the first thing that we are going to do is look for a background that has a nice texture to it or gradations of black and white or great color.

Watch this entire course now—plus get access to every course in the library. Each course includes high-quality videos taught by expert instructors.

Become a member
please wait ...
The Elements of Effective Photographs
1h 36m Beginner Aug 30, 2011

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

In this course, Pulitzer-nominated photographer Natalie Fobes takes viewers into the studio and on location to explore the many elements that combine to make an effective photo.

The course explores compositional elements that guide a viewer's eye, including the rule of thirds; leading lines, patterns, and curves; and depth of field. Natalie then details the roles of color and light in a photo. She shows how to work with the natural light in a room or outdoor location, and how to enhance it using reflectors, newspapers, a T-shirt, or whatever might be handy. She also shows some simple indoor lighting setups that can replicate the look of natural light.

The course continues with a look at movement and how a photographer can convey a sense of motion by blurring part of the image or freezing a fast-moving subject. Next, Natalie explores the concepts of peak action and the decisive moment—those split seconds that capture the essence or emotion of a subject or scene. The course wraps up with a discussion of the roles of planning and research in creating effective photos.

Subjects:
Photography Photography Foundations
Author:
Natalie Fobes

Techniques for panning

There are times that you want to stop action and yet still convey motion, so the answer for you is to pan. A pan is simply to follow the action with your camera at a slow shutter speed. There are lots of ways to mess up a pan, and believe me, I haven't done them all. But with a few tips it will help bring up your percentage of success, with this technique. So the first thing that we are going to do is look for a background that has a nice texture to it or gradations of black and white or great color.

That will really add interest to your background. The next thing is to figure out how fast the subject is actually going and adjust your shutter speed accordingly. I like to use between the 1/15th and 1/60th of a second for my shutter speeds when I'm doing a pan. And then the next thing to do is to figure out your focus situation. Now I've found that using a servo, the automatic focus in servo mode, is really all I need to do, and that is always recalculating the focus as we go along.

And then the final tip, and probably the most important tip that I can give you, is to think about where the action is going to start and where the action is going to end. Take your feet and point it at where you think the action is going to end, and then you can curve your body around and look at where the action is going to start. As these runners go by us, I will be very smoothly photographing as my body naturally unwinds.

Okay, so let's try it out. I'm shooting at 1/60th of a second, and I am at an ISO of 100. I am on shutter priority, and I think we are ready to go. Are you guys ready? All right, let's do it. Great! Now did you see how smooth that was, to just follow them as they came by me? It works really well.

Oh yeah, okay, so I'm seeing some of the pans in there. I am seeing some of the streaks from the background. But I think that we can try it a little bit slower. I am going to move my camera back down to 1/30th of a second and see what we can get from that. Okay, gentlemen, are you ready? Okay. Oh yeah. Okay, that's working. The streaks from the bleachers are really cool.

They are really nice and long, and yet I still have the action stopped on one of the runners. This is going to be fun. I think I am going to take it down to 1/15th of a second and just see what that will do. All right, are you ready to roll? Okay, yeah, I think maybe the 15th of a second was a little bit slow for the message that I'm trying to send.

It certainly was artistic, but there was nothing in focus. I'm not quite sure that gets across the message of speed that I was hoping for. Now remember the 30th of a second was really nice. The streaks of the bleachers were really long and yet parts of the athletes were sharp, and the action had been stopped. So I am going to take a look at that again. That one was the best one so far. Now the thing with pans is, don't expect to get it on your first try.

Just keep working at it. Keep trying. Keep experimenting with different shutter speeds. I mean eventually, you'll get to a point where your percentage of success goes up, but nobody, no matter how experienced they are, gets it on the first try. Have fun with it.

There are currently no FAQs about The Elements of Effective Photographs.

 
Share a link to this course

What are exercise files?

Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course. Save time by downloading the author's files instead of setting up your own files, and learn by following along with the instructor.

Can I take this course without the exercise files?

Yes! If you decide you would like the exercise files later, you can upgrade to a premium account any time.

Become a member Download sample files See plans and pricing

Please wait... please wait ...
Upgrade to get access to exercise files.

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Learn by watching, listening, and doing, Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along Premium memberships include access to all exercise files in the library.
Upgrade now


Exercise files

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

For additional information on downloading and using exercise files, watch our instructional video or read the instructions in the FAQ.

This course includes free exercise files, so you can practice while you watch the course. To access all the exercise files in our library, become a Premium Member.

join now Upgrade now

Are you sure you want to mark all the videos in this course as unwatched?

This will not affect your course history, your reports, or your certificates of completion for this course.


Mark all as unwatched Cancel

Congratulations

You have completed The Elements of Effective Photographs.

Return to your organization's learning portal to continue training, or close this page.


OK
Become a member to add this course to a playlist

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses—and create as many playlists as you like.

Get started

Already a member?

Become a member to like this course.

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses.

Get started

Already a member?

Exercise files

Learn by watching, listening, and doing! Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along. Exercise files are available with all Premium memberships. Learn more

Get started

Already a Premium member?

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Ask a question

Thanks for contacting us.
You’ll hear from our Customer Service team within 24 hours.

Please enter the text shown below:

The classic layout automatically defaults to the latest Flash Player.

To choose a different player, hold the cursor over your name at the top right of any lynda.com page and choose Site preferencesfrom the dropdown menu.

Continue to classic layout Stay on new layout
Exercise files

Access exercise files from a button right under the course name.

Mark videos as unwatched

Remove icons showing you already watched videos if you want to start over.

Control your viewing experience

Make the video wide, narrow, full-screen, or pop the player out of the page into its own window.

Interactive transcripts

Click on text in the transcript to jump to that spot in the video. As the video plays, the relevant spot in the transcript will be highlighted.

Are you sure you want to delete this note?

No

Notes cannot be added for locked videos.

Thanks for signing up.

We’ll send you a confirmation email shortly.


Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

Keep up with news, tips, and latest courses with emails from lynda.com.

Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

   
submit Lightbox submit clicked
Terms and conditions of use

We've updated our terms and conditions (now called terms of service).Go
Review and accept our updated terms of service.