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Lighting with Flash: Basics
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Setting up a behind-the-scenes shot


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Lighting with Flash: Basics

with David Hobby

Video: Setting up a behind-the-scenes shot

All right, it's the end of the day, we're all getting a little bit loopy--and by all I mean mostly me--and we've gone through some really standard stuff, straight light, adding a light with ambient, kind of working against the whole room, and then getting a little crazy over in front of the red. I wanted to either bring this back to center or just keep pushing it a little bit. And I think it is a very good idea to be willing to push your failure zone. That is to say if you're not falling down, you're not skiing fast enough.

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Lighting with Flash: Basics
1h 50m Appropriate for all May 10, 2013

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In the Lighting with Flash series, photographer and Strobist blog publisher David Hobby demonstrates how to use compact flash units in a variety of lighting scenarios. In this first installment, he covers the basics, starting with ambient window light and ending with a four-light shoot of a model. Along the way, the course covers a variety of fundamental lighting concepts as well as accessories such as ring lights and softboxes. The course includes diagrams and detailed explanations of the lighting setups.

Topics include:
  • Starting with window light
  • Adding a flash and umbrella
  • Using multiple strobes
  • Layering and creating a cone of light
  • Creating classic ring light glamour
Subjects:
Photography Cameras + Gear Flash Photography Portraits Lighting
Author:
David Hobby

Setting up a behind-the-scenes shot

All right, it's the end of the day, we're all getting a little bit loopy--and by all I mean mostly me--and we've gone through some really standard stuff, straight light, adding a light with ambient, kind of working against the whole room, and then getting a little crazy over in front of the red. I wanted to either bring this back to center or just keep pushing it a little bit. And I think it is a very good idea to be willing to push your failure zone. That is to say if you're not falling down, you're not skiing fast enough.

Every photographer I know who is consistently creating neat work is willing to fail, and there's one named Bill Allard, William Albert Allard, who says an interesting failure is far better than a boring success. So I feel pretty good because I've had a lot of interesting failures and some of them happened today. And what we wanted to do is to have sort of a meta-picture, and by that I mean a lighting photographer's picture in this outlet. So what I've done is to light Ramona with typical kind of a triangle hard light. We've got an SB3, a Softbox III, pushing from the front--don't change that pose; I like that-- and a couple of RIM lights hitting her from the back.

The RIM lights have tungsten gels on to throw some warmth into it. This has my standard one quarter CTO gel that I use on every time I put a key light on someone. I put it a little bit warmed up. This flash literally has that gel taped to it all the time. Our daylight is very cool coming in, and I wanted to push something against that warmth, so down on the ground, there's actually a, there's another SB 800 that has a CTB filter, which is the opposite of these tungsten gels. So I'm going to push into that window, and I'm going to include the lights into the picture, and I'm going to make a picture that's a little bit of--it's kind of weird, because we're shooting, but we're also shooting the fact that we're shooting. So I'm going to add one layer meta to it, we're shooting the fact, that we're shooting the fact, we're shooting a picture of shooting, sort of. See what I'm shooting for, so let's see what happens.

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