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Photography 101

Handheld shooting


From:

Photography 101

with Joseph Linaschke

Video: Handheld shooting

Part of holding your camera stable is quite simply how you hold it in your hands. If I'm holding the camera like this. You'll notice that I have a lot of just movement in here. If I zoom the camera at all it's probably going to move the lens physically. This just isn't very stable. So what I want to do is get my arms tucked down in, and really stabilize the camera. The first thing you can do is instead of holding your hand this way. Flip your hand the other direction so you have a nice, solid, stable platform and rest thee lens on it. By doing this you've just created a stable platform to rest the camera on. Now bring that to your face and bring your other hand up and grip it. To take your photo.

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Photography 101
2h 9m Beginner Mar 21, 2012

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

Today's cameras put an amazing amount of power in the hands of amateur photographers, but it's not always easy to make use of it. All those buttons, dials, and settings can be pretty intimidating. In this workshop, expert photographer Joseph Linaschke helps you understand what's going on inside your camera, explaining fundamentals like what an aperture is and how shutter speed works. Learn basics such as how to hold the camera, what various modes mean and when to use them, and even how and when to use the camera's flash. There's also creative instruction to guide you towards becoming a better photographer. As you become more comfortable with your gear, you'll find that many new creative possibilities open up for you and the quality of your photography improves.

Topics include:
  • Carry and hold that DSLR like a pro
  • Stabilizing the camera: from hands to water glasses to tripods
  • Using aperture, shutter speed, and ISO
  • What the buttons do
  • Manually controlling your autofocus
  • Working with flash
  • Thinking creatively
  • Buying new gear
Subjects:
Photography Cameras + Gear Photography Foundations video2brain
Author:
Joseph Linaschke

Handheld shooting

Part of holding your camera stable is quite simply how you hold it in your hands. If I'm holding the camera like this. You'll notice that I have a lot of just movement in here. If I zoom the camera at all it's probably going to move the lens physically. This just isn't very stable. So what I want to do is get my arms tucked down in, and really stabilize the camera. The first thing you can do is instead of holding your hand this way. Flip your hand the other direction so you have a nice, solid, stable platform and rest thee lens on it. By doing this you've just created a stable platform to rest the camera on. Now bring that to your face and bring your other hand up and grip it. To take your photo.

By doing this you're bringing your arms inside close to your body, keeping them nice, snug, and solid. So you have a good solid grip on the camera. Another thing is, you're quite often going to want to hold you camera vertically or in portrait mode. The problem is when you do this your right arm goes back out again. And now you've added that instability back in. What you really want to do is once again bring that hand in close to your body. But when you do this, this can become quite uncomfortable. So here's a neat tip, instead of holding your camera the way you normally would. Turn your hand sideways a bit, and then use your middle finger instead of your index finger to press the shutter button.

So instead of doing this, walk your hand around, and hold it like this. That way you get that arm down for stability, and you still have full control of the camera. The second thing is, take a good solid stance. If I'm standing legs side by side, legs close together, I'm not going to be very solid. But just like in martial arts, if you just put a leg back a little bit, get a nice solid stance and then shoot,SOUND you're going to find it-that you're much much more stable. That's absolutely a critical thing to do.

Get your arms in close, get a good stance, and you're going to be getting much more stabalized shots. Now there's a couple other things to think about when you're shooting. One of them is your breath. If you're breathing fast and hard, like you just came off of a run,SOUND you probably aren't going to be able to hold the camera that steady. On the other hand if you hold your breathSOUND and try and shoot, you're also not going to be that steady. What happens to most people when you hold your breath, is very quickly you start to shake a little bit. And that shake is going to get introduced into the camera. So it's better off if you just take a nice deep breath, and let it out slowly,SOUND while you're shooting. And that nice smooth easy breathing, is going to give you that minimized motion that you're looking for.

Of course, nobody's a rock, everybody moves a little bit, but what you want to do is move as little and as smoothly as possible. The last thing I want to show you up here is how you actually push the button. If I jam the button, I'm going to move the camera when I shoot. So if I go like this, and I'm going to exaggerate it a little bit. But if I go like this, 'cuz I'm pushing the button hard, I am actually moving the camera. Even, realistically, if I just kind of push it hard. (audio playing) It's too easy to move the camera. So don't do that. Squeeze it gently, you don't need to jam it, and you don't need to jam your finger down and then pop it right off right away.

Squeeze it down gently, it takes the picture, and then gently let your finger back off again. (audio playing) You shouldn't be able to see any movement at all. If someone is watching you hands, watching the camera they shouldn't see it move at when you take the picture. Now all this that I've just told you is all well and good when you're holding a smaller camera like this. Nice and easy to hold. But what if you get your hands on something bigger and heavier. Sometimes these stances can get a little bit tiring. So let me get a bigger camera for a minute.

So with this longer lens, and heavier body, shooting all day long like this can tend to get a bit well, heavy. And your arms might get tired and you might start to shake a little bit as well. One of the things that you can do to stabilize this, is find something else to rest it on. And if you can't rest it on something, you can rest it on your own body. Let me show you a couple of tips. This is one of my favorite ways to shoot when I'm shooting with a long lens. Instead of just holding it like this, I'll actually fold my arms over, kind of like a rifle hold, tuck them in. (audio playing) and like so. And that way I find I can hold the camera much more steady when I've got a big long lens on here. And frankly this isn't even that big and that long of a lens. Some lenses get even bigger and heavier than this. And so having that kind of extra stability really helps. Now of course you're not always going to be standing.

Sometimes you want to sit down. So, let me have a seat. And let's look at some other ways we can shoot. If you sit like this and maybe put one leg down for stability and prop a knee up. You can actually rest your camera on this other knee. (audio playing) So, that's one great way to shoot. Or maybe rest your arm up here, nestle it in, kind of like we did when we were standing, but now we're down on the ground. (audio playing) And again you have much more stabilized way of sitting and shooting.

Even if you just want to sit cross legged, and put your elbows into your knees. This can add a lot of stability too and this is something you can do almost anywhere. Just sit down very quickly stabilize and shoot. And you'll find that you can get yourself much more solid that you can when you're standing. So again overall its really important to stabilize that camera. Hold it as solid as you possibly can whether your using just your natural body. Or putting your arms into some funny position or getting down on the ground. Get it totally solid.

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