Digital Painting: Transforming a Portrait
Illustration by John Hersey

The Photoshop PSD format: Working in Photoshop and Painter


From:

Digital Painting: Transforming a Portrait

with John Derry

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Video: The Photoshop PSD format: Working in Photoshop and Painter

Because we'll be moving our image between Photoshop and Painter we'll need a way to migrate our work back and forth without losing information. The key to this is Photoshops native PSD format. Painter is capable of reading and writing files in this format with a few caviats. Let's go over them, first of all let's talk about the compatibility, basically layers are compatible with one another, however you do want to remember that in Photoshop, the default layer is called a normal layer.
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  1. 3m 53s
    1. Welcome
      1m 33s
    2. Using the exercise files
      35s
    3. Installing custom content
      1m 45s
  2. 5m 37s
    1. A short history of the portrait
      1m 42s
    2. Tools of the trade: Software
      2m 38s
    3. Tools of the trade: Hardware
      1m 17s
  3. 13m 1s
    1. The Photoshop PSD format: Working in Photoshop and Painter
      6m 20s
    2. Layer painting: Building up the image nondestructively
      3m 44s
    3. Getting your artwork printed
      2m 57s
  4. 29m 39s
    1. First step: Know your final output size
      5m 30s
    2. Extending edges for gallery wraps
      8m 14s
    3. Remove distractions
      5m 20s
    4. Preliminary tonal adjustment
      10m 35s
  5. 18m 26s
    1. Maximize the subjects via background adjustments
      7m 39s
    2. Back-to-front progression
      3m 44s
    3. The background is not the subject
      7m 3s
  6. 34m 42s
    1. Limit clothing detail
      9m 9s
    2. Handling patterns: Toning down selective detail
      10m 43s
    3. Handling patterns: Restoring selective detail
      5m 46s
    4. Jewelry is an extension of personality: More detail
      9m 4s
  7. 22m 56s
    1. Skin: Practice how to blend
      5m 12s
    2. Dealing with blemishes
      8m 54s
    3. Hands have personality!
      8m 50s
  8. 50m 10s
    1. An introduction to the face
      2m 8s
    2. Painting a child's face
      9m 43s
    3. Painting a child's eyelids and eyebrows
      2m 24s
    4. Painting a child's lips
      2m 57s
    5. Painting a woman's face
      8m 23s
    6. Painting a woman's lips
      6m 19s
    7. Painting a man's face
      9m 17s
    8. Painting a man's mouth
      4m 58s
    9. Painting a man's beard
      4m 1s
  9. 24m 23s
    1. Painting a child's eyes
      10m 31s
    2. Painting a child's eyes: Final touch-ups
      6m 26s
    3. Painting a woman's eyes
      5m 42s
    4. Painting a man's eyes
      1m 44s
  10. 28m 46s
    1. Painting a child's hair
      9m 56s
    2. Painting a woman's hair
      6m 51s
    3. Detailing a woman's hair
      6m 49s
    4. Painting a man's hair
      5m 10s
  11. 27m 3s
    1. Final painting touch-ups: Background
      9m 1s
    2. Final touch-ups: Subjects
      5m 21s
    3. Using vignetting to focus on the subjects
      2m 56s
    4. Adding lighting to the subjects' faces
      4m 23s
    5. Final color and density adjustments
      5m 22s
  12. 32s
    1. Next steps
      32s

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Watch the Online Video Course Digital Painting: Transforming a Portrait
4h 19m Intermediate Aug 29, 2013

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

Transform a portrait or family photo into a piece of art worthy of framing, in this digital painting tutorial with artist John Derry. John shares his library of custom brushstrokes and years of experience with you, and shows how to combine the powers of Adobe Photoshop and Corel Painter to convert your snapshots into art. Learn to adjust the tone of the original image; paint skin, eyes, and hair; minimize the background; and add subtle vignetting. Plus, John shows you how to bundle and submit your image to online services that will print your painting on canvas.

These techniques work with subjects of any age or skin tone, and are perfect for memorializing moments a photo can't quite do justice to.

Topics include:
  • Building the image nondestructively
  • Extending the edges of your image for gallery wraps
  • Removing distractions
  • Handling patterns
  • Making preliminary tonal adjustments
  • Blending skin
  • Adding lighting
  • Using vignetting to focus on the subjects
Subjects:
Design Photography
Software:
Painter Photoshop
Author:
John Derry

The Photoshop PSD format: Working in Photoshop and Painter

Because we'll be moving our image between Photoshop and Painter we'll need a way to migrate our work back and forth without losing information. The key to this is Photoshops native PSD format. Painter is capable of reading and writing files in this format with a few caviats. Let's go over them, first of all let's talk about the compatibility, basically layers are compatible with one another, however you do want to remember that in Photoshop, the default layer is called a normal layer.

Now in painter the default layer is interestingly called the default layer. Both the normal Photoshop, and the Painter default layer types, are exactly the same. So those layer types are consistent when they move back and forth between the two applications. Also, layer groups are compatible back and forth between each. So if you take several layers and group them together Both Photoshop and Painter will recognize one another's grouping of those layers.

Masks are also compatible between Photo Shop and Painter. Painter also addresses some of the blend modes, but it is a reduced set of modes compared to the longer list of modes that Photoshop has, for example. Selections. If you save with a Selection, both Photoshop and Painter will understand each other's version of that in the file. If you happen to use Guides, those are also compatible back and forth between the two apps.

And Embedded ICC profiles will both be recognized by both of them, which we'll be talking about here in a moment. Now, let's talk about incompatible aspects. Painter, for example, has what's called dynamic plugin layers, and then over in Photoshop, you have something called adjustment layers. They might sound the same, but they're not. Those two bits of information, if the other app gets that bit of information in the file, it's going to discard it because it doesn't know what it is. Both have text, but each others form of text is entirely different, so you can't transfer native text format information back and forth between the two applications.

Shapes thats another thing, both Photoshop and Painter have something called shapes. But they are not compatible at all. Then you have transformed shapes in Painter. You can save a transformation and actually keep it in a layer. The same is possible in Photoshop within their smart objects. However, once again, each application doesn't have any idea what the other apps version of that is so they will simply discard it if it finds it when it tries to open that file.

Painter has watercolor layers for example, and Photoshop doesn't know anything about watercolor, so it's not going to be able to do anything with it. And the same is true in Photoshop with their layer styles. They're great in Photoshop, but if you try and bring it over to Painter, Painter is just going to kick it out, because it's never heard of layer styles. You can get into some other special layers in paint or something like a liquid ink or (INAUDIBLE). Those are things that Photoshop just doesn't understand. And then back again over in Photoshop something like vector masks, or layer fill opacity, those are things that it can't deal with.

So as long as you stay with the normal layer which is Photoshop's basic layer, and the default layer in Painter which is its same version of that type of layer, you're going to do fine. And for the project we're doing, none of this esoteric stuff I've been describing is needed at all. So, we're doing a very basic transfer just using the stock standard layers throughout the application. As we're working, and so we won't have any problem with things falling off the edge of the earth when we're going back and forth.

Now, I do want to show you something that's very important, and it has to do with color management. And to show you this we're going to open up each of the app's color management settings. So I'm going to go over here to Color Settings. Let's open this up, we'll keep this right here. Then I'm going to go to Painter and we'll open up its color management settings, so we can see both of these side by side. Now, here's the thing, it's very important that you set your color management policies the same in both apps.

If you don't. You're going to have color inconsistencies when you move from one app to the other. And we did some experimentation here and we found that if any of you happen to have installed the Adobe Ace Engine in your system, you're going to run into color problems. And I don't know where the problem lies but my advice is to stay with the Apple Color Management Engine in both of the apps. So I've got the. Apple CMM over here in Photoshop and the just happen to call it ICM over here but it's the same.

The Apple ICM here. The one thing you do want to make sure you disable is Blackpoint Compensation. That's a little bit more advanced than the color management is in Painter and you want to turn this off. Just to even make things more consistant. The other thing is, you can choose between either perceptual or relative color metric. A lot of times it has to do with a specific image, but if you don't use this very much, I would say keep it on perceptual for your purposes and so we want to make sure that over here, we have that same thing.

So, once we've set these settings, both to the Apple management, we set it to Perceptual, and we also turned off Black Point Compensation in Photoshop. We'll say okay for both of those, and now we will have a consistency when the image moves between these two apps, you wont get any surprises that the colors are way off. Oh, and I do want to mention this. That if you're working on Windows, what you're going to be looking for in terms of your color management engine, is in Painter you want to select the Windows CMS, and in Photoshop, select the Microsoft ICM engine.

The PSD format thankfully enables working back and forth between Photoshop and Painter. It's this compatibility that makes the Photoshop-Painter-Photoshop sandwich possible. Yum.

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