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Dealing with "commands out of sync" in prepared statements


From:

Accessing Databases with Object-Oriented PHP

with David Powers

Video: Dealing with "commands out of sync" in prepared statements

In the previous video, we created a transaction to transfer money from one account to another But there was nothing to prevent the transaction from going ahead if the payer ran out of funds. This is mysqli_check_balance.php, which you can find in the chapter six, 06_05 folder of the exercise files. This updates the previous script to roll back the transaction if the balance in the outgoing account falls below zero.
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  1. 13m 33s
    1. Welcome
      1m 4s
    2. What you should know before watching this course
      2m 8s
    3. Using the exercise files
      4m 56s
    4. Setting SQLite permissions
      1m 11s
    5. A quick primer on using PHP objects
      4m 14s
  2. 10m 12s
    1. Overview of PHP database APIs
      4m 5s
    2. Using prepared statements
      4m 24s
    3. Using transactions
      1m 43s
  3. 48m 57s
    1. Creating a database source name
      2m 3s
    2. Connecting to a database with PDO
      7m 27s
    3. Looping directly over a SELECT query
      3m 49s
    4. Fetching a result set
      8m 3s
    5. Finding the number of results from a SELECT query
      7m 14s
    6. Checking if a SELECT query contains results
      3m 32s
    7. Executing simple non-SELECT queries
      6m 2s
    8. Getting error messages
      7m 17s
    9. Using the quote() method to sanitize user input
      3m 30s
  4. 39m 51s
    1. Binding input and output values
      2m 36s
    2. Using named parameters
      9m 51s
    3. Using question marks as anonymous placeholders
      2m 35s
    4. Passing an array of values to the execute() method
      5m 20s
    5. Binding results to variables
      7m 53s
    6. Executing a transaction
      6m 54s
    7. Closing the cursor before running another query
      4m 42s
  5. 21m 20s
    1. Generating an array from a pair of columns
      2m 44s
    2. Setting an existing object's properties with a database result
      4m 42s
    3. Creating an instance of a specific class with a database result
      6m 1s
    4. Reusing a result set
      7m 53s
  6. 38m 14s
    1. Connecting to a database with MySQLi
      5m 57s
    2. Setting the character set
      1m 57s
    3. Submitting a SELECT query and getting the number of results
      4m 4s
    4. Fetching the result
      7m 35s
    5. Rewinding the result for reuse
      3m 20s
    6. Handling non-SELECT queries
      5m 27s
    7. Getting error messages
      5m 47s
    8. Sanitizing user input with real_escape_string()
      4m 7s
  7. 27m 49s
    1. Initializing and preparing a statement
      4m 17s
    2. Binding parameters and executing a prepared statement
      5m 55s
    3. Binding output variables
      5m 6s
    4. Executing a MySQLi transaction
      7m 5s
    5. Dealing with "commands out of sync" in prepared statements
      5m 26s
  8. 24m 7s
    1. Buffered and unbuffered queries
      4m 19s
    2. Using real_query()
      6m 1s
    3. Freeing resources that are no longer needed
      2m 31s
    4. Submitting multiple queries
      6m 41s
    5. Creating an instance of a class from a result set
      4m 35s
  9. 3m 31s
    1. PDO and MySQLi compared
      3m 31s

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Watch the Online Video Course Accessing Databases with Object-Oriented PHP
3h 47m Intermediate Jul 07, 2014

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

Now that PHP has true object-oriented capabilities, it's best practice to access databases using PDO (PHP Data Objects) and MySQLi. These methods produce database-neutral code that works with over a dozen systems, including MySQL, SQL Server, PostgreSQL, and SQLite. Learn how to use PDO and MySQLi to perform basic select, insert, update, and delete operations; improve security with prepared statements; and use transactions to execute multiple queries simultaneously. Author David Powers also covers advanced topics like instantiating custom objects, and compares PDO to MySQLi so you can decide which method is right for you.

Topics include:
  • Connecting to a database with PDO or MySQLi
  • Fetching a result set
  • Executing simple non-SELECT queries
  • Sanitizing user input
  • Binding input and output values
  • Passing an array of values to the execute() method
  • Working with advanced PDO fetch methods
  • Executing a MySQLi transaction
  • Freeing resources that are no longer needed
  • Submitting multiple queries
  • Creating an instance of a class from a result set
Subject:
Developer
Software:
PHP
Author:
David Powers

Dealing with "commands out of sync" in prepared statements

In the previous video, we created a transaction to transfer money from one account to another But there was nothing to prevent the transaction from going ahead if the payer ran out of funds. This is mysqli_check_balance.php, which you can find in the chapter six, 06_05 folder of the exercise files. This updates the previous script to roll back the transaction if the balance in the outgoing account falls below zero.

But adding in this extra step results in MySQLi generating a fatal error. Before examining the code, let's take a look at the error message by loading the page into a browser. It says that the fatal error is a call to a member function fetch_assoc on a non-object on line 83. So let's examine the code to see what's happening on line 83. We need to go all the way down to the bottom of the page, and line 83 is the beginning of the while loop that displays the balances.

And that balances query is executed here on line 59. And it's got nothing to do with the transaction or with rolling back the transaction if there are insufficient resources. So let's go back to the top of the page to see what the new code does and see if we can find the cause of this fatal error. On line 10, there's a new select query that checks the payer's balance. And lines 19 to 23 initialize a statement called check and bind payer to the question mark placeholder in the new select query, declaring its status type to be a string. And the new prepared statement is executed down here on line 40. On the following line, the result is bound to a variable called bal and then fetched. And if bal is less than 0, this conditional statement on lines 45 to 48 rolls back the transaction and sets an appropriate error message. The rest of the transaction is inside the else block down here. All this looks fairly straightforward, but as we've seen, executing this new prepared statement causes the script to collapse like a house of cards.

To debug the issue, I first used echo to display the value of bal, and that worked okay. So the next thing I have to look at was the receive statement, and receive is executed here on line 49. So to find out if there's a problem, let's use the receive statement's error property to find out what's going on. So we'll use echo and receive and its error property. So if we save that, go back to the browser, and refresh, we've now got this error message, Commands out of sync, you can't run this command now.

Basically, the problem is that MySQLi thinks there might be more results in the check statement and it won't run any further statements or queries until we store the results or close the statement. So let's just go back to the code. We've already bound the result to the variable bal and then fetched it. So there's no need to call the storeResult method. We've already got the value that we want. So let's close the statement to free up the resources required by MySQL. So, it's the check statement object and we just call its close method.

And that destroys the statement object and frees up all the resources connected with it. So let's just save the page and go back to the browser. And if we reload the page, all the error messages have gone away and John White's balance has been reduced to $600. So, if we continue reloading, down to 400, 200, getting dangerously close, 0. Reload again. Transaction failed. Insufficient funds in John White's account. So, closing that prepared statement when it was no longer needed solved the problem.

And although the other two prepared statements aren't causing problems, it's recommended that you close all statements explicitly when they're no longer needed. So let's go and fix that. And also, we don't need to display the error message from receive because there is no message now, so scroll down to the bottom. And then after the transaction, we've got two prepared statements. The first one is pay. We need to close that, and also close receive.

MySQL is very fussy about trying to run another query when there might still be unused results that haven't been stored in PHP memory. In other words, unbuffered results. To prevent this happening with prepared statements, it's a good idea to call the close method on a statement as soon as it's no longer needed. And in the next chapter, we'll take a look at the difference between buffered and unbuffered results and other situations where you might get the commands out of sync error.

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