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Outlook 2010: Time Management with Calendar and Tasks
Illustration by Neil Webb

Using Day, Week, and Month view


From:

Outlook 2010: Time Management with Calendar and Tasks

with Gini Courter

Video: Using Day, Week, and Month view

This view called the Day, Week, Month View is the default view in Outlook starting with Outlook 2007, and it's a wonderful view that allows you to see both your Calendar and your Task. It's a dynamic view. In prior versions of Outlook I often set up additional views, and I don't need many of them, and I've found starting in Outlook 2007 that I really don't need many more views other than this fabulous Day, Week, Month View. When I'm in Day, Week, Month View, I have on the Home tab a group called Arrange that lets me see a specific day.

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Outlook 2010: Time Management with Calendar and Tasks
2h 27m Intermediate Jan 17, 2012

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

Rediscover the robust task management features in Microsoft Outlook 2010. Author Gini Courter explains the difference between Outlook tasks and To-Do Lists, and shows how to use Outlook 2010 to handle both business and personal schedules, from making appointments, to creating and completing tasks, to color-coding calendars and tasks for at-a-glance review.

Topics include:
  • Creating an appointment, event, or meeting
  • Inviting others
  • Creating recurring meetings
  • Flagging emails
  • Creating tasks from email or from scratch
  • Creating custom QuickSteps
  • Applying categories to tasks and to-do items
  • Completing a task and sending an update
  • Setting calendar and task list options
Subjects:
Business Productivity Time Management
Software:
Office Outlook
Author:
Gini Courter

Using Day, Week, and Month view

This view called the Day, Week, Month View is the default view in Outlook starting with Outlook 2007, and it's a wonderful view that allows you to see both your Calendar and your Task. It's a dynamic view. In prior versions of Outlook I often set up additional views, and I don't need many of them, and I've found starting in Outlook 2007 that I really don't need many more views other than this fabulous Day, Week, Month View. When I'm in Day, Week, Month View, I have on the Home tab a group called Arrange that lets me see a specific day.

So if I'm looking at, for example, the 15th and I click on Day, I'm getting to see the 15th and at the bottom there's a Tasks section, and if I take a look at the Work Week, there is my Tasks section again, and I can see all seven-day week. So it's a little bit of a change from Outlook 2007 where this was done with an Option button at the top. And then I can see the entire month, and I have the ability here to Show Low Detail, Medium Detail, and High Detail. Let's see how that looks. With Low Detail, all I'm going to see is anything that is an all day event.

So you can tell that my holidays take all day and that this deadline was entered as an event. It's good for spotting where my vacation days are, days I had sick days, out of the office days for conferences, and so on. With a Medium Level of detail I can actually see the text for events like I could previously, but anyplace that I have an appointment, I'm seeing some color behind here. Now, one of these actually has a category on it, you can tell because it looks orange, but the rest of these don't have categories yet. But I can see that I have some busyness.

If all I want to be able to do is look back and see how crowded the day is, the ones with more lines have more appointments in them and the ones with thicker lines have longer appointments in them. And then the default, which is a High Level Detail, with the default I can see both events and appointments and how I will tell them apart is in two ways. First is that my events are going to not have a time at the start of them. Notice this time here, 9 am, well, that's not an event, it doesn't take all day, it has a specific starting time.

And my events are also bolded. So I can spot items that are events, because first, they're at the top of the list, they appear up here before anything with the time, and then they don't have a time associated with them. So here's my first default view, which is Day, Week, Month View looking at a Month. When I switch to Week or Work Week or Day, I get a Tasks section that's down at the bottom here. We're going to work with the Tasks and the Calendar later, but if you can't see this, the odds are pretty good that you actually have minimized it so it doesn't show, and all you see is this two active Tasks that are available here.

It's understandable that you would do this. A lot of us go in and as soon as we get a Calendar, we make sure that we can see absolutely as much time in it as we can. But I want to encourage you if you've done this to go ahead and give yourself some task time back, so you can see four or five tasks here. And then notice that there's actually a minimize button here, a little downward pointing arrow, so if I need to see more Calendar, I can, and then I can kick it back and get my Task pane back again. However much space I have devoted at the bottom of the Week to tasks is the same space that's available when I switch over here to the Day.

So in my Day View I'm seen a day in all of its glory. Here I get to see tasks that would be available or required to do on just that day. So if I go back here, I'll notice that I have a task on Wednesday the 14th its do to Follow-Up with a Vendor, as well as a Meeting here during the day. Again, you can make this smaller if you wish; you can make it larger once again. So it's easy enough to switch between your different views here in the Day, Week, Month View, and to take a look at a specific day or week and its tasks, or month, which you see without the tasks.

One more thought, if you have access to someone else's Calendar, for example, your boss' calendar or someone who is a direct report to you, even if you've been given delegate permission to their Task List, it will not appear in the Calendar. The only Task List that will appear at the bottom of the calendar in the Day, Work Week or Week arrangement of this view is your very own Task List.

There are currently no FAQs about Outlook 2010: Time Management with Calendar and Tasks.

 
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