Start learning with our library of video tutorials taught by experts. Get started

Outlook 2010: Time Management with Calendar and Tasks

Creating custom Quick Steps


From:

Outlook 2010: Time Management with Calendar and Tasks

with Gini Courter

Video: Creating custom Quick Steps

You are not constrained to the five built-in Quick Steps in Outlook 2010; you can create your own Quick Steps. Now when you do this you are not going to get extra room to display Quick Steps, so if you have 20 of them you're going to spend some time going and finding them, you have to scroll to get to them. However, it's really great to create Quick Steps to help you process information in your mail folders. So I would like to create a new Quick Step and here is the heart of what it's going to do.

Watch this entire course now—plus get access to every course in the library. Each course includes high-quality videos taught by expert instructors.

Become a member
Please wait...
Outlook 2010: Time Management with Calendar and Tasks
2h 27m Intermediate Jan 17, 2012

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

Rediscover the robust task management features in Microsoft Outlook 2010. Author Gini Courter explains the difference between Outlook tasks and To-Do Lists, and shows how to use Outlook 2010 to handle both business and personal schedules, from making appointments, to creating and completing tasks, to color-coding calendars and tasks for at-a-glance review.

Topics include:
  • Creating an appointment, event, or meeting
  • Inviting others
  • Creating recurring meetings
  • Flagging emails
  • Creating tasks from email or from scratch
  • Creating custom QuickSteps
  • Applying categories to tasks and to-do items
  • Completing a task and sending an update
  • Setting calendar and task list options
Subjects:
Business Productivity Time Management
Software:
Office Outlook
Author:
Gini Courter

Creating custom Quick Steps

You are not constrained to the five built-in Quick Steps in Outlook 2010; you can create your own Quick Steps. Now when you do this you are not going to get extra room to display Quick Steps, so if you have 20 of them you're going to spend some time going and finding them, you have to scroll to get to them. However, it's really great to create Quick Steps to help you process information in your mail folders. So I would like to create a new Quick Step and here is the heart of what it's going to do.

The first thing it's going to do is it's going to mark the selected item as read. The second thing is it's going to categorize it and the third thing is it's going to move it. So, all three of these items and this is to categorize items for the Northern California Expansion. So when I have an item that comes in for the Northern California Expansion what I want to do is note that I've read it, I want to categorize it and I want to move it to that folder, all three of those things. So let's go back to the inbox and let's create a new rule.

The default name for this is My Quick Step. Microsoft didn't waste a lot of time trying to think of a great name here. And I'm going to say Northern California Expansion, that's the name of it and it is very similar to the move rule that I already have, but it's going to do a few extra things for me. So the first thing it's going to do is to mark it as read. The second thing it's going to do is it's going to categorize a message. So notice when I choose Categorize Message, I get to choose a category.

If I want to choose more than one by the way, I can go to All Categories, or one of the things I could do is I could say always prompt me to ask me what category it is. So if I have five projects going on, rather than creating five rules, create one rule that says prompt me for the category, Always ask. I'm going to go ahead and use Purple Category or go to the All Categories list, take the Purple Category and rename it and there is my North California category, so I am going to say OK, North California.

So, two of the things are done. Now the last thing that I want to do is I actually want to move this item to a folder. So I'm going to choose Move to folder under Filing. Notice I can change the status, set at Categories, Tasks and so on, I can Respond, but I'm going to actually move this to a folder and the folder that I want to send it to is Northern California Expansion. I can keep adding steps on here as long as I want to. They'll be executed in the order in which I place them. I can Choose a shortcut key, I'm really limited here.

I have only a small number of shortcuts that I can actually assign and these Ctrl+Shift shortcuts I get Ctrl+Shift+1 through Ctrl+Shift+9 and I really need to keep them in my head. But if I have a few of these, I can usually do that. So Northern California Expansion I could say, when I do Ctrl+Shift+1 I want to actually run this Quick Step. And I can then put some text in here for tooltip text. So it says Mark item as read, add North Calif category and move to No Calif Expansion folder.

That's my help text. So I am going to go ahead and finish this and you'll see that here is my new rule, notice when I point to it there is the text, Mark item as read, add North Calif category and move to No Calif Expansion folder. So I am going to go ahead and choose another item that I want to move here and I am going to North California Expansion. Here it is, the category is assigned as I asked it to, my North California category.

So I can set up Quick Steps of my own to do any number of things. I am going to go back to create new again and I just like to review the actions that are possible. When I am filing I can move an item, copy an item, delete it, or permanently delete it, deleting it moves it to my Deleted Items folder, Permanently deletes it without stopping in the Deleted Items folder. I can mark an item as read or unread and set its importance. I can assign a Category or Clear All Categories.

I can flag a message or clear all flags, mark a message as complete, create a new task with this e-mail item as an attachment or create a task using simply the text of the message. And you're going to see how these kind of task creations work in the next chapter, in the next series of movies. But, for right now know that I can take all of the text or the message itself as an attachment and include that with a new task. I can automatically respond with a new message.

I can forward the message that I have, reply or reply to all. Now if you're going to do any of these you'll probably associate them with some other steps, because if all you were going to do is Reply All, why wouldn't you simply choose it up here. If all you were going to do is reply, why wouldn't you simply again choose it on the Home tab at the ribbon in the Response group. But we might want to do a series of things. I might want to take this and set up a new meeting and include the text as an attachment or as part of the message.

And then I can choose and say move all the messages in this conversation or ignore all the messages that are in this conversation and have those as quick steps again. So a wide range of items remembering of course we can do as many of these actions as we wish to an item being careful that we sequence them properly for example, if we are ultimately going to delete a message it doesn't make a lot of sense to categorize it. But we can't categorize it after we've deleted it; some of the steps actually have to be the last thing on the list.

So, feel free to give it a try to create some Quick Steps that would allow you to quickly process things. For example to move something to a Done folder, to be able to move items for those of you who use personal folders and sort things, manually archive or move items out of your Inbox into personal folders. You can create some powerful rules that will allow you to quickly and easily move things to specific folders. I encourage you to experiment this is a new feature, it's a powerful new feature and it will help you very efficiently work with creating tasks, creating Calendar items or simply moving or routing the mail within your system with one quick and easy click on a Quick Step.

There are currently no FAQs about Outlook 2010: Time Management with Calendar and Tasks.

Share a link to this course
Please wait... Please wait...
Upgrade to get access to exercise files.

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Learn by watching, listening, and doing, Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along Premium memberships include access to all exercise files in the library.
Upgrade now


Exercise files

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

For additional information on downloading and using exercise files, watch our instructional video or read the instructions in the FAQ.

This course includes free exercise files, so you can practice while you watch the course. To access all the exercise files in our library, become a Premium Member.

Upgrade now

Are you sure you want to mark all the videos in this course as unwatched?

This will not affect your course history, your reports, or your certificates of completion for this course.


Mark all as unwatched Cancel

Congratulations

You have completed Outlook 2010: Time Management with Calendar and Tasks.

Return to your organization's learning portal to continue training, or close this page.


OK
Become a member to add this course to a playlist

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses—and create as many playlists as you like.

Get started

Already a member?

Become a member to like this course.

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses.

Get started

Already a member?

Exercise files

Learn by watching, listening, and doing! Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along. Exercise files are available with all Premium memberships. Learn more

Get started

Already a Premium member?

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Ask a question

Thanks for contacting us.
You’ll hear from our Customer Service team within 24 hours.

Please enter the text shown below:

The classic layout automatically defaults to the latest Flash Player.

To choose a different player, hold the cursor over your name at the top right of any lynda.com page and choose Site preferencesfrom the dropdown menu.

Continue to classic layout Stay on new layout
Welcome to the redesigned course page.

We’ve moved some things around, and now you can



Exercise files

Access exercise files from a button right under the course name.

Mark videos as unwatched

Remove icons showing you already watched videos if you want to start over.

Control your viewing experience

Make the video wide, narrow, full-screen, or pop the player out of the page into its own window.

Interactive transcripts

Click on text in the transcript to jump to that spot in the video. As the video plays, the relevant spot in the transcript will be highlighted.

Thanks for signing up.

We’ll send you a confirmation email shortly.


Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

Keep up with news, tips, and latest courses with emails from lynda.com.

Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

   
submit Lightbox submit clicked