New Feature: Playlist Center! Pick a topic and let our playlists guide the way.

Easy-to-follow video tutorials help you learn software, creative, and business skills.Become a member

Saving your presentations

From: PowerPoint for Mac 2011 Essential Training

Video: Saving your presentations

Probably the most important thing to learn about working with a PowerPoint presentation is how to save it. You don't want to have to redo your work if something goes wrong, like a crash or a power outage. Well, there are some fail-safes built into PowerPoint, but there are also many different ways to save a presentation, so we are going to talk about those now, continuing to work with our Orientation presentation. Let's just start by making a minor change. We'll click on the first slide in the Thumbnail pane, and just click in front of the 2010 Year in the subtitle, and let's add a month.

Saving your presentations

Probably the most important thing to learn about working with a PowerPoint presentation is how to save it. You don't want to have to redo your work if something goes wrong, like a crash or a power outage. Well, there are some fail-safes built into PowerPoint, but there are also many different ways to save a presentation, so we are going to talk about those now, continuing to work with our Orientation presentation. Let's just start by making a minor change. We'll click on the first slide in the Thumbnail pane, and just click in front of the 2010 Year in the subtitle, and let's add a month.

Let's try December and a space. All right, when we click off the slide, we can see exactly what it's going to look like, and we made a minor adjustment. We want to save that. The easiest way, of course, to save is to click the save icon on the toolbar. It looks like a floppy disk, and this simply updates any changes. You don't have an opportunity to change where you're saving it to, to change the name, to change the format. All of that is accessed by using the Save As command, which we're going to look at in a moment. Now if you are in the habit of saving on a regular basis, it's not about habit, but there are some things built into PowerPoint to help you with that as well.

Let's take a quick look. We'll click PowerPoint on the toolbar and then select Preferences. Now from here, you are going to select or click the fourth button in. Again, it looks like a floppy disk, the save button, and you will see your save options that are set. Anything checked off is turned on, anything without a check, like prompting for document properties, is turned off. So if you wanted to add properties to your document, you'd do that manually. Or you could have it happen automatically every time you save, you will be prompted for those properties.

Things like who's the author and the date and time and that kind of stuff. They are all part of the document properties. Now if you look a little bit further down, there is a Save AutoRecover info every and the default set to 10 minutes. This means every 10 minutes there is a backup of your presentation that's being made, and it can be recovered at any time. So if you're in the habit of saving every 10 minutes, you really don't have to because PowerPoint's doing it for you, and you can see it's going to be saved with the new extension there, pptx.

So that's just something that's there in the background you should know about. But if you want to save your presentation to another format, another location, or you want to change the name of your presentation, then you need to use Save As. We access that from the File menu, so click File, and choose Save As. Now, just before we do, you will notice down below there are some options that are quickly available, little shortcuts to save as pictures and movie. But when we click Save As, we'll be able to access those options as well.

And just before we save this, I want you to see something. The Compatibility Report is also available from here, something we talked about in a previous movie, and it does tell us that there is one compatibility issue that depends on the format were saving to. So if we click the Format button, and we choose an older format - for example, let's say we want to go back to PowerPoint 98 to 2004 - you will see we do have one compatibility issue. And if we want to see what that is, click Compatibility Report, and it opens up.

So you see here we have a message that the check was run and at least one issue is found. If you don't like seeing this message, just click the check box and click OK. Now you will see over here in the Compatibility Report that because we have sections, we will lose those sections saving to the older PowerPoint 2003 format. We can close the Toolbox by clicking the red X in the top-left corner. Let's go back to file and Save As. Now let's say we want to change the location. You can navigate to a specific location, maybe your Documents, for example, or in this case the Desktop.

I am going to use the Desktop. We can change the format. Let's change it back now, and you'll see all the different formats you have to choose from. Specialty Formats appear down below, Common Formats at the top. You can even save this to a PDF, so a Portable Document Format that anybody could look at using Adobe reader. So it wouldn't be a presentation anymore; it would be an actual file saved to a movie a .mov file. You could even save it to a template, so you could use this as your starting point for future presentations.

But let's just leave it at 97 to 2004, so we are going to save it back. We do have that one issue. We already know what it is. Let's change the name from Orientation 6 to NewOrientation. So these are some of things you can do with Save As: change the name, change the location, and change the format. When you click Save, all the changes will be saved. If there was an issue - in this case there was - you can see some of the elements in your presentation may not work or may be removed.

So when we continue, the save is made. It doesn't look a whole lot different, but when we look over at the navigation pane, you'll notice those sections are gone, because we've saved back to an earlier format. We saw it in the Compatibility Report. We were warned those sections would be removed. You see the new name at the very top in the Title bar. All of those were available to us, thanks to the Save As option. Now of course, there are some other formats that we might want to save to, saving to a movie, different ways to share as well; we will be talking about those in upcoming movies.

Show transcript

This video is part of

Image for PowerPoint for Mac 2011 Essential Training
PowerPoint for Mac 2011 Essential Training

63 video lessons · 20841 viewers

David Rivers
Author

 
Expand all | Collapse all
  1. 4m 11s
    1. Welcome
      1m 20s
    2. Understanding PowerPoint
      2m 4s
    3. Using the exercise files
      47s
  2. 15m 58s
    1. Exploring the Presentation gallery
      4m 17s
    2. Understanding the Ribbon interface
      6m 7s
    3. Navigating presentations
      2m 56s
    4. Customizing the UI layout
      2m 38s
  3. 32m 42s
    1. Creating new presentations
      2m 56s
    2. Adding, removing, and arranging slides
      7m 5s
    3. Saving time with Outline mode
      5m 15s
    4. Separating slides into sections
      8m 37s
    5. Checking compatibility
      3m 15s
    6. Saving your presentations
      5m 34s
  4. 35m 23s
    1. Using themes
      4m 58s
    2. Creating your own themes
      2m 42s
    3. Changing the background
      5m 33s
    4. Designing slides
      3m 12s
    5. Working with slide layouts
      3m 58s
    6. Working with slide masters
      5m 51s
    7. Using headers and footers
      4m 25s
    8. Using and creating templates
      4m 44s
  5. 30m 14s
    1. Adding text with text slides and boxes
      3m 37s
    2. Adding text to a shape
      2m 16s
    3. Formatting text on a slide
      5m 42s
    4. Changing character direction
      4m 11s
    5. Creating lists using bullets and numbering
      5m 25s
    6. Changing spacing and indents
      4m 17s
    7. Finding and replacing content
      4m 46s
  6. 25m 28s
    1. Adding a table to a slide
      4m 47s
    2. Editing and formatting tables
      4m 25s
    3. Pasting a table from Excel
      5m 11s
    4. Inserting a chart
      5m 42s
    5. Pasting a chart from Excel
      5m 23s
  7. 26m 40s
    1. Inserting pictures and clip art
      2m 18s
    2. Replacing and adjusting pictures
      6m 40s
    3. Drawings and SmartArt
      6m 29s
    4. Adding video to a slide
      5m 53s
    5. Adding sound to a presentation
      5m 20s
  8. 18m 7s
    1. Using a template with animation
      5m 35s
    2. Animating objects on a slide
      6m 1s
    3. Using slide transition effects
      6m 31s
  9. 15m 7s
    1. Checking spelling
      5m 25s
    2. Finding synonyms, definitions, and translations
      4m 23s
    3. Setting AutoCorrect options
      5m 19s
  10. 40m 53s
    1. Using speaker notes
      3m 50s
    2. Showing and navigating a presentation
      4m 56s
    3. Using pointer options
      3m 59s
    4. Using presenter tools with two screens
      3m 44s
    5. Creating a self-running slideshow
      6m 40s
    6. Playing a self-running slideshow
      3m 44s
    7. Adding hyperlinks to a presentation
      5m 7s
    8. Using action buttons
      8m 53s
  11. 28m 5s
    1. Using comments
      3m 58s
    2. Printing notes, handouts, and slides
      4m 17s
    3. Sending a slideshow to iPhoto
      2m 57s
    4. Creating PowerPoint pictures
      2m 43s
    5. Creating a PowerPoint movie
      3m 56s
    6. Creating a PDF presentation
      1m 49s
    7. Creating custom slideshows
      3m 57s
    8. Broadcasting a presentation over the web
      4m 28s
  12. 8m 52s
    1. Changing PowerPoint preferences
      3m 29s
    2. Customizing the Ribbon and toolbars
      5m 23s
  13. 22s
    1. Goodbye
      22s

Start learning today

Get unlimited access to all courses for just $25/month.

Become a member
Sometimes @lynda teaches me how to use a program and sometimes Lynda.com changes my life forever. @JosefShutter
@lynda lynda.com is an absolute life saver when it comes to learning todays software. Definitely recommend it! #higherlearning @Michael_Caraway
@lynda The best thing online! Your database of courses is great! To the mark and very helpful. Thanks! @ru22more
Got to create something yesterday I never thought I could do. #thanks @lynda @Ngventurella
I really do love @lynda as a learning platform. Never stop learning and developing, it’s probably our greatest gift as a species! @soundslikedavid
@lynda just subscribed to lynda.com all I can say its brilliant join now trust me @ButchSamurai
@lynda is an awesome resource. The membership is priceless if you take advantage of it. @diabetic_techie
One of the best decision I made this year. Buy a 1yr subscription to @lynda @cybercaptive
guys lynda.com (@lynda) is the best. So far I’ve learned Java, principles of OO programming, and now learning about MS project @lucasmitchell
Signed back up to @lynda dot com. I’ve missed it!! Proper geeking out right now! #timetolearn #geek @JayGodbold

Are you sure you want to delete this note?

No

Thanks for signing up.

We’ll send you a confirmation email shortly.


Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

Keep up with news, tips, and latest courses with emails from lynda.com.

Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

   
submit Lightbox submit clicked
Terms and conditions of use

We've updated our terms and conditions (now called terms of service).Go
Review and accept our updated terms of service.