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Nuke 6 New Features
Illustration by John Hersey

The Reveal tool


From:

Nuke 6 New Features

with Steve Wright

Video: The Reveal tool

I've reset Nuke so that we can take a look at the procedure for doing the Reveal Paint from different frames of the same clip. We're going to need a clip to look at. So, we'll type R on the keyboard to get our Read node, select the NUKE WORKSHOP, select Lesson_03_Media, select the Reveal clip and bring in the 10-frame reveal clip here. Okay, with the Read node selected, type P on the keyboard to get a RotoPaint node, type one in the keyboard and hook it up to the viewer and we'll make the viewer a little larger so we can see better of what we're doing.
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  1. 7m 45s
    1. Welcome
      1m 56s
    2. What is NukeX?
      5m 0s
    3. Using the exercise files
      49s
  2. 1h 11m
    1. Learning the interface
      5m 15s
    2. Drawing shapes
      1m 41s
    3. Editing shapes
      5m 1s
    4. Keyframe animation
      6m 4s
    5. Property panel tabs
      7m 8s
    6. The shape list
      4m 26s
    7. Output settings
      1m 11s
    8. Workflow examples
      5m 33s
    9. Creating garbage mattes
      4m 55s
    10. Drawing strokes
      4m 16s
    11. Editing strokes
      4m 30s
    12. The Clone tool
      1m 37s
    13. Editing the Clone tool
      2m 54s
    14. The Reveal tool
      9m 2s
    15. The Blur tool
      2m 21s
    16. The output mask
      2m 57s
    17. The Dodge tool
      2m 32s
  3. 27m 38s
    1. Basic compositing
      3m 51s
    2. Using the Screen controls
      2m 50s
    3. Using the Screen Matte controls
      3m 37s
    4. The Crop feature
      2m 28s
    5. Holdout and garbage mattes
      2m 19s
    6. The Tuning controls
      1m 58s
    7. The Bias controls
      2m 37s
    8. Screen replacement
      2m 15s
    9. Multipass keying
      4m 37s
    10. Color-correcting the foreground
      1m 6s
  4. 17m 8s
    1. Basic setup
      3m 24s
    2. The Ultimatte workflow
      5m 18s
    3. Using the matte tools
      4m 16s
    4. Spill suppression
      4m 10s
  5. 28m 8s
    1. Overview
      2m 42s
    2. Pre-processing the greenscreen
      3m 25s
    3. Creating specialized keys
      7m 14s
    4. The preliminary composite
      6m 14s
    5. Creating supplemental keys
      6m 22s
    6. Alternative workflows
      2m 11s
  6. 24m 39s
    1. Editing control points
      4m 49s
    2. Editing the warp grid
      2m 52s
    3. Keyframe animation
      4m 42s
    4. Morphing
      10m 7s
    5. Additional tabs
      2m 9s
  7. 33m 20s
    1. Drawing splines
      6m 3s
    2. Drawing open splines
      2m 0s
    3. Limiting the warp
      7m 1s
    4. Warping to a target image
      5m 54s
    5. Morphing
      8m 1s
    6. The correspondence points
      4m 21s
  8. 9m 3s
    1. The MotionBlur2D node
      5m 55s
    2. Using the VectorBlur node
      3m 8s
  9. 10m 29s
    1. The ZBlur node
      6m 33s
    2. Image-based blurs
      3m 56s
  10. 11m 13s
    1. Navigating the Dope Sheet
      5m 17s
    2. Shifting keyframes
      5m 56s
  11. 5m 22s
    1. Making a group
      2m 50s
    2. Making a gizmo
      2m 32s

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Nuke 6 New Features
4h 6m Intermediate Aug 18, 2010 Updated Feb 13, 2012

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

Author Steve Wright explores the new features found in the 3D digital compositor Nuke 6. The course introduces the RotoPaint node for drawing and painting effects, the Keylight keyer for creating mattes and composites, and the SplineWarp node for warping images. The course also explains how to merge keys, animate with keyframes, and create image-based blurs. Exercise files accompany the course.

Nuke 6 New Features was created and produced by Steve Wright. We are honored to host his material in the lynda.com Online Training Library®.

Topics include:
  • Exploring NukeX
  • Working with the new paint tools
  • Using the Clone and Reveal tools
  • Reviewing the Keylight matte controls
  • Creating Keylight holdout and garbage mattes
  • Performing multipass keying
  • Working with mattes in Ultimatte
  • Creating specialized keys
  • Drawing and warping splines
  • Exploring the MotionBlur2D and ZBlur nodes
  • Navigating the Dope Sheet
  • Making gizmos
Subjects:
3D + Animation Video Keying Compositing Visual Effects
Software:
Nuke
Author:
Steve Wright

The Reveal tool

I've reset Nuke so that we can take a look at the procedure for doing the Reveal Paint from different frames of the same clip. We're going to need a clip to look at. So, we'll type R on the keyboard to get our Read node, select the NUKE WORKSHOP, select Lesson_03_Media, select the Reveal clip and bring in the 10-frame reveal clip here. Okay, with the Read node selected, type P on the keyboard to get a RotoPaint node, type one in the keyboard and hook it up to the viewer and we'll make the viewer a little larger so we can see better of what we're doing.

All right, so here's the deal with this clip. What we want to do is on frame 5, her eyes are closed and we want to reveal through the open eyes from frame 1. So, we'll put the playhead on frame 5 and select the Reveal tool and immediately, the menus above the viewer change for the Reveal tool. I'm going to widen the viewer window so that our menu is not all crunched up. Background 1 or BG1 will be the source for the Reveal tool and you'll find it here on the side of the RotoPaint node, BG1.

You think we could hook it to the original clip, but we can't. What you have to do is make a copy of the original Read node and paste it over here and hook BG1 up to that. So, the setup for a reveal within the same clip is the clip is hooked to the BG input and a copy of that same clip is hooked to BG1. You'll now be able to read BG1 and select different frames than the current frame. Next, we'll turn on our onion skin option. This allows us to see a mix between the current frame and the offset frame.

So, the next thing we need to set is the time mode. We have relative, which is relative to the current frame, or absolute, which means we're going to go get a specific frame number, and that is what we want to use in this case. I want to get frame 1, so I'll set the time mode for absolute and set the time offset or delta T for 1. So that means go get frame 1 absolute. As you can see, the onion skin changes as I step through the different frames. Okay, it's back to frame 1 which is the one I want. I'll then turn off the onion skin, zoom into my picture, I can now bring my viewer size back down.

Hold down the Shift key to set my brush size and do a reveal of frame 1 into frame 5. To check my work, I can select both of these strokes and we make this window a little larger and toggle the Visibility buttons on and off. Let's make the viewer wide again so that we can see our menu up here. With the time mode set for absolute, if I move the playhead to frame 6, I'm still going to be revealing in frame 1. So this time, I'm going to set the time mode to relative.

Now, as I change the playhead, my source frame will be relative to the current playhead. So, in the relative time mode with the delta T at +1 that would mean use the frame following this one. Delta T of 0 is obviously an offset of no frame, so that would be revealing through to the same frame. -1 is the previous, -2, -3, -4. I'm now four frames ahead of my current frame. So, on frame 6 I'll be revealing from frame 2.

Turn off the onion skin, the viewer back here, and we'll do a paint through from frame 2 to frame 6. Now, if I move the playhead forward to frame 7, turn on onion skin, I'll now be doing a reveal from frame 3 to frame 7. I'll put the playhead back to frame 6. We don't need this Read node anymore, so I'm going to clear that. If you'd like the list window to be larger so you can see more strokes, you can always increase the size in the Property panel.

Let's take a closer look at this source thing and how that works. To show you that, I'm going to go to the Brush tool and I'll select an attractive color and we'll paint that over one eye. So that now is Stroke6. So, the way we read that is the source for Stroke6 is color, which of course is that color chip that I selected. If I do a right mouse popup and I say the source for Stroke6 is the foreground, that means in RotoPaint speak, the foreground is the top composited layer of all the strokes.

In other words, you're seeing strokes 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 revealed through Stroke6. So, we're seeing the repaired eye, we're seeing the eye that we revealed through. If I change the Source to background, that means I may be looking at the original clip coming in on the BG input. Now that we've seen how to reveal between different frames of the same clip, let's take a look at how we would reveal between several different clips. I've reset Nuke so that we can see how to do a Reveal Paint through three different background clips.

So, let's go get a clip, we'll select R for the Read node, go to the NUKE WORKSHOP > Lesson_03_Media, select the Reveal clip, and bring in those 10 frames. Add a Paint node, connect it to the viewer, you all know how to do that. Okay, for our three inputs, I'm just going to use from the popup menus a CheckerBoard, ColorBars and a ColorWheel.

Now I need all of these to be the same size as my input clip. So, I'm going to go to the project settings so I can set the full size format to match my input clip, 512x413. Now, all three of these nodes would be the same size as my input clip, which is what I'm looking for. I'll clear the Property bin and we'll put the RotoPaint node back in by double-clicking on that. I also want to float my RotoPaint node, so I've got more room for my Reveal menus. Make the viewer a little taller, move this over here, move this over here.

Next, we'll go to the Clone tool and select the Reveal tool and of course, all the menus change. And here is where we select the different background inputs. So first we'll have to hook them up. So, we'll go to the RotoPaint node, pull out the left arrowhead and we get BG1, We'll hook that to the CheckerBoard. New arrowhead pops up, pull that out. It's BG2. Hook that to the ColorBars. New arrowhead pops up, pull that out. It's BG3, hook that to the ColorWheel and there we have it.

our three different background inputs to the RotoPaint node, and we select between them by going to this popup here. So, if I turn on the onion skin, background 1 is the CheckerBoard and we see that onion skinned with our clip. Background 2 is the ColorBars and there is the onion skin and background 3 is the ColorWheel and there is the onion skin for that. To align each of these backgrounds with the foreground, we would use the reveal popup but everything is ghosted out. That's not quite working yet.

So, we're going to do it without that. I'll turn off the onion skin. I'll select background 1 so I'm talking to the CheckerBoard. I'll use Shift and drag to increase my brush size and I'll reveal through from the CheckerBoard. And if I go to background 2, which is the ColorBars, reveal through the ColorBars and then background 3, which is the ColorWheel, and reveal through the ColorWheel. We move the playhead to the next frame.

Now, if I want time offsets for those backgrounds, I would do that here. So, I'll select background 1, onion skin on. First, I'll set the time mode relative or absolute. Let's say absolute frame 3, turn off the onion skin, paint through. Then I'll switch to background 3, turn on the onion skin, do my transformation adjustments and my time adjustments. So, let's say I want to set this to relative -1.

There we go, all right. Turn off the onion skin and paint through to background 3. And by the way, you can check your time offsets over here in the Stroke list. Here's Stroke5. If we go to the Clone tab, we can see that the time offset was -1 and the time mode was relative. If we select Stroke4, the time mode was absolute and we had selected frame 3. So, each stroke remembers its own transformation offsets as well as its time offsets.

Now, we're ready to look at blur, sharpen, and smear using the Blur tool.

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