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Moodle 1.9 Essential Training for Students

Advanced wiki techniques


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Moodle 1.9 Essential Training for Students

with Chris Mattia

Video: Advanced wiki techniques

In an earlier movie we learned the basics of creating pages inside of a Wiki and adding content to it. Now let's learn some advanced techniques that allow us to enhance the content that we are adding to our Wiki. To do this, begin by first going into your course Wiki. In this case I'm going to click on the link for Research Project Wiki in the header block of my course. I'm taken into the main page for my Wiki under the View tab. Let's first create a link to another page that we can edit. To do this, click the tab for Edit and then at the end of the listing for Packing List, we'll create a new entry by hitting Enter or Return, a left-hand square bracket, a listing for Coral Group and then a right -hand square bracket. To convert these items into a list, I'll go to the beginning of each of these two lines and add an asterisk as the first character in each line to designate each of these as a list.

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Moodle 1.9 Essential Training for Students
1h 49m Beginner May 28, 2009

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

Moodle provides students with a rich environment of information, resources, and activities to enhance what is being taught in the classroom. In Moodle Essential Training for Students, Chris Mattia walks step by step through a typical Moodle course and shows students how to be successful. Chris shows how to post materials to a custom database, participate in a live chat with other students, and even access and complete assignments online.

Topics include:
  • Managing personal calendars
  • Contributing to an online glossary
  • Accessing grades and instructor feedback
  • Using Moodle's built-in discussion boards
  • Contributing content to a wiki inside Moodle
  • Customizing a student profile
  • Integrating the Moodle calendar with iCal and Outlook
  • Maintaining a personal blog
Subjects:
Elearning Education Educational Technology Higher Education LMS Student Tools
Software:
Moodle
Author:
Chris Mattia

Advanced wiki techniques

In an earlier movie we learned the basics of creating pages inside of a Wiki and adding content to it. Now let's learn some advanced techniques that allow us to enhance the content that we are adding to our Wiki. To do this, begin by first going into your course Wiki. In this case I'm going to click on the link for Research Project Wiki in the header block of my course. I'm taken into the main page for my Wiki under the View tab. Let's first create a link to another page that we can edit. To do this, click the tab for Edit and then at the end of the listing for Packing List, we'll create a new entry by hitting Enter or Return, a left-hand square bracket, a listing for Coral Group and then a right -hand square bracket. To convert these items into a list, I'll go to the beginning of each of these two lines and add an asterisk as the first character in each line to designate each of these as a list.

I'll then click the Save button, and now I have got a list of items that has my Packing List and a listing for my Coral Group. We will click the question mark to the end of the Coral Group listing and that creates the page for our Coral Group. I'll now go ahead and copy and paste some text that I have already written in another document. I'll open up my Text Editor where I have already got this text written. Select the text and copy it with Command+C or Ctrl+C. Then jump back over to my browser, click in the text field and hit Command+V or Ctrl+V to paste in that text. I can preview what this text is going to look like by simply hitting the Preview button.

At the top, I have got a Hypothesis, with the hypothesis that my Coral Group is going to explore during our research trip to Belize. Then I have got a listing for a Proposed Method that we are going to follow, including a listing for a scientific name of the organism that we are going to work with, Acropora palmata. We also have a place where we can add a link to Current Research Papers and a Sample Data Table. Let's go ahead and add some formatting to all of this text now. So if I scroll down in the window, we know already that we can add heading text by adding exclamation points to the front of each of our different headings.

We saw what happened to when we add three exclamation points to add a top level heading. If we add two exclamation points in front, that will add a secondary heading. I'll go ahead and do this for each of the different headings that I have got here. Both for Hypothesis, Proposed Method, Current Research Papers, and Sample Data Table. I will preview this so we can see what the results look like. Here, we have got the box and the bolded heading for Hypothesis, Proposed Method, Current Research Papers, and Sample Data. Things are looking better already. Let's go ahead and scroll down a little bit, and now we want to make our Acropora palmata or depending on where you are at in the world, Acrop-ra palmata, show up in Italics.

To do this, we simply add two single quotes at the beginning and at the end of the phrase Acropora palmata. Now when we preview this page and we look, we can see that Acropora palmata is showing up in Italics. Let's go ahead and create a link to an outside web resource. In this case, we want to link to outside web pages that are showing all the current research related to a particular topic. In this case, we'll open a new tab in our browser by hitting Command+T or Ctrl+T. If you are using a browser other than Firefox, this may be a different keyboard command.

Next, I'll go to scholar.google.com. Here, I'll do a search for coral polyp density and depth, because that's the topic that we are working with. I'll go ahead and click the Search button and I can see that I have got 2,730 results. That's a lot of results. Let's just look for the recent articles that have been published this year. To do this, I'll go ahead and click on the link for recent articles. Now I'm down to 791. Well, that's all of the articles that have been published using those keywords since 2004. But if I click the dropdown menu here and change this since 2009, now I have only got 39 articles. Much more manageable.

To create the link to this page, I'll go ahead and select the complete URL that has all the results in the window that we want to use and then hit Command+C or Ctrl+C on my keyboard to copy that to my clipboard. I'll then jump back over to the tab where my Wiki is and scroll down in the page to where I can edit the content. At the end of the line for Current Research Papers, I'll hit Enter or Return. Now we have already seen that you create a link by putting a left-hand square bracket. The thing that you want to link to, in this case I'll just hit Command+V or Ctrl+V to paste in the complete URL and then put a right-hand square bracket. But before we go ahead and preview this, there is something else we need to do. We need to come up here to the very beginning of this link and just inside of the left-hand square bracket we'll type in the text that we want to be the link.

In this case, we want to type in Current Research Papers. I'll then type in a space and enter in the pipe character or the vertical bar that's often times Shift and the key above your Return key on your keyboard. You may have to look around to find this key on your keyboard if it's in a different place on your particular keyboard. Now when we preview this page, we can see that we have a link to Current Research Papers. Let's go ahead and save this page before we actually click on the link though. So we'll click the Save button and we are taken into the View menu for this page. I'll click the link Current Research Papers and we can see that the page is refreshed directly to Google Scholar with the parameters that we set in showing the 39 articles that we wanted to show.

I will go ahead and click the Back button in my browser and now we are back inside of our Wiki. I'm going to click the Edit tab and the last thing we want to do is add a Sample Data Table to the bottom of this page. To do this, I'll simply come down to the bottom of my page, where I have got the Sample Data Table listing, hit Enter or Return a couple of times, so I have got a nice clean line to start working on. Now to create a table, you do this with the pipe characters that we typed when we were creating the link. So let's begin with a pipe character and then type in Depth | Number of Polyps | Temperature (C) | Salinity | PAR |. That's going to establish the first row our table. I'll hit Enter or Return and now we can start creating the data that's going to go underneath of that first row.

We need to make sure that we have the same number of pipe characters in each line of text. So we'll type in the first one | m | for 1 meter |, and then four more pipe characters separated by spaces. Let's go ahead and preview this document to make sure we are going down the right path. I'll hit the Preview button and now as I scroll down, I can see that I've got my table and its setup right. The right-hand side is showing this extra column.

Don't worry about that. That will disappear after we go ahead and save the page. So let's scroll back down to the bottom of the page and scroll to the bottom of our text window. Now instead of typing the same line over and over for all the different numbers to show the depth between one and five meters, I'll simply select the entire row, copy it with Command+C or Ctrl+C, then hit Enter or Return, paste with Command+V or Ctrl+V and repeat that process several times until I have the right number of lines.

Now I can simply go in and just make the edits to 2 meters, 3 meters, 4 meters, and 5 meters. When I click the Save button, now we have our Italicized text showing up properly. We have a link to Google Scholar and our Sample Data Table is looking great. Let's add one more thing. Let's show you how to add an image into your Wiki page. To do this, go ahead and click the Edit tab, so we are ready to begin editing more content inside of here. We'll then scroll all the way down to the bottom and just past our Sample Data Table, we'll hit Enter or Return a few times and we'll type in Image of Experimental Design.

We will go ahead and make that a heading two by putting two exclamation points at the beginning of the line and then save that text. So we scroll down, we can see that the area is setup for us to add our image. Next, we'll have to use a trick. We are going to go over here to the Attachments tab and here we can browse and find an image that we want to attach. Out on my Desktop, I have got an image called method.jpg. I'll go ahead and click the Open button and then click the button for File Upload. The image uploads.

Let's go ahead and preview the image that we opened up. To do this, simply click on the link to the image. The image is going to attempt to download back to our machine. We can go ahead and click OK. The file will download and we can simply double-click to open up the image. The image was captured by our group when we were sitting down in the classroom and we were drafting out the ideas for how we are going to conduct our experiment. We drew it out on the chalkboard and then used one of our digital cameras to take a picture of the board. Now we want to add this particular image directly inline inside of our Wiki.

To do this, let's go ahead and simply close both of these windows and then we'll right-click or Ctrl-click on the link to this file, and select Copy Link Location. Next, we'll go back over to the Edit tab and scroll down in the window until we get to the line where we have our image of experimental design. We then simply put a left-hand bracket and then paste with Command+V or Ctrl+V to paste in the complete URL that we just copied for the image that we uploaded and then close this link with a right-hand square bracket.

Now when we save this page and we scroll down in the window, we are now able to see the image displayed directly in line inside of our Wiki. This is a great little tool for you to use in order to add images directly inline inside of your Wiki. Otherwise, there are a couple of other ways to add images, some of which may or may not work on a particular Moodle system that you are working on. But this one seems to work on most of the systems. To return back to the name page of our Wiki and to check our work, we can scroll all the way to the bottom of the page and click on the link for Research Project Wiki. Now we have our Research Project Wiki where we have got the Packing List for all of the items that we are going to take with us on our field trip or we can return back to the main page and click on the link for our Coral Group where we have got our text that's formatted, links to outside web sites, data tables and we have even added a picture that shows our experimental design that we have captured off of our digital camera or cellphone.

Let's go ahead and return back to the main course by clicking on Biology432 in the upper left-hand corner on my screen.

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