Maya Particle Effects
Illustration by John Hersey

Maya Particle Effects

with Audri Phillips

Video: Creating collisions and events

In this scene, we are going to explore the Collision Event Editor and making particles collide with geometries. I'll start the scene going and you can see these little cloud particles go right through the plane. Now I am going to pick the particles and I am going to pick the plane and I am going to go Particles > Make Collide. Now let's see what happens. Look at that. Isn't that cute? The particles bounce off that plane and they are still going through, obviously, the other second plane back here.

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Watch the Online Video Course Maya Particle Effects
2h 8m Intermediate Jun 11, 2009

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

Particle effects can be used to create everything from realistic smoke and light to abstract design elements. In Maya Particle Effects, Audri Phillips demonstrates the particles she has found helpful in her work creating dynamic visuals for video games,film and fine art. This course goes deeper than the basics, tackling topics like saving time by reusing MEL expressions, implementing physics to create realistic effects, and manipulating paint effects to give particles the look and feel of an envisioned design. Exercise files accompany the course.

Topics include:
  • Working with particle emitters and fields
  • Instancing paint effects and geometry to particles
  • Using Maya particles to produce graphic design elements
  • Using the relationship editor, creating particle collisions and collision events
  • Creating realistic effects such as smoke by emulating real life physics
  • Rendering and exporting final projects
Subject:
3D + Animation
Software:
Maya
Author:
Audri Phillips

Creating collisions and events

In this scene, we are going to explore the Collision Event Editor and making particles collide with geometries. I'll start the scene going and you can see these little cloud particles go right through the plane. Now I am going to pick the particles and I am going to pick the plane and I am going to go Particles > Make Collide. Now let's see what happens. Look at that. Isn't that cute? The particles bounce off that plane and they are still going through, obviously, the other second plane back here.

I am going to open up the Attribute Editor for a minute and there is something called the geoConnector1. This has the Resilience. If I turn the Resilience way down, let's see what happens now when they collide. Far less bouncy. And I can add Friction as well, which will kind of drag them down too. But as I put the Resilience up, you see they get more and more bouncy until they are at full bounciness at 1.

The next thing I am going to do is I am going to open up the Particles > Particle Collision Event Editor. particle 1 is selected in the Objects. I am going to have an event type. What I want to have happen is when these particles hit this plane here I want them to emit a particle. So I am going to say Emit. I could choose Split so that when they hit here, if I chose Split, they would split and I could have any numerous number of particles. I could make it split in three particles that pop-off this particle when they hit the wall.

But we will stick to Emit for now. And each particle will only emit 1 particle. Spread 0.5. That's fine. Inherit velocity 1. That means the new particles that are created that emit from this particle when it hits the plane, it will inherit the velocity of this particle. And I can say the Original Particle Dies, which would be these cloud particles would die and only the emitted particles will remain. But for now I am not going to, I am going to have the original particle live. And let's see what happens when we create the event. It's called event0, let's play it.

Look at that! Isn't that cute? Now I would like these particles right here, these new particles that have been created, particle2 to bounce off this wall when they hit it. So I am going to hit the particle2, select this plane right here and I am going to go Particles > Make Collide. So now let's see what happens. So they are bouncing off when they hit that plane as well. So if you can see a little better, they bounce off too.

Okay, now I want to have a new event happen. Let's open our Particle Collision Event Editor. I am going to select particle2 because particle2 is what I want to have an event for. And I am going to have them Split when they hit here. And the number of particles, let's have it 3. We are going live dangerously. The Target particle is particle3 because I don't want the Target particle to be particle2. That's a particle that I am working with. I want it to be a brand new particle when these particles collide with this plane here. I will let them inherit the velocity at 1. Set event name, I am going to call event1.

And I am going to go Create Event. I hope this all works out and like you can see that when these particles hit, they are bouncing off and creating even more particles. And let's illustrate that better. We are going to show this new particle that's been made particle3. Go into here and particle3Shape, it's now a Point. Let's make it Blobby. Wow! Look at that. Current Render Type, let's bring down the Radius of Blobby a bit to that. Let's turn this way so we get a better view of what's happening. Okay, those particle hit, those bounce off. And those every time they hit, look three particles come off of them each time they hit right there. Kind of fun.

Now I can always go back into the Particles Collision Event Editor and selecting that event, particle3, I can say I don't want 3 particles to split off. I want 5. And I don't even have to do anything. Do it again and now we will have 5 particles being created every time they hit. Let's go for 10. See if we can push it here to 10, do it again. Look at that. Kind of a flowering of particles when they hit. I will go back. 3 is plenty.

And I can even change the particle1 event, event0. Now I can go back and edit that and I can have that original particle die. So I am going to play some more with that. So the original particle die, so notice they are dying off, and all the emitted particles are showing. And I can re-edit it again and not have the original particle die, and so we are back to them bouncing off as well.

So you can see this Particle Collision Event Editor is very useful. Once you have made a particle collide with a piece of geometry, you can make something happen when that event happens and you can do that with this Particle Collision Event.

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