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Mac OS X Mountain Lion New Features
Illustration by Neil Webb

Exploring Auto Save improvements


From:

Mac OS X Mountain Lion New Features

with Christopher Breen

Video: Exploring Auto Save improvements

In Mac OS X Lion Essential Training, I showed you how the AutoSave feature works. With Mountain Lion Apple has enhanced this feature in a few ways. We'll take a look by launching TextEdit, and I am going to create a new document. What you see here is the iCloud interface for TextEdit. This is something we're going to look at in another movie. For now, I'll just simply click on New Document and I'll begin typing. Note that when I begin typing the title's document changes from Untitled to Untitled -- Edited. This indicates that the AutoSave feature is on the case.

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Mac OS X Mountain Lion New Features
1h 13m Appropriate for all Aug 16, 2012

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

In this course, author Christopher Breen examines Mac OS X Mountain Lion, the latest version of the Apple operating system. The course takes a look at the enhancements to messages, contacts, calendars, mail, Safari, and expanded iCloud remote storage options, as well as brand-new features such as AirPlay mirroring, which makes it simple to wirelessly project your Mac screen onto an Apple TV–connected television, the Game Center app, Dictation, and Gatekeeper security protections.

Topics include:
  • Setting up your computer quickly with the guided setup process
  • Using Dictation to turn your spoken words into text
  • Taking advantage of the Auto Save improvements
  • Sharing data with iCloud
  • Mirroring your Mac to a television
  • Creating to-do events with Reminders
  • Keeping track of game progress with Game Center
  • Browsing with the improved Safari
  • Becoming familiar with the Power Nap and new privacy features
Subjects:
Business Operating Systems
Software:
Mac OS X
Author:
Christopher Breen

Exploring Auto Save improvements

In Mac OS X Lion Essential Training, I showed you how the AutoSave feature works. With Mountain Lion Apple has enhanced this feature in a few ways. We'll take a look by launching TextEdit, and I am going to create a new document. What you see here is the iCloud interface for TextEdit. This is something we're going to look at in another movie. For now, I'll just simply click on New Document and I'll begin typing. Note that when I begin typing the title's document changes from Untitled to Untitled -- Edited. This indicates that the AutoSave feature is on the case.

Now I'm going to save my document, and I'm going to call it Test. When I do that you'll see that the default location for saving that file is iCloud, Apple's online syncing and storage service. If I click on the Where menu, I have the option to Save the file on my Mac--for example, the Documents folder--rather than on iCloud. For the time being, I'm going to save it to iCloud. And to do that, all I have to do is click on Save. Now let's see what we can do with it. Bring my cursor up and here is the triangle.

I click on that triangle and I have options to Rename, Move To, Duplicate, Lock, or I can Browse All Versions. For now I'm going to choose Rename. If I do that, I can rename the document right here within the document. And press Return, and I now have a new name for my document. I can also choose Move To. Currently, it's in iCloud, but I can move it to my Documents folder or on my Mac for example. And I click on Move and now it's been moved to my Documents folder.

Note that when I do that it really is moved. It's deleted from iCloud and stored on my Mac. Well, let's say I want to put it back on iCloud. Can I do that? Well, let's go find out. Click on the triangle and sure enough, I can choose to move it back to iCloud. Or if I choose Move To, I can store it somewhere else on my Mac. I'm going to put it back on iCloud. Move Document and now it's back on iCloud. And it's the same time it's no longer on my Mac. The Duplicate command, which was first used in Lion, serves the same purpose.

You end up making another copy of the document. And of course you can also choose to lock the document. I don't wish to do that right now, so I'm going to unlock it, and now it's unlocked. Now I'm going to add a little bit more text, and I'll allow that correction to happen simply by pressing on the Return key. Now I haven't saved the document. Let's see what's in the menu now. I now have the option to revert to the last saved version, because I haven't saved the document, so I'll choose that.

I really do want to revert, and that extra line of text is now gone. And we add some again, and this time I'll save by pressing Command+S. Now let's see what's in the menu at the bottom, Browse All Versions. As I showed you in Lion Essential Training, when you choose the command this is what happens. You get this Time-Machine-like interface, and using it you can go back in time to find other versions of your document. To restore it to this old version for example, I would click on Restore, and here's my document.

Lastly, a feature that many old- time Mac users will be thrilled to see. Now when you click on the File menu, you'll see the usual stuff that you saw in Lion. Now let's take a look at the Duplicate command. In versions of the Mac OS prior to Lion, this said Save As, and it's a command that a lot of people missed. You can now restore. All you have to do is hold down the Option key and that changes to Save As, or you can press Shift+Command+Option+S. If you're new to the Mac this may not seem like a big deal, but to us old timers it's a blessing, as we find Save As a more functional command.

In order for AutoSave to work, applications must be written specifically to support it. As you've seen, Apple's TextEdit does so. The iWork applications, which are Pages, Numbers, and Keynote, do so as well. Regrettably, as of this record, Microsoft Office applications, however, don't. And there you have it, AutoSave under Mountain Lion.

There are currently no FAQs about Mac OS X Mountain Lion New Features.

 
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