Switching from Windows to Mac (2008)
Illustration by Don Barnett
Watching:

Demystifying the Mac


From:

Switching from Windows to Mac (2008)

with David Rivers

Video: Demystifying the Mac

This title is all about switching to the Mac from a Windows PC. So in this lesson we are going to explore the advantages of doing so, while we bust a few myths that may have you feeling a little bit hesitant to switch right now. If you have already committed to the switch, this lesson should make you feel good about your decision, but if you are still on the fence, this lesson might just knock you off the fence and into Mac territory. Firstly, let's discuss some of the top excuses out there for putting off the switch to the Mac. For the most part these are not great reasons, but rather weak excuses.
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  1. 20m 38s
    1. Welcome
      2m 42s
    2. Demystifying the Mac
      7m 35s
    3. Adjusting to new terminology
      10m 21s
  2. 17m 9s
    1. Gains and losses
      6m 40s
    2. Keyboard basics
      6m 57s
    3. Mouse basics
      3m 32s
  3. 56m 0s
    1. The desktop
      8m 15s
    2. The omnipresent Apple menu
      7m 31s
    3. The Dock
      14m 15s
    4. The Dashboard
      7m 1s
    5. The Extras menu
      4m 13s
    6. Windows and window controls
      8m 9s
    7. Working with disks
      6m 36s
  4. 54m 18s
    1. Window views
      11m 29s
    2. Using Quick Look
      9m 1s
    3. The Finder toolbar
      6m 9s
    4. Working with icons
      4m 41s
    5. Using color labels
      6m 32s
    6. Using the Trash
      5m 20s
    7. Using Get Info
      11m 6s
  5. 16m 43s
    1. Working with the Spotlight menu
      5m 30s
    2. Using the Spotlight window
      6m 1s
    3. Customizing Spotlight
      5m 12s
  6. 34m 24s
    1. Opening and manipulating applications
      7m 24s
    2. Using Exposé
      4m 46s
    3. Using Spaces
      11m 8s
    4. The Save and Open dialogs
      6m 41s
    5. Creating web clip widgets
      4m 25s
  7. 59m 7s
    1. Installing applications
      9m 5s
    2. .sit vs. .zip files
      5m 53s
    3. Third-party options for transferring files from a PC
      6m 30s
    4. Using drives to transfer files from a PC
      7m 44s
    5. Online methods for transferring files from a PC
      11m 27s
    6. Transferring mail and address books
      8m 49s
    7. Setting up individual accounts
      9m 39s
  8. 51m 11s
    1. Printers and printouts
      7m 29s
    2. Faxing on the Mac
      8m 33s
    3. Digital cameras and video cameras
      10m 35s
    4. Burning CDs and DVDs
      9m 21s
    5. Other peripherals
      7m 38s
    6. Using Time Machine
      7m 35s
  9. 32m 49s
    1. Using Mail
      6m 6s
    2. RSS feeds
      4m 25s
    3. Safari basics
      6m 48s
    4. iChat basics
      6m 46s
    5. iDisk basics
      8m 44s
  10. 32m 37s
    1. Customizing appearance settings
      11m 14s
    2. Adjusting the date and time
      5m 37s
    3. Sound options
      4m 46s
    4. Energy-saving preferences
      6m 49s
    5. Spotlight preferences
      4m 11s
  11. 12m 7s
    1. Configuring Boot Camp
      5m 48s
    2. Using Boot Camp
      4m 12s
    3. Other options
      2m 7s
  12. 1h 35m
    1. iCal
      11m 6s
    2. Photo Booth
      8m 31s
    3. TextEdit
      8m 58s
    4. Preview
      8m 29s
    5. Dictionary
      6m 17s
    6. Stickies
      7m 26s
    7. iTunes
      12m 3s
    8. iPhoto
      13m 19s
    9. iMovie
      12m 49s
    10. iDVD
      6m 46s
  13. 28s
    1. Goodbye
      28s

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Watch the Online Video Course Switching from Windows to Mac (2008)
7h 57m Intermediate Jul 11, 2008

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

Windows users who are contemplating a change to the Mac might have a number of questions. What exactly will be gained and lost in the transition? What is involved in the actual transfer of an entire digital life? How can familiar workflows be recreated in the new environment? Instructor David Rivers answers all these questions, and many more, in Switching from Windows to the Mac. Unlike other basic Mac instruction, this course focuses on the similarities and differences between the two operating systems. David takes care to highlight the terminology and interface differences that can initially be mystifying for Windows users. He explores not only the software--Mac OS X Leopard and its bundled applications--but also important hardware subjects, like keyboard and mouse differences, and how to work with cameras and other peripherals. David also discusses how to run Windows on a Mac using Boot Camp or virtualization. Example files accompany the course.

Topics include:
  • Using the desktop, Apple menu, Dock, and Dashboard
  • Navigating with the Finder
  • Searching with Spotlight
  • Backing up with Time Machine
  • Staying organized with Exposé and Spaces
  • Getting online with Mail, Safari, iChat, and more
  • Customizing system preferences
  • Moving Day: installing applications and transferring files, email, and contacts
  • Exploring ten fun programs included with the Mac
Subject:
Business
Software:
Mac OS X
Author:
David Rivers

Demystifying the Mac

This title is all about switching to the Mac from a Windows PC. So in this lesson we are going to explore the advantages of doing so, while we bust a few myths that may have you feeling a little bit hesitant to switch right now. If you have already committed to the switch, this lesson should make you feel good about your decision, but if you are still on the fence, this lesson might just knock you off the fence and into Mac territory. Firstly, let's discuss some of the top excuses out there for putting off the switch to the Mac. For the most part these are not great reasons, but rather weak excuses.

For example, Mac computers are too expensive. Well yeah, you can spend about 300 bucks for a cheap Windows computer, but the keyword there is cheap. Most brand name PCs configured like a standard Mac will cost about the same amount of money. If you already have a suitable keyboard, mouse, and a monitor, you could spend less than $600 for an ample and totally sufficient Mac. If you are more concerned about the total cost of ownership and the quality of your computer, as opposed to just the initial purchase prize, the Mac wins hands down.

Alright, how about this one: there is less software available for the Mac. True. Some highly customized software applications are only written for Windows, and you may have fewer choices for equivalents that run on the Mac, but there are thousands of software applications available for the Mac that meet the needs of most users very well. Also, there are tons of great software applications that only run on the Mac. The Mac comes with many strong Apple applications, doing all sorts of things, like running email, instant messaging, organizing your photos and your music. Ever heard of iTunes? Well, there is that and a whole lot more.

We get into a bunch of these throughout this title, including my top-ten free fun programs that you get with your Mac. The Mac OS X is based on the UNIX platform, so many programs that run in a UNIX or a LINUX environment will also run on your Mac, not necessarily on your Windows PC. Of course, if you must have Windows, it doesn't mean that you must have a Windows PC. Windows too can run on your Mac. Now, there are a number of methods for making this happen, including virtualization software for running Windows apps, right from your Mac desktop, and a program called Boot Camp that will let you choose whether to boot up your Mac in a Windows or a Mac OS X environment.

I use Boot Camp, and I love how I can share content between both Windows and Mac environments. Alright, next excuse: the Mac won't last. Well, that's not true. Although it may have appeared that way over ten years ago. Since those less popular days, Mac sales are actually now on the rise, more than half by former Windows users. How about that? Don't be fooled by overall sales, which is around 8%. This includes the corporate world and things like cash registers that run on Windows; you will find those in retail outlets, for example in restaurants.

Mac sales in the consumer market are actually over 20% and climbing. Okay. How about Macs don't comply with industry standards and they are not expandable? Not any more. Let's start with expandability. Although the high end Mac Pro does have expansion slots, you rarely need them, thanks to FireWire and USB ports that allow you to connect devices without ever even opening the box. Now once upon a time Mac floppy disks wouldn't run on a Windows PC.

That's where noncompliance with industry standards ended. Apple actually popularized industry standards like Wi-Fi, wireless networking, and USB ports, and is compliant with such standards found on Bluetooth, PCI Express, FireWire, Gigabit Ethernet, and even Intel Ppocessor technologies, just to name a few. In fact, Apple's default web browser, known as Safari- available for Windows too by the way- complies with industry standards even better than Microsoft's Internet Explorer.

Alright, now it's time to explore some of the advantages to moving to a Mac. One-stop shop. Think about Windows for a second. It has to be able to run all kinds of PCs from all kinds of different vendors, and the people who make Mac OS X, also make the computers it runs on. This is called Vertical Integration, and it means a huge benefit to customers who can now count on a reliable system, as well as reliable service, all from the same place.

If you have an issue with your computer or your operating system, you call Apple. One contact. Of course, they have a strong incentive to resolve the issue. There is no one else to blame. Alright, how about then looks? Hmm-hm. Macs look cool, and whether it's an iMac or an iPod, the people at Apple are serious about aesthetics. This is proven by the numerous awards that they have received for excellence in industrial design. With the Mac, function follows form, and you can judge this book by its cover.

Quality design means having to keep the important features and scrapping the unnecessary junk. Easy on the eyes is nice, but easy to learn and easy to work with are the real goals here of the Mac designers. How about high quality products? Apple invests seriously in developing unique products that are superior to those that might be interchangeable with others sold by a bunch of different vendors. You get what you pay for. Paying a little bit more for a lot more functionality is what makes Apple the most profitable company in the industry, unit for unit.

Alright, innovative and compatible. Apple and Intel are partners and now all Macs use Intel processor chip, so watch for some new and unique innovations from Intel now that it doesn't have to rely solely on Microsoft Windows based computers. Microsoft Office 2008 for the Mac? Yeah, its out now, and its the same Office Suite you may be used to using on your Windows PC. Take Word, Excel, and PowerPoint files created on a PC, and open them up on your Mac. No conversion required.

Alright, just in conclusion, truth be told, I was reluctant to switch to the Mac. I was a victim of some of those misconceptions I talked about. I was simply ignorant of the advantages, to be honest. I was comfortable in my PC world using Windows, the Mac was foreign to me. To me switching would be like learning a new language, when I could get by just fine using English, thank you very much. Even if it meant putting up with a few bugs, the odd virus, and a computer that got a little slower every day.

Well, little did I know how easy the switch to the Mac would actually be. I just needed a few fundamentals revealed to me and the rest was a breeze. Well, that's what you can expect in the upcoming lessons. By the end of this title, you will know what you have been missing, and you will wonder why you didn't make the switch sooner. I will never forget my first day with the Mac. I turned the switch to on, and it was ready to use in seconds. Seconds, not minutes of flashing screens and chugging hard drives. Seconds. That's how long it took for me to get hooked.

So let's see how long it takes you. In the next lesson, we get acquainted with some of the new terminology associated with the Mac, and its Windows equivalent.

Find answers to the most frequently asked questions about Switching from Windows to Mac (2008) .


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Q: This course was updated on 5/02/2012. Can you tell me what changed?
A: This course has been updated for Mac OS X Lion. We've also added new movies on getting your Mac online, working with the system preferences, connecting to devices such as printers and cameras, and David's favorite free "apps" or applications for the Mac.
 
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