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Creating reverb digitally via algorithms and convolution

From: Foundations of Audio: Reverb

Video: Creating reverb digitally via algorithms and convolution

There are so many different methods used for creating Studio reverb. Room tracks and chambers are acoustic sources of reverb, springs and plates give us reverb mechanically, but we're not done, there are digital ways too. Digital reverbs come in two forms, algorithmic reverb, which is the type of reverb plug-in in your DAW. And convolution, which takes advantage of the ever-growing power of CPUs to bring us another form of digital reverb. You'll hear examples of these types of reverbs throughout this course.

Creating reverb digitally via algorithms and convolution

There are so many different methods used for creating Studio reverb. Room tracks and chambers are acoustic sources of reverb, springs and plates give us reverb mechanically, but we're not done, there are digital ways too. Digital reverbs come in two forms, algorithmic reverb, which is the type of reverb plug-in in your DAW. And convolution, which takes advantage of the ever-growing power of CPUs to bring us another form of digital reverb. You'll hear examples of these types of reverbs throughout this course.

We'll take them in order, in an earlier movie we saw how reverb comes from countless room reflections that follow any sound made in a room. In fact, those reflections that make up reverberation could be created in your DAW using a bunch of delays. One of the first digital reverbs ever was created in 1962 by a clever chap named Manfred Schroeter working at Bell Labs and he used just six delays. Today's digital reverbs of course use many, many more.

Algorithmic digital reverbs are simply tricked out digital delay lines. The high-end outboard digital reverbs from Bert Caskey, Lexicon, TC Electronic, and Yamaha use algorithms consisting of very elaborate networks of interconnected, re-circulating, modulating, and filter delays. Many, many different digital delays are combined--intertwined really--so that the sound that goes in is sustained and repeated in a richly complex pattern, very much inspired by room acoustics.

What a Concert Hall does with countless reflecting surfaces and algorithmic reverb can do with a large, but finite number of delay lines. The number of delays within the delay time settings of each, the way they're connected to each other feeding back and feeding forward with their delay times modulated, their phase shifted, their spectral content manipulated, built of process delays, multiple process delays and algorithmic reverb is a complex digital system that resonates, the signal goes in and lingers and fades.

The sound quality of this kind of digital reverb depends very much on the skills of the engineers who design and write the code and seems to be directly proportional to the digital algorithms complexity. So these reverbs are greedy users of hardware needed to do all the calculations. Outboard digital reverbs have hardware dedicated to the task. Plug-in reverbs, especially the best sounding plug-ins, will gobble up a significant share of your DAW's system resources. There are great sounding plug in reverbs for sure, but you'll do well to have a very fast multi-core CPU with quite a big chunk of RAM to handle them.

Memory and calculation intense, algorithmic reverb is one of the most important places to consider reaching for a dedicated outboard unit. Convolution offers an alternative digital approach to the algorithmic reverb. This curious word convolution simply refers to a very specific mathematical operation. Leveraging that kind of math lets us take the impulse response of a room and apply it to any audio track we have. Again, as reverb is in essence that almost indescribable, complicated, organic pattern of decaying reflections from all the room surfaces, all we need is a way to find the necessary pattern of delays and apply them to our audio.

This is done by sending an impulse into the room, a simple single instantaneous spike of energy, a perfect click, and recording the resulting pattern of spikes that follow. This recorded response of the reverberant room as it reacts to a simple spike gives us all the data we need to apply the room's response to any other signal, your vocal track, your snare, your ukulele. Convolution reverb is driven then by a library of impulse responses, those recordings of how space is reacted to an impulse.

The impulse response might be a hall in Japan, while your track is a close miked vocal from your bedroom. Convolve your vocal track with this impulse response and your listeners will hear your vocalist sonically transported to a space you may never have been. Convolution is a relatively new tool in audio, not because the idea is new, it isn't, but because it's very computationally intense. Convolution didn't really become viable in the studio environment until CPUs became multi-core, clock speed broke through the gigahertz range, and RAM started being sold by the gigabyte.

We're lucky to be alive in audio today, because such capability is readily available. Convolution joins algorithmic to give all of us two very powerful choices for creating studio reverb digitally.

Show transcript

This video is part of

Image for Foundations of Audio: Reverb
Foundations of Audio: Reverb

39 video lessons · 8183 viewers

Alex U. Case
Author

 
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  1. 9m 41s
    1. Welcome
      1m 58s
    2. What you need to know before watching this course
      2m 18s
    3. Songs you should listen to while watching this course
      2m 46s
    4. Using the exercise files
      55s
    5. Using the Get in the Mix session files
      1m 44s
  2. 6m 44s
    1. What is reverb?
      2m 35s
    2. Why do we use reverb?
      4m 9s
  3. 24m 33s
    1. Capturing reverb acoustically through room tracks
      5m 33s
    2. Creating reverb acoustically through a reverb chamber
      2m 51s
    3. Creating reverb mechanically using springs and plates
      5m 8s
    4. Creating reverb digitally via algorithms and convolution
      4m 51s
    5. Optimizing signal flow, effects loops, and CPU resources
      6m 10s
  4. 39m 10s
    1. The anatomy of reverberation
      3m 8s
    2. Mastering reverb time, predelay, and wet/dry mix parameters
      5m 36s
    3. Understanding the frequency dependence of reverberation
      4m 56s
    4. Tapping into advanced parameters such as diffusion, density, and more
      4m 37s
    5. Reference values from the best orchestra halls
      5m 40s
    6. Hearing beyond the basic parameters
      5m 31s
    7. Touring the interfaces for six reverb plugins
      9m 42s
  5. 1h 32m
    1. Choosing the right reverb for each of your tracks
      2m 17s
    2. Simulating space with reverb
      5m 42s
    3. Hearing space in the mix
      6m 33s
    4. Timbre and texture
      3m 36s
    5. Shaping tone and timbre with reverb
      5m 49s
    6. Creating contrasting sounds for your tracks
      4m 43s
    7. Using nonlinear reverb to help a track cut through
      4m 25s
    8. Emphasizing the reverb using predelay
      3m 24s
    9. Strategically blurring and obscuring tracks
      1m 46s
    10. Get in the Mix: Changing the scene by changing reverb
      7m 37s
    11. Get in the Mix: Gating reverb to emphasize any track in your production
      5m 52s
    12. Reversing reverb to highlight musical moments
      9m 36s
    13. Synthesizing new sounds through reverb
      6m 42s
    14. Get in the Mix: Supporting a track with regenerative reverb
      6m 31s
    15. Getting the most out of room tracks
      17m 39s
  6. 11m 32s
    1. Setting up your own reverb chamber: The architecture
      2m 2s
    2. Setting up your own reverb chamber: The audio
      4m 8s
    3. Using convolution correctly
      2m 32s
    4. Getting great impluse response
      2m 50s
  7. 1m 29s
    1. Next steps
      1m 29s

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