Start learning with our library of video tutorials taught by experts. Get started

Lightroom 5 Essentials: 02 Managing Images with the Library Module

Why use DNG?


From:

Lightroom 5 Essentials: 02 Managing Images with the Library Module

with Chris Orwig

Video: Why use DNG?

There's a lot of excitement surrounding Lightroom and how Lightroom is this tool that we can use in order to raw process our photographs. There's also a lot of excitement about how we can capture raw images when we're using digital cameras. Yet sometimes all of this excitement can be a little bit confusing. It can be a little bit hard to different between the hype and also the legitimate excitement. And on top of that, when we're working in RAW, we have these different file formats. And so what I want to do here is take a couple of minutes just to deconstruct things.
Expand all | Collapse all
  1. 2m 32s
    1. Welcome
      1m 54s
    2. Using the exercise files
      38s
  2. 22m 0s
    1. Working with flags, stars, and labels
      3m 52s
    2. Adding flags, stars, and labels more quickly
      5m 10s
    3. Using Auto Advance to speed up rating photos
      4m 44s
    4. Rating and ranking groups of photos
      1m 50s
    5. Rating and ranking in the Grid and full-screen modes
      4m 5s
    6. Quickly delete rejected photos
      2m 19s
  3. 14m 0s
    1. Filtering by flag, stars, and labels
      3m 44s
    2. Filtering by still photos, virtual copies, and video files
      1m 51s
    3. Filtering by text, metadata, and file type
      3m 3s
    4. Sorting photos
      2m 30s
    5. Stacking photos into groups
      2m 52s
  4. 18m 14s
    1. What is a collection?
      2m 36s
    2. Creating a collection to group images together
      4m 35s
    3. Creating targeted collections
      2m 50s
    4. Using Quick Collections
      2m 42s
    5. Using Smart Collections
      5m 31s
  5. 10m 49s
    1. Overview of the new Map module
      2m 47s
    2. Tagging images with locations
      3m 21s
    3. Creating saved locations
      4m 41s
  6. 11m 10s
    1. Using Quick Develop
      4m 39s
    2. Synchronizing settings
      3m 58s
    3. Making incremental adjustments to images
      2m 33s
  7. 15m 54s
    1. Playing video in Lightroom
      2m 40s
    2. Trimming a video
      3m 47s
    3. Editing the color and tone of a video
      5m 21s
    4. Setting the poster frame
      1m 54s
    5. Capturing a still image from a video
      2m 12s
  8. 11m 1s
    1. Exporting to a hard drive
      3m 29s
    2. Publishing to a hard drive
      4m 18s
    3. Publishing video to Facebook
      3m 14s
  9. 18m 55s
    1. Why use DNG?
      7m 32s
    2. Using Fast Load DNG
      5m 0s
    3. Saving size with Lossy DNG
      6m 23s
  10. 27m 56s
    1. Adding keywords
      6m 3s
    2. Creating and using keyword sets
      3m 35s
    3. Synchronizing keywords
      2m 13s
    4. Keywording with the Painter tool
      3m 4s
    5. Working with the Metadata panel
      4m 24s
    6. Adding copyright metadata with a template
      4m 36s
    7. Filtering photographs based on metadata
      4m 1s
  11. 31m 0s
    1. External editing preferences
      4m 23s
    2. Editing raw photos in Photoshop
      6m 15s
    3. Editing an original TIFF or PSD
      4m 30s
    4. Editing an original JPEG
      5m 36s
    5. Editing a modified TIFF, PSD, or JPEG file in Photoshop
      4m 3s
    6. Opening an image as a Smart Object in Photoshop
      3m 16s
    7. Including multiple images in Photoshop as layers
      2m 57s
  12. 27m 40s
    1. Exporting photographs to a hard drive, CD, or DVD
      5m 51s
    2. Exporting photographs with previously used settings
      1m 32s
    3. Creating and using exporting presets
      3m 45s
    4. Emailing photographs from Lightroom
      6m 40s
    5. Using Publish Services to export photographs to a folder
      5m 16s
    6. Uploading photos to Facebook and Flickr
      4m 36s
  13. 40s
    1. Next steps
      40s

Watch this entire course now—plus get access to every course in the library. Each course includes high-quality videos taught by expert instructors.

Become a member
Please wait...
Lightroom 5 Essentials: 02 Managing Images with the Library Module
3h 31m Beginner Jul 02, 2013

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

In part two of Chris Orwig's Lightroom Essentials, you'll learn how to add important metadata to your images that will help you find and filter your library, process images and video, and export, email, and share photos—all from within the powerful Library module in Adobe Lightroom. First you'll learn how to flag, rate, and rank your photos and use the information to find images that match those criteria. Then tag them with locations and add keywords and identifying information that clearly distinguish the subject and your copyright. Chris also shows you how to make image adjustments with Quick Develop, and play, trim, and edit video. Lastly, find out how to export your photographs to a hard drive, email them to friends and clients, and upload them to sharing sites like Flickr and Facebook.

Topics include:
  • Adding flags, stars, and labels to images
  • Filtering your library by text, metadata, and file type
  • Stacking photos into groups
  • Creating a collection to group images
  • Tagging images with locations
  • Processing images in the Library module
  • Viewing and editing videos
  • Working with the DNG file format
  • Adding copyright metadata to photos
  • Adding keywords
  • Opening images in Photoshop
  • Exporting, emailing, and publishing photos
Subjects:
Photography Photo Management Sharing Photos
Software:
Lightroom
Author:
Chris Orwig

Why use DNG?

There's a lot of excitement surrounding Lightroom and how Lightroom is this tool that we can use in order to raw process our photographs. There's also a lot of excitement about how we can capture raw images when we're using digital cameras. Yet sometimes all of this excitement can be a little bit confusing. It can be a little bit hard to different between the hype and also the legitimate excitement. And on top of that, when we're working in RAW, we have these different file formats. And so what I want to do here is take a couple of minutes just to deconstruct things.

And I want to do this for a couple of reasons. First off, so that we have a good working understanding of these issues. And second, so that we can start to understand what it means to work with digital negative files. Okay, well, let's step back for a second and let's start at the beginning. Really, if we go to the beginning, there's two different things we talk about when we're talking about raw. The first is, raw capture, that's images we capture with our cameras. We can set our cameras to capture images in a certain format. The other topic is RAW processing, now this has to do with software, whether we're using Adobe Camera RAW or we're using Lightroom.

So if we go to RAW Capture for a second, what happens is If we have our camera set to JPEG, well, it captures the image, and then it goes through this whole process, and then generates a JPEG. In other words, we've lost some of the data. On the other hand, if we shoot in RAW, we get the image just straight off the sensor. And because of this there, again is a lot of this excitement about RAW. And you may have heard the common saying that you should always be shooting the raw, that you shouldn't shoot in the buff because you might get arrested. Raw captures really great because again we just have all of this data to work with.

All of the information straight off the sensor without anything interpreting it, or messing it up, or modifying it. All right, well what then about raw processing? Well, raw processing is all about taking data, and then it's about applying some sort of set of instructions to that data. Now, it's interesting about these instructions is they're just little lines of text. They say I want this data be interpreted in this particular way. When it comes to Light Room, what happens is all of those instructions are put inside of the catalogue. And the catalogue has all of this information.

Now that information, or those instructions, they allow us to display the actual pixels in a different way, like this image here. And what's great about this is we can be flexible. We can change our mind. Display the image this way or display the image this way. Now, when we're working with raw processing, we can work with all different types of file formats. Whether raw files from the camera, DNG, PSD, TIFF, JPEG, movie files and on and on. So what's interesting about raw processing is it's non-destructive.

In other words we can always change these little instructions. This give us flexibility and speed. There's no need to save the file in the traditional sense, because again all of our work, all of our processing, well it's already just saved by default in these little instruction files. And ultimately this helps us to be more creative, because we can quickly Process out images in different ways. This added flexibility really helps us create more compelling photographs. All right, well let's jump back to a topic I just mentioned, which has to do with this file format issue.

As I mentioned, in Lightroom, we can raw process RAW files, PSD, JPG, TIFF, movie files, DNG files But a lot of the hype and a lot of the excitement is surrounding this whole concept of the DNG file. Now why is that and what is that? What is the DNG? Well the DNG file is something that Adobe came up with, it stands for digital negative, and there are some really clear cut benefits for using this file format. Let me walk you through those.

For starters, if you have a DNG file, by default, the DNG format has what's called lossless compression. In other words, it has a smaller file size without losing any information. And in a sense, what the DNG file format is, it's kind of like a container. You can see this box around this image here. It's almost like that box which then holds the image inside of it. And that box helps us create a little bit of a smaller file size. You can also now change this lossy compression. We'll talk a little more about that in one of the subsequent movies.

This allows us to create a smaller file size and lost information, but some argue that this is better than say, jpeg compression. So again, there's flexibility. Of course we'll need to. Deconstruct these two issues a little more, but for now just know by default, it's lossless. What that means is lots of great information, smaller file size, and for me, I'm all about that. The next thing to consider is this. We can now turn on this option which is called Fast Load. What Fast Load allows us to do in Lightroom is to view and work with these files up to eight times faster in the Develop module. Now this extra added bit of speed, again, is something that's really welcomed. Smaller file size, work more quickly.

It's kind of a no-brainer, right? The othe advantage is that there aren't Sidecar XMP files. Let me jump to another slide to explain this. If we're working with a DNG file, there isn't another file associated with it even if we're saving the metadata to that file. It's all inside of that container. On the other hand, if we have a RAW file like this one here, or a JPEG, or TIFF, or whatever it is, well, it's going to need to have some sort of a sidecar file. The sidecar file will be the set of instructions. These are two separate or distinct files, versus with DNG, well, there aren't any sidecar files at all. Then the last issue is of archival confidence.

A number of Lightroom users use the DNG format simply because of this. This format is open source, meaning anyone can access the information about it. And ideally, the hope is that this will have more archival relevance. In other words lets say you shoot with a particular camera, in a certain raw format and all of a sudden that camera company stops supporting that format or maybe goes out of business, or who knows what. Well then you could run into problems in the future. The DNG format on the other hand well it's supported by Adobe and it's Open source. So that information about the format.

Well it can never be lost. It's already out there and anyone can learn how to access that. So in other words, people use this DNG format in the hopes that this will be an archival type of format. So, again, in my own work flow, I've adopted this DNG format completely. Because of these different reasons. File size, speed. No other need for side car files. And also for confidence of being able to access and work with these files in the future. Now, in your own work flow, you're going to need to make the decision about what file format works best for you. Yet my hope with this movie is that it gives you a little bit of information. For starters, it helps you kind of understand some of the issues surrounding this whole idea of raw processing and raw capture.

It also helps you start to see about some of the benefits of DNG and why you may want to consider using that format. Alright, well, I hope that this movie's been helpful. And now that we have a little bit of a working understanding of Raw and also of DNG. What I want to do in the next couple of movies, is take a look at a couple of examples of how we can work with this DNG format inside of Lightroom.

There are currently no FAQs about Lightroom 5 Essentials: 02 Managing Images with the Library Module.

Share a link to this course
Please wait... Please wait...
Upgrade to get access to exercise files.

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Learn by watching, listening, and doing, Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along Premium memberships include access to all exercise files in the library.
Upgrade now


Exercise files

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

For additional information on downloading and using exercise files, watch our instructional video or read the instructions in the FAQ.

This course includes free exercise files, so you can practice while you watch the course. To access all the exercise files in our library, become a Premium Member.

Upgrade now

Are you sure you want to mark all the videos in this course as unwatched?

This will not affect your course history, your reports, or your certificates of completion for this course.


Mark all as unwatched Cancel

Congratulations

You have completed Lightroom 5 Essentials: 02 Managing Images with the Library Module.

Return to your organization's learning portal to continue training, or close this page.


OK
Become a member to add this course to a playlist

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses—and create as many playlists as you like.

Get started

Already a member?

Become a member to like this course.

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses.

Get started

Already a member?

Exercise files

Learn by watching, listening, and doing! Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along. Exercise files are available with all Premium memberships. Learn more

Get started

Already a Premium member?

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Ask a question

Thanks for contacting us.
You’ll hear from our Customer Service team within 24 hours.

Please enter the text shown below:

The classic layout automatically defaults to the latest Flash Player.

To choose a different player, hold the cursor over your name at the top right of any lynda.com page and choose Site preferencesfrom the dropdown menu.

Continue to classic layout Stay on new layout
Welcome to the redesigned course page.

We’ve moved some things around, and now you can



Exercise files

Access exercise files from a button right under the course name.

Mark videos as unwatched

Remove icons showing you already watched videos if you want to start over.

Control your viewing experience

Make the video wide, narrow, full-screen, or pop the player out of the page into its own window.

Interactive transcripts

Click on text in the transcript to jump to that spot in the video. As the video plays, the relevant spot in the transcript will be highlighted.

Thanks for signing up.

We’ll send you a confirmation email shortly.


Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

Keep up with news, tips, and latest courses with emails from lynda.com.

Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

   
submit Lightbox submit clicked

Terms and conditions of use

We've updated our terms and conditions (now called terms of service).Go
Review and accept our updated terms of service.