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Getting Started with Lightroom 4
Illustration by John Hersey

Using Compare view


From:

Getting Started with Lightroom 4

with Tim Grey

Video: Using Compare view

From time to time, as you're reviewing your images in Lightroom, trying to identify your favorites, you may find that you have a series of images that perhaps is from a similar location or of a similar subject, and you want to identify a single favorite from that group. For example, I have a series of images here that were captured in the town of Holstah in Autria And I'd like to identify just one favorite image from this town. In this type of situation, I'll make use of the compare view so that I can compare multiple images and work my way down to a single favorite among that set. I'll start by clicking on the first image in the series. And then holding the Shift key, and clicking on the last image in the series. I will select all images in between.

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Getting Started with Lightroom 4
3h 22m Beginner Mar 06, 2012

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

Whether you're completely new to Adobe Lightroom or have been using it from the start, this course from author and digital imaging expert Tim Grey will help you get up to speed quickly with Lightroom 4. He provides a complete overview of the Lightroom interface and workflow and shows how to set up Lightroom to best suit your needs. Along the way, learn the basics of importing, managing, optimizing, and sharing your images. Plus, discover how to use features like auto-advance, Smart Collections, the Library Filter, the Map module, and more.

Topics include:
  • Getting to know the Lightroom interface
  • Establishing Lightroom preferences
  • Using catalogs
  • Importing images
  • Image review
  • Identifying and locating images
  • Optimizing and sharing images
Subjects:
Photography Raw Processing video2brain
Software:
Lightroom
Author:
Tim Grey

Using Compare view

From time to time, as you're reviewing your images in Lightroom, trying to identify your favorites, you may find that you have a series of images that perhaps is from a similar location or of a similar subject, and you want to identify a single favorite from that group. For example, I have a series of images here that were captured in the town of Holstah in Autria And I'd like to identify just one favorite image from this town. In this type of situation, I'll make use of the compare view so that I can compare multiple images and work my way down to a single favorite among that set. I'll start by clicking on the first image in the series. And then holding the Shift key, and clicking on the last image in the series. I will select all images in between.

And then I can switch to the Compare View. I can click on the Compare View button on the toolbar below the preview image or simply press the letter C on the keyboard. When I'm working in Compare View, I usually want to be able to see the images as large as possible, and so I'll typically hide all or most of the panels. I'll go ahead and hide all of the panels but then reveal the film strip so that I can keep an eye on which images I have in my group. The basic concept of the Compare View is that among the images selected there's one image that is my current select image, in theory my current favorite, and another image that is my candidate, the image that I'm reviewing to possibly replace my select. So I need to compare only two images at a time.

Do I like the image on the left better or do I prefer the image on the right? I can then navigate among the various images I've selected, continuing to compare two images at a time, until I've reviewed all images and settled on my favorite from the group. With the image on the left, the primary subject, of course, is the swan in the foreground, but the town and the mountains look a little bit small in the distance. So I don't really think that very strong image I prefer the image on the right, so like to have the candidate image become the select image.

There are two ways I can do that.I can switch the two images so that the candidate become the select, but the select remains in view as the candidate. I would generally only use this option, if I wasn't entirely sure about my decision. Of course there's really no reason to switch these images back, and fourth, as your making a decision. But you might find that helpful. The other option is to make the candidate your select image, and then replace the candidate with the next image in the group that you've selected.

So, I'll go ahead and click the button to make the candidate become the select, and to view the next image as my candidate. In this case, once again, I prefer the candidate image over the select image, so I'll go ahead and replace the candidate with the select. And now, while the candidate image is nice, I kind of like the appeal of the boats in the select image. So I think I'm going to move on to a different candidate to consider. And so I don't want to switch or replace the select image, instead I simply want to move to the next candidate image. So I'll click the right arrow button and we see a different candidate image. Once again, I think I prefer the image on the left over the image on the right. So I'll simply click the right arrow button once again to look at my next candidate image.

Notice along the way that the current select image has a small white diamond on it in the film strip and the current candidate image has a black triangle. And all of the images currently under review are highlighted. You can see that I'm now reviewing my last candidate image. So if I click the right arrow here, I won't be taken to a different candidate. Well the candidate image in this case could certainly use a little bit of work. I think that I need to brighten it up a little bit, maybe enhance contrast, goose the colors just a little bit. I do think that it's a stronger image than the select image, so I'll go ahead and replace the select with the candidate.

Because I've reached the end of the line, there is now not a selected candidate images, but I could click on a different image on the film strip in order to compare another image if I wanted to. As I'm making this evaluation, I can also zoom in the images if I'd like to compare them. I can simply click and drag the zoom slider in order to zoom in within the images. And those images will remain synchronized, as long as the lock icon shows that it is locked. I can click that lock icon to unlock, and now I can zoom out on one of the images. The image that is currently being controlled is shown by a white box around the image.

So if I want to change the zoom setting for my select image, I first need to click on it, and then adjust my zoom setting. If I've adjusted the zoom setting for one image, and want to synchronize the two, I can simply click the Sync button, and then lock those images, so that they will both move in sync with each other. This is obviously most helpful for situations where you have two images that are very similar and you want to check for example, for critical sharpness between those two images comparing similar area of each image. But at this point I think I have identified my favorite image I like this image over on the left side and so I will keep that as my selection. I'm finished with my review, so I can go ahead and click the Done button and that will switch me back to the Loop View display with the Select Image actually selected.

Having selected my favorite form that series I probably want to assign a color label and perhaps a star rating as well so I'll be able to get back to this image very easily later.

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