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Using Lightroom and Photoshop Together

Setting Lightroom preferences for editing in Photoshop


From:

Using Lightroom and Photoshop Together

with Jan Kabili

Video: Setting Lightroom preferences for editing in Photoshop

Integrating Lightroom and Photoshop usually begins with the Edit command in Lightroom's Photo menu. This command spearheads several workflows that we'll be looking at in this course that let you move photos efficiently between Lightroom and Photoshop, and ultimately end up with edited photos back in your Lightroom library for viewing and asset management. The first step in using the Edit In Command is to specify what kind of photos you expect to get back in your library after they have been handled by the two programs.
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  1. 10m 38s
    1. Welcome
      36s
    2. Using the exercise files
      4m 4s
    3. Why use Lightroom and Photoshop together?
      5m 58s
  2. 16m 37s
    1. Setting Lightroom preferences for editing in Photoshop
      6m 20s
    2. Setting file naming preferences in Lightroom
      4m 27s
    3. Maximizing PSD compatibility in Photoshop
      4m 40s
    4. Matching color settings
      1m 10s
  3. 24m 25s
    1. Passing raw files from Lightroom to Photoshop
      8m 17s
    2. Handling mismatches with Open Anyway
      6m 21s
    3. Handling mismatches with Render using Lightroom
      4m 43s
    4. Updating your software
      5m 4s
  4. 19m 41s
    1. Passing non-raw photos from Lightroom to Photoshop
      4m 9s
    2. Choosing Edit a Copy With Lightroom Adjustments
      5m 26s
    3. Choosing Edit a Copy
      3m 59s
    4. Choosing Edit Original
      3m 34s
    5. Revisiting edits
      2m 33s
  5. 17m 9s
    1. Creating presets for editing in Photoshop
      4m 51s
    2. Passing photos to Photoshop with presets
      4m 48s
    3. Creating presets for editing in Elements
      3m 4s
    4. Passing photos to Elements with presets
      4m 26s
  6. 10m 44s
    1. Sorting and stacking edited photos in Lightroom
      5m 1s
    2. Synchronizing metadata between Lightroom and Bridge
      5m 43s
  7. 56m 22s
    1. Building a panorama with Lightroom and Photoshop
      6m 57s
    2. Creating an HDR image with Lightroom and Photoshop
      5m 51s
    3. Creating a Photoshop Smart Object from Lightroom
      6m 32s
    4. Opening as layers in Photoshop from Lightroom
      4m 47s
    5. Applying photographic filters
      5m 33s
    6. Photo compositing
      7m 30s
    7. Making precise local corrections
      5m 28s
    8. Retouching and removing content
      6m 36s
    9. Enhancing photos with text and graphics
      7m 8s
  8. 39s
    1. Goodbye
      39s

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Using Lightroom and Photoshop Together
2h 36m Intermediate Oct 05, 2012

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

By combining Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop, you can take full advantage of each program's capabilities. Use Lightroom for photo organizing, sharing, and basic image enhancement. When you need more advanced retouching and editing features, one click sends a photo from Lightroom to Photoshop.

In this course, photographer and author Jan Kabili shows how to combine both programs. The course begins with details on how to set up the two programs for maximum compatibility. The course then covers strategies for working with photos in a variety of formats, sending them from Lightroom to Photoshop to viewing the edited results in Lightroom. The final chapter demonstrates several real-world scenarios for using Lightroom and Photoshop together.

Topics include:
  • Setting the Lightroom preferences for editing in Photoshop
  • Passing photos from Lightroom to Photoshop
  • Handling software version mismatches
  • Viewing and organizing Photoshop-edited photos in Lightroom
  • Creating Lightroom presets for external editing
  • Using Lightroom with Photoshop Elements
  • Building a panorama with Lightroom and Photoshop
  • Passing multiple photos to Photoshop for compositing
  • Sending photos to Photoshop for retouching and removing content
  • Bringing photos into Photoshop to add text and graphics
Subjects:
Photography Photo Management
Software:
Photoshop Lightroom
Author:
Jan Kabili

Setting Lightroom preferences for editing in Photoshop

Integrating Lightroom and Photoshop usually begins with the Edit command in Lightroom's Photo menu. This command spearheads several workflows that we'll be looking at in this course that let you move photos efficiently between Lightroom and Photoshop, and ultimately end up with edited photos back in your Lightroom library for viewing and asset management. The first step in using the Edit In Command is to specify what kind of photos you expect to get back in your library after they have been handled by the two programs.

And that's done in Lightroom's External Editing Preferences. I'll open my Preferences by pressing Cmd+Comma on the Mac, that's Ctrl+Comma on the PC. You can also open the Preferences window from the Lightroom menu on a Mac or from the Edit menu on a PC. In the External Editing tab, the first section, the one that's labeled Edit in Adobe Photoshop on my machine and probably on yours as well, contains options for Lightroom's primary external editor. Lightroom can pass files to other external editors too, as we'll discuss later, but the primary external editor is the default.

So if you use the shortcut for the Edit In command, which is Cmd+E on the Mac or Ctrl+E on the PC, the selected files in Lightroom will go automatically to the primary external editor, which will probably be Photoshop. The primary external editor can be only one of two applications, Photoshop or Photoshop Elements, which is Adobe's consumer-level editing application. The way it works is that Lightroom automatically sets as the Primary Editor the latest version of Photoshop that's installed on your computer.

If you don't have Photoshop on your computer, then Lightroom will look for Photoshop Elements, and if you have that it will set the latest installed version of Elements as your Primary Editor. If you have neither, then the primary external editing commands won't be available. So, what is the purpose of these options? Well, let's say that you have a raw file on Lightroom, and you want to pass it on to Photoshop for further editing. Now remember that Photoshop is a pixel editor, it can't display or handle raw data directly, so if you send a raw file from Lightroom to Photoshop, the raw file has to be rendered into a pixel-based image that you can see and work on in Photoshop.

And here with these options, you can specify the Color Space, the Bit Depth, and the Resolution with which the file will be rendered and opened into Photoshop. Also, when that file is saved from Photoshop, this File Format option comes into play to tell Photoshop the non-raw format in which to save the edited image. Now you can also pass a non-raw photo from Lightroom to Photoshop. By non-raw photo, here and throughout this course, I mean pixel-based formats like TIFF or PSD, which stands for Photoshop Document.

As you'll see later in the course, when you open a non-raw photo from Lightroom to Photoshop, you get an interim dialog box that gives you three options for how the file will be treated. One of those options is Edit a Copy with Lightroom Adjustments. When you choose that option then these primary external editing options will work just like they do with the raw file. They will determine the Color Space, the Bit Depth, and the Resolution with which the file opens in Photoshop and the File Format in which it's saved from Photoshop. We will go through raw and non-raw workflows later in the course, but for now I just wanted you to understand the general purpose of these options.

And now, let's take a quick look at these options. Here you can see them at their default settings, and it's perfectly okay to leave them at their defaults. But if you wish, instead of TIFF, you can choose to have file safe from Photoshop as PSD, which stands for Photoshop Document, which is the proprietary Photoshop file format. There really isn't too much difference between these two formats, you can just choose the one you are comfortable with. Both of them retain layers and other proprietary Photoshop features, and both can be saved in 8 or 16-bits. The main difference between them is that TIFF is not a proprietary Adobe format.

So if you need to pass files off to another person who is not an Adobe user then TIFF is a safer bet. The next option, Color Space, describes the color tag that will be embedded in the image. You can choose from only these three, ProPhoto RGB or AdobeRGB (1998), both of which are good choices for photos that are headed for print, or if you are preparing files for online viewing or for email, then sRGB is the best choice. I'm going to go with AdobeRGB.

I usually leave the Bit Depth of the file set to 16-bits, so I have the greatest number of tones in the image, and therefore the largest editing headroom in Photoshop. But if I am preparing files for online viewing or for email or because I am preparing files for this course and want them to be smaller, I'll choose 8-bits. I am going to leave the Resolution set to 240 pixels per inch, this refers to the number of pixels that would be assigned to every inch if and when this photo were printed. 240 pixels per inch is fine for photos destined for an Inkjet printer.

So I am going to leave it there. And remember, whatever you choose here in the Resolution field is not set in stone, it can always be changed later when you export a file from Lightroom. And finally, here is a Compression menu. This only comes into play when you have chosen TIFF as your file format. I'm just going to leave this set to its default of ZIP. I want to emphasize that there's noting special or magical about the particular settings that I have chosen here, this is just an example. The settings that you should choose when you're setting up your primary external editing options are those that make the most sense for the kind of photographs that you take most and the projects that you work on.

So those are the options for the primary external editor, which is usually going to be Photoshop. Again, these define the way that raw files will be rendered when they're passed from Lightroom to Photoshop for editing. It also specifies the format and the type of file that will end up back in your Lightroom catalog when you start off with the raw files, or with those non-raw files that you choose to edit as copies with the Lightroom adjustments, as I'll explain in the upcoming chapter on non-raw workflows. Now you probably notice that there are some other options in the Preferences here, and I'll be addressing each of these, the external editor preferences, stacking, and file naming as we move through the course.

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